Tag: Infrastructure Spending

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It’s a cliche: “Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” Attributed most frequently to George Santayana, it rests close to a biblical phrase, “And there is nothing new under the sun.” King Solomon is credited for that (Ecclesiastes 1:9). Both still ring true. So does a malapropism from legendary philosopher […]

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Brian Riedl joins Brian Anderson to discuss the state of play in Washington, D.C., the tug-of-war between progressive and moderate Democrats, and the long-term consequences of runaway federal spending.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

Governor DeSantis Ready to Rumble

 

Governor Ron Desantis official RumbleGovernor Ron DeSantis is ready to Rumble* with the radical Democrat regime and their social media wing. In April, Google/YouTube discriminated against his viewpoint and sought to silence a governor and real medical experts competing opinions by deleting a video conference recording. Governor Desantis did not engage in phony posturing.

Instead, he had his staff establish an official Rumble channel and change all video links in official press releases to point to Rumble. This means that the governor’s office of Florida is directing traffic away from YouTube toward a newer platform, Rumble. Governor Desantis shows what an aggressive, informed executive looks and sounds like.

INFRASTRUCTURE RHETORIC AND RESULTS:

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US Senator Lindsay Graham (R-SC) and his colleagues are right to be upset over negotiations with Democrats in the White House and Congress over infrastructure spending. But the Senior Senator from South Carolina’s short-term prescription for playing hardball – denying the Senate a quorum to conduct business – probably isn’t going to work. Here’s why. […]

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This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with Suffolk University Economics Prof. Jonathan Haughton about his research into the effects and costs attending the adoption of Project Labor Agreements in large construction projects. The discussion focuses on Prof. Haughton’s two research pieces, The Effects of Project Labor Agreements in Massachusetts, and Do Project Labor Agreements Raise Construction Costs?, and the implications of PLAs on future projects in Massachusetts.

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The American Jobs Plan has been touted by Vice President Kamala Harris as the biggest jobs investment since World War II. But how exactly will we pay for $2 trillion in new spending on infrastructure, green energy, housing, and education reform? Do the benefits of increased spending outweigh the proposal’s impact on deficits and tax rates?

Last week, Avik Roy held a panel discussion to dive in to the details with FREOPP scholars: Energy Scholar Robert Bryce, Health Care Scholar Gregg Girvan, Housing Scholar Roger Valdez, Education Scholar Dan Lips, Education Scholar Preston Cooper, and Financial Services Scholar Jon Hartley.

Beth Osborne, director of Transportation for America, joins City Journal contributing editor Nicole Gelinas to discuss the state of U.S. infrastructure and how federal spending could be used more effectively to improve safety and reduce fiscal waste.

The federal government spends between $40 billion and $60 billion on transportation infrastructure annually. In recent years, congressional leaders and the White House have pushed a $2 trillion plan to upgrade roads, bridges, and more. But such proposals, Osborne argues, “would throw more money into the same flawed system.”

Robert Poole joins City Journal contributing editor Nicole Gelinas to discuss Poole’s new book, Rethinking America’s Highways: a 21st-Century Vision for Better Infrastructure.

Americans spend untold hours every year sitting in traffic. And despite billions of taxpayer dollars spent by transportation agencies, our nation’s roads, tunnels, guardrails, and bridges are in serious disrepair. According to transportation expert Poole, traffic jams and infrastructure deterioration are inevitable outcomes of American infrastructure policymaking, which is overly politicized and prone to short-term thinking.

This week on Banter, AEI visiting scholar and director of the Cornell Program in Infrastructure Policy Rick Geddes joined the show to discuss the Trump administration’s long-awaited infrastructure plan and the future of US infrastructure policy. Geddes’ work at AEI focuses on infrastructure, public and private partnerships, the US postal system and postal delivery policy, and corporate governance. He hosted Under Secretary for Policy at the Department of Transportation Derek Kan and a panel of infrastructure policy experts at AEI for a discussion of the details of the plan. You can watch the full event video at the link below.

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John Tierney joins Seth Barron to discuss the Trump administration’s plans to reform how infrastructure projects are managed and funded.

Civil engineers and other experts (including here at City Journal) have warned for years that the country’s roads, bridges, tunnels, airports, and rail lines are in serious need of repair. Thanks in part to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, infrastructure is now at the top of the national agenda.

New York City’s Infrastructure Is a Mess. Who Is to Pay?

 

Bloomberg News/Businessweek ran an extensive piece about the potentially disastrous condition of Penn Station in New York City and the perilous state of the two Hudson River tunnels that feed it. The tunnels are over 100 years old. The construction fill from the original World Trade Center that was used to create new land changed the course of the Hudson in such a way as to erode the river bed above the tunnels. Hurricane Sandy partly filled the tunnels with salty water, and the salt deposits are eating away at the elderly concrete.

The tunnels now carry far more people than they were ever envisioned to carry into the busiest single train station in the United States, so closing them for repairs would congest commuter traffic horribly, and projects to construct newer tunnels to supplement these aging ones have never come to fruition. So the author of the piece, Devin Leonard, details in his article:

As the gateway to America’s largest city, Penn Station should inspire awe, as train stations do in London, Paris, Tokyo, and other competently managed metropolises. Instead, it embodies a particular kind of American failure—the inability to maintain roads, rails, ports, and other necessary conduits. For generations, the officials connected to Penn Station have been blind to, or unable to deliver on, the idea that improving the station would more than pay for itself. (One estimate, from the Business Roundtable, says that a dollar invested in infrastructure yields as much as $3 in economic growth.) In the final days of 2017, the situation reached perhaps its bleakest point yet, when the Trump administration signaled its disinterest in coming to the rescue: The president will not honor an Obama-era commitment to New York and New Jersey to foot half the cost of a new tunnel, dumping planners back at square one. [emphasis mine]