Tag: identity

Squabble Over the Squad Gets Squalid

 

“Send her back, send her back, send her back!” the crowd thunderously chanted at a recent Trump rally. They were referring, of course, to Rep. Ilhan Omar, originally from Somalia and one of the main, malcontented mean girls of what has been recently designated as the “Squad.”

One commentator compared the chanting to “two minutes of hate” from George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, the dystopian novel about a nightmarish authoritarian regime. Seriously? Leftists, whose numbers terrifyingly continue to swell, have been hating on America every second of every day for the last fifty years or more. They hate America, they hate the Founding Fathers, they hate every facet of our history, they hate our customs, they hate Judeo-Christian religion, they hate Western civilization, they hate capitalism, they hate self-reliance, they hate beauty, they hate truth, they hate sexual and gender normalcy, they hate “whiteness” itself.

More

When Leftist Worlds Collide

 

In a rapidly declining Western civilization gone mad with progressive ideology, one of the few pleasures available for people with traditional values is watching one fringe element of the left trash another fringe element of the left. It doesn’t necessarily do much to slow down the civilizational destruction, but it provides sporadic moments of intense pleasure.

One case in point: Leonardo DiCaprio. Did you know that the world-famous actor and climate activist is guilty of promoting white supremacy? Neither did most people, but after all, he is white, rich and powerful, so it just stands to reason, right?

More

Eudaimonia and Identity

 

America’s culture is a constant source of discussion here on Ricochet. Whether it’s homosexual marriage or marijuana decriminalization/legalization, culture permeates our discussions. I just finished reading Mona Charen’s piece over at NRO, “The Price of Feminism,” this morning and it coincided with me finishing Yuval Levin’s Fractured Republic and Charles Murray’s Coming Apart last week.

The reason I mention all three pieces in regard to American culture is that they all point to decline or change in the culture. Levin’s book focuses predominantly on the decline of civil society in America and its replacement by the federal government through the process of what he calls “bifurcated-consolidation.” Murray’s book looks to the physical results of 60 years of cultural change that has seen the founding virtues (Murray’s words, not mine) of marriage, honesty, religion, and industriousness falter in the lower classes and stay strong in the upper classes.

More

Member Post

 

Some of the best movies are the ones that provide surface entertainment while having something deeper to think or talk about if you so wish to go that far. As far as Children’s movies go, this movie delivered. Like an onion, every subsequent viewing of Disney’s Moana revealed something a bit deeper than the last. At the […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Humans are social animals. With society comes a couple of things that are out of our control – things such as reputation, and identity. Can we pass laws to change this? More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Understanding why we remember what we remember is the strongest mechanical tool a fiction writer can have in penning a short story or novel that avoids tedium and is pleasurable to read. The majority of my specific memories, memories that occurred often long ago, remain poignant to me because something about what happened was a […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

How about a break from politics? To atheists, it would be silly to ask why twins exist. The phenomenon is easily chalked up to random mutation; mere happenstance. But we believers must relate everything to the divine plan of our omniscient God. So I ask:  More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

This article has been making the rounds lately, and it is a very good and apt description of the increasingly illiberal nature of college campuses. It is indeed refreshing to see that liberal thinkers are starting to admit a problem, and I’m not quite as pessimistic and blase about this as Charles C.W. Cooke. However, […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Welcome, at last, to the official book discussion of Fr. Robert J. Spitzer’s Ten Universal Principles: A Brief Philosophy of the Life Issues. I’ll pose a question or two to get us started, but first, I’d like to restate the principles for reference throughout our discussion. Principles of Reason More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.