Tag: Illinois

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Illinois Watchdogs Bark Up the Right Tree of Social Justice and Reform

 

I hail from a family that lived on the south side of Chicago proper in the 1950s; a time when that area was known for its lush city parks, friendly communities, and a general aura of prosperity.

But it was also a city community in which “da mayor” ruled over everything with an iron hand. That man was Richard Daley, Sr., who back in the Nineteen Teens and Twenties, had attended the same city schools as my father. It was not unusual for the phone to ring on a Saturday afternoon and one of Daley’s lieutenants ask to speak with my dad.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. What Does This Say About the Government of Illinois?

 

The state just legalized recreational marijuana use, and the demand has been so high that the pot shops are running out of supply. And the state’s Lieutenant Governor, Juliana Stratton, at the head of the line to buy.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Illinois Faces a ‘Red Menace’ Made of Ink

 

The Chicago Tribune has published the story of a family trying to obtain services for their autistic son. He “aged out” of Illinois’ special education system when he turned 22 and was put on the State’s “Prioritization for Urgency of Need for Services” (PUNS) list, a waitlist for disabilities services administered by the Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS). From the story:

“Nick is among nearly 20,000 people with developmental disabilities in Illinois who are on a waiting list to get into adult programs. Many of them come from families who don’t have a way to pay for home care, job coaches or other services.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America marvel at the civic illiteracy in the gun debate, as Fox Business Network host Trish Regan asserts that President Trump could simply issue an executive order to ban assault weapons. They also discuss Trump’s bizarre fascination with possibly commuting the prison sentence of disgraced former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich. And they have a lot of fun with Bernie Sanders and Joe Rogan discussing whether a President Sanders would reveal everything the government knows about aliens and UFO’s.

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Alexandra DeSanctis of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer Democratic Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards for making good on his promise to sign pro-life “heartbeat” legislation that was also sponsored by a Democrat. They also shudder as a pro-life lawmaker in Illinois explains just how expansive pro-choice lawmakers there want to make their abortion laws. And they groan as President Trump threatens to address the very real and very serious problem at the border by imposing tariffs on Mexican imports.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America toast the conservative upset in the Australian elections. They also note Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg keeps taking far left positions on issues, disproving the media myth of him being a moderate. And they react to Illinois conservatives wanting to separate Chicago from the rest of the state.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Genius v. Stupidity? Genius Has Its Limits

 

Today’s lesson is about what the newly-elected members of Congress from the 6th and 14th Districts of Illinois don’t know about their jobs.

It begins with a headline in the Northwest Herald that says: “Underwood, Casten Call for IRS to Help With Local Tax Burden.” The article goes on to say:

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Aaron Renn and Rafael Mangual join City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s legacy, the Windy City’s ongoing homicide epidemic, and its severely underfunded public pensions.

Chicago’s energetic leader shocked the political world this week when he announced that he would not seek a third term as mayor. Emanuel leaves behind a mixed record: he enjoyed some successes, but he largely failed to grapple with the city’s two biggest problems: finances and violent crime.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. We’re Out of Therapists, Send in the Gunfighter

 

Some Illinois lawmakers want to give extra money to schools that replace armed security officers with unarmed social workers and behavior therapists, an approach to safety that’s far different than a national push to add police or arm teachers after a mass shooting at a Florida high school.

Rep. Emanuel “Chris” Welch, a Hillside Democrat, said he proposed the plan after hearing from advocates who argue that investing in mental health resources is the best way of treating the epidemic of violence.

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Richard Epstein explains how public pensions came to be a ticking time bomb for states and cities throughout the U.S., what the financial ramifications are, and why the road to reform is so perilous.

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I’ve just put up a new post on my blog which discusses the latest crisis to hit the Land of Lincoln. Illinois’ municipalities are cutting into essential public services to pay for increasing pension costs, and it’s only going to get worse: While I’ve been pointing out for years that the State’s 5 pension systems […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Public Unions May Get Their Due

 
Mark Janus, who works for the state government in Illinois sued AFSCME, saying he does not agree with its positions and should not be forced to pay fees to support its work..

Public employee unions may have fleeced taxpayers one time too many. Two court cases involving Illinois residents resisting forced union fees and representation may give the US Supreme Court the opportunity to restore employee and taxpayer freedoms.

The High Court agreed to consider Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, Council 31 on September 28. This case involves a state employee (Mark Janus) who argues that his requirement to pay fees to the union (AFSCME) violates his First Amendment rights. Unions require such fees even of nonunion members, like Janus, saying nonunion members benefit from union lobbying. Janus is asking the Court to overrule a 1977 decision, Abood v. Detroit Board of Education, that allows public unions to force nonmembers to pay a “fair share” of the collective bargaining costs. The justices will likely hear oral arguments in early 2018 and issue an opinion by the end of June.

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For those of you who live here, or just have a morbid curiosity with what’s going on in Illinois, here’s my take on the education funding bill which was just passed: On Monday, the House finally passed an education funding bill. The last time the legislature passed a funding bill was in 1997, and in […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss rapidly dropping rates in illegal immigration across the southern border. They also reproach Illinois state representatives – especially Republicans – for agreeing to tax hikes instead of dealing with major fiscal problems. And they question CNN’s decision to intimidate an anonymous Reddit user over the controversial GIF President Trump re-tweeted on Sunday. To finish off the day, they criticize the History Channel for concluding what happened to Amelia Earhart based largely on one photograph.

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Ian Tuttle of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America celebrate the House passing “Kate’s Law” and agreeing to further crackdowns on sanctuary cities. They also discuss the dismal financial prospects of Illinois, which has racked up massive amounts of debt and that additional tax increases cannot solve despite the insistence of Democrats. And they contemplate the partisan fallout if Twitter releases a “fake news” button for its site. Finally, they extol the genius of America as they prepare to celebrate Independence Day and the Three Martini Lunch pauses until July 5.

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We’re now in day 3 of the special session of the Illinois General Assembly, called by the Governor to make it look like we’re doing something about getting a budget. The first 2 days have been, well, less than productive. Today’s Chicago Tribune editorial sums it up pretty well: “Day Two of the Illinois General […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Progressively Bankrupt

 

A recent story in the Wall Street Journal foretells a grim financial future for Connecticut, the wealthiest state in the union by per capita income. Its great wealth, however, does not translate into financial stability. For this coming year, the state expects a $400 million shortfall in tax collections that will only compound its looming budget deficit of some $5.1 billion, attributable to the usual suspects: service on existing debt, a lowered credit rating, surging pension obligations, runaway health care expenditures, and a declining population. In both 2011 and 2015, Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy sought to fill the fiscal gap by engineering two tax increases on the state’s wealthiest citizens, so that today the state’s highest tax bracket is 6.99 percent. Under the state’s tax pyramid, about one-third of the state’s $7-billion budget is paid by the several thousand people earning over $1 million per year.

But reality has finally set in. Kevin Sullivan, head of Connecticut’s tax commission, has conceded that “you can’t go back to that well again.” Determined progressives may claim the path to prosperity remains blue. But sooner or later, the bubble has to burst. Even the well-heeled individuals willing to pay high taxes for superior services will cut back their business activities or flee when fleeced. Massive government wealth transfers cannot succeed if those whose wealth is to be transferred end up leaving the state altogether. Indeed, in some cases, the departure of just one billionaire can lead to a hole in the budget, as with David Tepper’s departure from New Jersey.

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We’re heading into the final 2 weeks of the spring session of the Illinois legislature, and tensions are running pretty high. Small wonder, since we’re no closer to a budget and the effort to revise our antiquated method of paying for education is plodding along with little sense of urgency. I came up with the […]

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Member Post

 

The Illinois Policy Institute put together an excellent documentary about Michael Madigan. They have made it available on YouTube. Anyone that wishes to learn more about the blatant corruption in Illinois, this is worth your time. It is just under an hour long. Michael Madigan has been speaker of the Illinois House for 31 of […]

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Member Post

 

Probably the least-watched Senate race in the US right now is the one in Illinois. It features Senator Mark Kirk (R) vs. Representative Tammy Duckworth (D). Sen. Kirk is known for being surprisingly flexible and is able to easily put his foot in his mouth or his cranium up his own derriere. He once described […]

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