Tag: Identity Politics

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From Thomas Sowell’s 2004 book, Affirmative Action Around the World: An Empirical Study: Despite incessant repetition of the word “diversity” and sweeping dogmas about its social benefits, countries that have suffered the intergroup strife which has so often accompanied the politicization of intergroup differences have then gone to great trouble to try to create enclaves […]

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I’ve noticed an interesting thing following yesterday’s election: the media may not quite know how to handle Sharice Davids’ win in Kansas’ 3rd Congressional District. From the Kansas City Star’s website: “Davids, a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation, will be the first Native American woman to serve in Congress — a distinction she shared with New […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Identity Politics Goes to the Opera

 

This season, star soprano Anna Netrebko is singing the title role in Verdi’s Aida at the Metropolitan Opera. The opera tells the story of an Ethiopian princess (Aida) captured by the Egyptians who falls in love with their celebrated, conquering warrior. Netrebko is not Ethiopian, but Russian, and the fact that she is supposed to be portraying an Ethiopian princess is a point of contention in a few parts of the opera world.

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In politics, language matters. (Here, I must insert an obligatory Orwell reference.) Marginal theories can seep into the mainstream when marginal vocabulary seeps into the mainstream. Such is the case with identity politics — and, in particular, the trendy phrase “people of color.” I’ve noticed, even within the conservative commentariat (Reihan Salam, I’m looking at […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I owe Unsk an apology. Many moons ago, in March, I wrote a piece about the clash between classical liberalism and historic preservation. It occasioned about a dozen comments, all thoughtful. Unsk, an architect, shared a story about his (her? . . . some names are ambiguous) experience with the Secretary of the Interior’s preservation guidelines. According […]

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In a version of the “Spirit of McCain,” it’s time for a little straight talk about how conservatives, traditionalists and Republicans need to understand and approach the coming mid-term elections. The Democrats are becoming a coalition of “woke” anti-racist white progressives and various minority tribes, of non-whites and pathological whites, arrayed against the GOP’s mostly […]

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John Tierney joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss the First-Year Experience (FYE), a widely adopted program that indoctrinates incoming college freshmen in radicalism, identity politics, and victimology.

Beginning as a response to the campus unrest of the 1960s and 1970s, the FYE originally sought to teach students to “love their university,” with a semester-long course for freshmen. Today’s FYE programs, however—largely designed by left-wing college administrators, not professors—sermonize about subjects like social justice, environmental sustainability, gender pronouns, and microaggressions.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Portland: “Lord of the Flies” Redux

 

The “occupation” of an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) field office for five weeks in June and July, and a violent confrontation between anarchist “Antifa” groups and a Patriot Prayer/Proud Boys group on August 4, both occurring in Portland, OR, are reminiscent of the tribalism and descent into depravity depicted in William Golding’s Lord of the Flies, first published in 1954.

Golding’s classic novel depicts the fate of British schoolboys marooned on a tropical island during an unnamed war. The boys organize into two groups, one led by Ralph, assisted by bespectacled, overweight Piggy, and another led by the malevolent Jack. The two groups have conflicts over hunting, work rules, and power on their remote island.

Heather Mac Donald joins Brian Anderson to discuss how universities and the scientific community are being pressured to alter the gender and racial balance in STEM disciplines—science, technology, engineering, and math—and the implications for America’s future.

For decades, multiculturalism, quotas, and identity politics have been pervasive in humanities departments at most major universities—but not in scientific fields. Now that’s changing, as the identity-politics obsession has penetrated STEM programs, and administrators, professors, and other officials attempt to increase the number of women and minorities in the field, by almost any means necessary. As Mac Donald writes, this pressure is “changing how science is taught and how scientific qualifications are evaluated. The results will be disastrous for scientific innovation and for American competitiveness.”

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Today I’m launching a new podcast, Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten, and I’d like to ask for some help from the Ricochet community in making it as successful as possible. Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten features compelling long-form conversations with exceptional thinkers and doers — primarily though not exclusively of a conservative/libertarian bent — on the most critical ideas […]

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We live in a golden age of identity politics. We set people in myriad boxes and categories — racial, sexual, religious, political — and stamp our feet when a few intrepid souls dare to leave their alloted places. Our culture finds value in variety and shuns all forms of unity, save for whatever unity develops within the […]

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Richard Epstein looks at how attempts to suppress conservative speakers on college campuses intersects with the First Amendment, and calls on 50 years of experience as a university professor to diagnose how liberal activism has changed over the years.

Victor Davis Hanson weighs in on efforts to protect children brought into the United States illegally, considers how a humane immigration policy can be reconciled with America’s national interests, and explains why paeans to diversity mask some of the most difficult issues surrounding immigration policy.

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 I knew I’d arrived, no matter the dark, unlit night. The radio ads cackled when my car passed into Trump Country. I lived there for only a week, a psychiatrist covering an inpatient unit in rural Western Pennsylvania. I loved the time warp there, the diners, deli’s, and pocked-marked streets that snaked up, around hills. […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. I Am Not Embarrassed by Harvey Weinstein

 

WeinsteinAnne Bayefsky’s article on Fox News suggested: “Harvey Weinstein is an embarrassment — for Jews, for men, for Democrats, for Hollywood, for humankind…. Harvey Weinstein’s mug is literally the poster face of every anti-Semite’s favorite Jew. Fat, ugly, and unkempt. Not to mention greed, narcissism and gross over-indulgence written all over it. Hollywood makeup artists couldn’t have done it any better.”

As a Jew and a man, I am not “embarrassed” by Harvey Weinstein. He doesn’t represent me. Never did. From a distance he looked like someone I wouldn’t ever want to know.

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Brendon O’Neill is a controversial figure; he started out as a Marxist, and ended up a Libertarian. In this video clip, Brendon talks gender fluidity, identity politics, and what he sees as the fragility of identity in modern world. It’s a short video, but it floats some ideas, especially of the fragility and the need […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Los Angeles Says, “Goodbye, Columbus”

 

Today the Los Angeles City Council voted 14-1 to replace the celebration of Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day. Thus, Los Angeles joins a number of other progressive cities including Phoenix, Portland, Seattle, Denver, Minneapolis, Berkeley, and Santa Cruz in kicking Christopher Columbus to the curb in favor of indigenous peoples. The Los Angeles effort was led by Councilman Mitch O’Farrell who is a proud member of the Wyandotte tribe.

I must admit I don’t fully understand the infantile fascination and celebration by progressives of societies and peoples described variously as Native American, Indigenous Peoples, Indians (politically incorrect) or Pre-Columbian Americans (PCA’s) as some sort of numinous people. Mr O’Farrell in making the case for this change stated the following;

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Identity Politics Is Here to Stay

 

One of my reactions to the events in Charlottesville was to chide my liberal friends: See, this is what you get when you embrace identity politics. Do you really want to double down on that? At that moment nothing seemed more obvious than the fact that, when you mainstream ethnic identity politics and insist on politicizing “Whiteness”, as the Left has been doing for more than a generation, both reasonable and unreasonable people will choose to organize politically around white identity. Even some Liberals are coming around to the realization that identity politics is no way to run a railroad.

But two minutes of calm reflection were enough to see that I was being a little unfair. Identity politics is not really the problem. Rather, identity politics is the normal mode of political organization in a multi-ethnic democracy that worships the twin gods, “Diversity” and “Multiculturalism”. Identity politics is our politics, and it’s here to stay. Get used to it.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Week That Was

 

It’s hard to believe that it was only a couple of weeks ago that Jeb Bush called the Trump presidency “exhausting”, thus confirming the “low energy” moniker given him by Trump during the Republican primaries. He continued: “…it feels like the whole world has been turned upside down,” comments reminiscent of the ponderous deficit spending implemented by President George W. Bush in the face of the financial crisis.

But in terms of today’s news cycle Bush’s comments occurred back in the Precambrian era. The week that was featured deadly protests in Charlottesville, a war on history Confederate memorials and to cleanse the palate, a solar eclipse. The Washington Post, where Democracy Dies in Darkness or something, was curiously pro-eclipse. Personally I was unimpressed: it reminded me, if anything, of when my phone transitions to power-saving mode.