Tag: ignorance

Quote of the Day: Inexperience

 

“In America the young are always ready to give those who are older the full benefits of their inexperience.” — Oscar Wilde

Are we ever seeing examples of this over the last few weeks. In Seattle, the young (and privileged) set up an autonomous zone that immediately devolves from their intended socialist paradise to something out of Lord of the Flies. They tear down statues of Grand and abolitionist Union leaders because of slavery or something. They threaten to topple a statue of Lincoln – paid for and erected by former slaves because white racism, or something. They demand everyone think just like they do because truth, or something.

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The immediate prompt for this rant is that the State of Rhode Island has dropped from its formal name “and Providence Plantations” because ignorant people cannot associate the word “plantation” with anything other than “slavery.” But there have been many other efforts to force businesses, real estate developments, and others to banish the word “plantation.” […]

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Schools should be places where the attainment of knowledge and the love for it is nurtured unto no end.  Students should be seen as sponges that can soak up all that they hear and see within a classroom.  Now, one must not be naive about the difficulty of any teacher’s main objective: helping students reach […]

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Bill Nye, Harry Potter, and Why Millennials Can’t Think

 

Millennials can’t think.  They get their science from Bill Nye.  Their only form of literary reference is the Harry Potter franchise.  Read another book, please! Bill Nye was fun in the 90’s to get the basics about science – law of gravity, simple machines, energy transfer.  I think the place that Bill Nye holds in the culture today is due to the nostalgia of millennials.

I’ve seen a number of the episodes of Nye’s original series, Bill Nye the Science Guy.  I remember watching the show in grade-school and junior high.  His shows and topics covered in each episode were quite superficial; they served as an entertaining introduction to whatever new topic we were beginning to learn about.  There was no depth there.  He was an entertaining figure when I was in fifth, sixth, and seventh grade; now he’s just a dolt.  Fellow millennials (and you gen-xers) please stop holding up this bad actor as a “scientist.”

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One of my Facebook interlocutors’ favourite talking points is that Trump is so bad that “we can’t give him the benefit of the doubt”. I was unclear on what that actually meant, in practice. I mean, what did this interlocutor suggest those disappointed by the election results should actually do about it? Preview Open

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Setting aside the propriety of a presidential candidate’s company doing business with a Russian bank (cuz that’s a whole different topic), I find it kinda hilarious how all the stories I’m reading keep referring to the Trump Organizations’s use of a “private server”. Preview Open

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How Can You Not Know This?

 

shutterstock_172810082I have a peculiar area of expertise: I know a lot about death. Well, more precisely, I know more than the average person about bereavement, especially sudden, violent bereavement. I have come by this through my own losses, dedicated study, and, especially, through nearly 15 years of  experience as a law enforcement chaplain. Law enforcement officers often have the sad duty of performing what is known as “death notification,” and it is one they gladly hand off to the chaplain whenever possible. It is one of the subjects I teach at our academy.

A few years ago, I began to receive invitations from members of the medical profession who wished to learn more about death notification. The first time the state’s chapter of the American Academy of Surgeons asked me to address their meeting, I was puzzled. After all, these were doctors: highly educated professionals that must regularly (if reluctantly) come face-to-face with death. “Don’t you know more about this than I do?” I asked.

Apparently not. So I went and spoke about the very early stages of bereavement: the first seconds, minutes, hours after news of a loved one’s decease has been transmitted. And as the assembled surgeons nodded, took notes, and intelligently asked what seemed to me pretty basic questions, I kept thinking how can you not know this?