Tag: Independents

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Remember when Hillary Clinton called Republicans and Conservatives “a basket of deplorables”? ‘You could put half of Trump’s supporters into what I call the basket of deplorables. Right,’ Clinton said, drawing laughter and applause as she addressed about 1,000 donors at an LGBT for Hillary fundraising gala in New York City, ‘The racist, sexist, homophobic, […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Will we see a big “blue wave” this November that puts Democrats back in control of the US House of Representatives or a more modest action the hurts Republicans but doesn’t end their majority status? David Brady, the Hoover Institution’s Davies Senior Fellow and a Stanford political scientist, assesses the current state of the electorate – and what the recent vote in California says about the odds of the House flipping for a third time in a little over a decade.Will we see a big “blue wave” this November that puts Democrats back in control of the US House of Representatives or a more modest action the hurts Republicans but doesn’t end their majority status? David Brady, the Hoover Institution’s Davies Senior Fellow and a Stanford political scientist, assesses the current state of the electorate – and what the recent vote in California says about the odds of the House flipping for a third time in a little over a decade.

More

Where does President Trump stand in the opinion polls now that his second hundred days in office are complete? David Brady and Doug Rivers, both Hoover senior fellows and Stanford political scientists, reveal data showing where Republicans and independents stand on this presidency and what if any effect developing news in Charlottesville and North Korea might have on Trump’s popularity.

More

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Moderation Isn’t Compromise

 

Responding to a Vox article by Ezra Klein, Mark Steyn explains how the common understanding of “moderate” voters is mistaken:

Because the first position is “left” and the second position is “right,” the pollsters split the difference and label such a person a “moderate.” But he isn’t actually a moderate, so much as bipartisanly extreme. In practice, most “moderates” boil down to that: They hold some leftie and some rightie positions. The most familiar type of “moderate” in American politics are the so-called “fiscally conservative, socially liberal” red governors of blue states. […] As Trump’s detractors see it, he’s just a reality-show buffoon with a portfolio of incoherent attitudes that display no coherent worldview. But very few people go around with a philosophically consistent attitude to life: Your approach to, say, health insurance is determined less by abstract principles than by whether you can afford it. Likewise, your attitude to the DREAMers may owe more to whether your local school district is collapsing under the weight of all this heartwarming diversity.

More

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Our Non-Ideological Brethren &
the Muddle in the Middle

 

independentThere is a great swath of America which has no defined ideology. Nixon spoke of the silent majority. Reagan had his Democrats. Today’s punditry speaks of the “independents,” a growing segment who cannot abide either party. Obama, too, had his non-ideological supporters: people inspired to vote who might otherwise not participate. Though not a majority in themselves, they were enough to make one when cobbled with the otherwise disparate left-wing coalition. Mitt Romney — as competent and good a man as has ever run for president — was outmatched, unable to pull enough votes from those unmotivated by ideology, and too uninspiring to capture sufficient support from the Republican base.

Conservatism, with its less-sanguine view of humanity (history is not exactly proof of mankind’s benevolent nature) can be pretty dark. We distrust others, see more adversaries than friends in world politics, and generally distrust governance. We often seem like the Debbie Downer at the 4th of July picnic. This somber tendency allows us to be caricatured as staid, pessimistic, obstinate, scolding, judgmental, stingy, and even selfish. We don’t like change. We are — at best — cautious and our attachment to the past can seem, well, backward.

More