Tag: Impeachment

Join Jim and Greg as they salute Capitol Police Officer Eugene Goodman for his quick thinking in leading the mob away from the U.S. Senate on Wednesday. They also discuss the growing support for a recall of California Gov. Gavin Newsom, as California fails some of the most basic functions of government. And they point out that for all the alleged urgency towards another impeachment, congressional leaders seem to be pretty patient.

Member Post

 

We know that President Trump has not been guilty of criminal incitement to violence. We know that because we have transcripts of everything he’s said, and we have clear standards for criminal incitement to violence. He hasn’t met those standards. We know that anyone who says there was no fraud is mistaken. Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Oh man, it’s media day in our year-end Three Martini Lunch awards and Jim and Greg are holding nothing back.  Specifically, they look at the stories the mainstream media covered far too much, the ones they conveniently ignored because they didn’t fit their narrative, and what they saw as the best stories of 2020.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Brenda Wineapple, author of the award-winning Hawthorne: A Life and The Impeachers: The Trial of Andrew Johnson and the Dream of a Just Nation. They discuss her definitive biography of Nathaniel Hawthorne and the 170th anniversary of the publication of his classic novel, The Scarlet Letter. They explore how Hawthorne’s writing was shaped by the author’s Salem, Massachusetts setting and his notorious Puritan ancestor, who had been involved in the Witchcraft Trials. Brenda describes why Hester Prynne, the protagonist of The Scarlet Letter, is such a compelling heroine, and why students today should read Hawthorne’s work. The discussion then turns to Brenda’s most recent book, The Impeachers, and the impulse to condemn or publicly shame. President Andrew Johnson’s impeachment trial was the first against any U.S. chief executive. Brenda talks about how it influenced Americans’ view of their chief executives, accountability, and whether we are likely to see increased attempts to remove presidents from office. The episode concludes with Brenda doing a reading from The Impeachers.

Stories of the Week: In New Hampshire, the state Supreme Court is hearing a case challenging the adequacy of the state’s school funding formula, contending that local taxpayers are being unfairly required to cover a disproportionate amount of school budgets. In South Carolina, the pandemic has led to a substantial increase in enrollment in virtual charter schools.

The Hearing of Attorney General Barr Is an Abomination

 

I can’t take it anymore. Watching the attack by Democrats on AG Barr at his hearing is a demonstration of the worst kind of politics imaginable. The House Judiciary Committee is not interested in receiving any kind of information. They are only interested in insulting, attacking, and silencing the Attorney General. I’ve seen my share of hearings, but this one was beyond the pale.

Grandstanding and false statements by the Democrats are very familiar. But they clearly coordinated their strategy with each other. First, they would insult him, state hyperbole, and eventually they would ask him a question, demanding a yes or no answer. They repeatedly cut him off when he tried to explain his response, or when he asked for clarification of what was supposed to be a question, and they continued to interrupt him. It’s clear they were trying to establish a basis for impeaching him, but every one of them should be removed from office.

Member Post

 

I would say “Trump Focus,” but this implicates the press and opposition as well. It was in a long email insert that is probably circulating and I don’t know of the accuracy for dates cited. Earlier people given credit for the connection were American Spectator’s Dov Fischer and Joel Pollack at Breitbart. Eridemus would like the […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

The President, the Chief Justice, the Senate Majority Leader, and at least one other of Chuck Schumer’s Senate colleagues have denounced his threat against two Supreme Court justices. Naturally, Republicans are concerned that someone might take Schumer’s words as an invitation to violence. Senator Schumer’s threat against originalist justices deserves strong rebuke and censure, and […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Just stop pretending that abuse of power is impeachable. It’s not. The people who wrote the Constitution considered abuse of power as an impeachable offense, they called it “maladministration”, and they rejected it. The out-of-power party always claims that the party in power is abusing its power. That’s politics. That’s not impeachable. You can impeach […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Can we talk about Eric Ciaramella?

 

Can we talk about Eric Ciaramella

Serious question: Where are we allowed to talk about alleged Ukraine whistleblower Eric Ciaramella? It seems like so few are doing so even though he is one of the final missing pieces of the puzzle at the conclusion of the impeachment saga, a loose end that won’t seem to go away.

You can’t talk about him on YouTube, as Senator Rand Paul learned.

Member Post

 

The President does not want this kind of impeachment in the future for any Executive. If the Free Speech clause was being applied to restrain Congress then impeachment would ONLY happen as a bi-partisan event. Majority Rule abridges citizens speech. Majority Rule in Congress violates the Constitution. Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

As President Trump likes to say, the impeachment process was a “hoax.” Some say that the accusations that the House of Representatives made against him may have been true, but many legal experts agree that they were not “impeachable.” Then the question becomes, can an impeachment be expunged? Can the Supreme Court rule President Trump’s […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Sea Change: No One Blaming Iowa on Trump!

 

I’ve scoured all the usual suspects across the Internet, excluding social media, only because … raw sewage. But neither the alphabet media nor the NY or LA Times nor the Post nor Pravda has attempted to blame Iowa on Trump.

If anything, they seem to be hoping the whole kerfuffle is forgotten before someone ties their performance to a long string of epic political blunders. Like nominating Hillary so she would retire the DNC’s massive debt in 2016, or staging the most ham-handed coup attempt in the history of the republic in the name of protecting democracy. A move so reminiscent of mid-20th-century fascism that their preemptive accusation of fascism against the opposing side signaled their own transparent perfidy.

Member Post

 

This could be counterproductive for a political site, but given the last few months – and the last week in particular – I feel like I do after the Super Bowl or World Series: glad for the break. Yes, there’s plenty to discuss. Yes, the Super Bowl provides a few days of commentary about the […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Another wild day in a very busy week! So grab a stool and join Jim and Greg as they break down the latest headlines. First, they get a kick out of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell immediately following up the impeachment trial by filing cloture on five more judicial nominees. They also feel like wretching as mainstream media figures who savaged Mitt Romney during the 2012 campaign suddenly extol him as a man of faith and principle because he voted the way they wanted him to. But they also spend time highlighting figures on the right who were way over the top in their condemnation of Romney. And they try to make sense out of the latest scraps of conflicting information coming from Democrats in Iowa while also looking ahead to New Hampshire.

Throw Mitt Romney Out

 

Mitt Romney has voted with the Democrats to convict President Donald Trump on the first of their BS articles of impeachment. This comes after Romney voted for more witnesses, which the House could have called but chose not to, because he didn’t think there was enough evidence. My tolerance for squishy Republicans is pretty much limited to Susan Collins, who at least has the benefit of coming from a squishy state. But Mitt didn’t vote to convict because he’s squishy, rather because he has a personal dislike of Trump. Mitt is beneath contempt. He should be expelled from the Senate GOP conference and stripped of all his committee assignments.

The Democrats, with Mitt’s help, tried and failed to impeach Trump. The House didn’t even pretend to accuse Trump of an actual “high Crime or Misdemeanor,” as required by the Constitution. Their contempt for the Constitution is only surpassed by their contempt for Trump, which is to say their contempt for you, the voters. They didn’t impeach Trump. Trump was not impeached. His acquittal voids the impeachment. They impeached you. But Mitt was fine with that because he doesn’t like Trump.

Senate Acquits Trump

 

The Senate voted to acquit President Trump on both articles of impeachment Wednesday.  On the first impeachment charge of abuse of power, the tally was 48-52, far short of the two-thirds requirement. All Democrats voted for removal; Sen. Mitt Romney (Utah) was the only Republican voting for removal.

On the second impeachment charge, obstruction of Congress, it was 47-53 on a party-line vote. Romney voted with the majority on this one.

Member Post

 

Mitt Romney has just announced that he’ll vote to convict Trump on the first article of impeachment, but not the second.  I wish I’d seen the speech but I’ve been thinking a lot about this, and I think Romney is in the zone of reasonableness.  I also think Lamar Alexander, who has said he’s voting […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Confine Presidential Impeachment to Criminal Acts

 

The United States Senate has voted, along virtually strict party lines, not to call witnesses on the two key charges in the impeachment trial of the President: that President Trump abused his power by withholding military aid to Ukraine, and that he also obstructed Congress by refusing to participate in the House’s impeachment investigation. Given this outcome, the acquittal of the President is virtually assured to come Wednesday.

The Senate’s decision rests on this narrow but controversial definitional question: What is an impeachable offense? This past December, a “Letter to Congress” signed by over 800 constitutional law professors defended the legal position that “conduct need not be criminal to be impeachable. The standard here is constitutional; it does not depend on what Congress has chosen to criminalize. Impeach is a remedy for grave abuses of the public trust.”

More recently, a similar legal position was taken by one of Trump’s more eloquent defenders, Professor Jonathan Turley of the George Washington University Law School. He attacked Harvard’s Emeritus Professor Alan Dershowitz for claiming impeachment of the President requires the commission of some criminal act, something that was not alleged in the House’s impeachment articles. But unlike the Professors’ Letter to Congress, Turley sought to split the difference: “I do not believe that the House managers have sufficiently rebutted the defense of the president and specifically established the necessary intent to hold the Ukrainian aid for solely political purposes (as opposed to a policy concern of corruption or sharing costs with allies).” But, he continued, “I still believe that [Dershowitz] is fundamentally wrong in maintaining that impeachable offenses must be based on actual crimes or ‘crime-like’ conduct.”