Tag: Identity Politics

The Uprising (An Absurdist, Woke Fairy Tale)

 

Franklin Jefferson Grant sipped his early-morning espresso and, wrapped in his warm flannel robe, lay comfortably in his bed with little reason to suspect that the new day might choose to intrude and distract him from his iPad with something unexpected or threatening; even the tingling sensation just under the skin of his toes, though hardly common on Tuesdays, gave him no cause for alarm; and so we may sympathize with his utter astonishment when, upon rereading the fascinating Financial Times article on small growth mutual funds, he should hear the sharp, accusatory cry of “Oppressor!” as his feet turned on him in open revolt.

Now the reader must keep in mind that, except for his two teenage boys, Franklin had no grounds for suspecting absurdity in the universe. Until this particular Tuesday morning, he had been quite content with his life as an egalitarian husband, progressive father, and humble professor of composition and literature. Now he was perturbed, for he sensed his lack of an adequate intellectual foundation for responding to this situation. He cautiously lowered his iPad.

Join Jim and Greg as they expose the insanity of Tennessee Rep. Steve Cohen, who says the National Guard could be a threat to Biden since many of them probably voted for Trump. They also pummel Joe Biden for yet another nomination based solely on identity politics rather than competence. And they also condemn Biden for planning to kill the Keystone XL Pipeline, despite many good reasons for the project to continue.

Calling Things by Their Actual Names

 

In his memoir Fear No Evil, Natan Sharansky recounts his experience at the hands of the Soviet KGB during his years as a refusenik . A favorite tactic of the KGB was to torture prisoners with the intent of getting them to confess to false charges which could be used to justify their imprisonment. In a gripping account of one particularly brutal torture session, Sharansky describes how he was on the verge of breaking down and giving a false confession, when the memory of those who had come before him and refused to lie about themselves suddenly came to his mind. He remembered how his knowledge of the gritty refusal of others to speak untruths had enabled him, up until that moment, to stand up to his own tormentors. The realization came crashing down upon him that if he broke by giving a false confession, he might be doing great damage to those who came after him by failing to provide for them the same example that others had provided for him. That memory, in that terrible moment, was an ultimate game changer for Sharansky — he never did go on to bear witness to a lie.

It turns out that a commitment to the truth can yield surprising downstream effects.

Desi-Rae is a sociopolitical commentator, crypto enthusiast, and artist who started her talk show Just Thinking Out Loud, after she realized she felt conflicted about honestly speaking her mind. Originally from Jamaica, she offers her perspective on US politics, how you used to be able to disagree with someone and still be friends with them, why she hates identity politics, and how people were always assuming what she thought because she’s black. She and Bridget discuss whether being racist or sexist is the worst vice a person can have, the cost of cutting family members out of your life, how victimhood requires constantly looking for oppressors, why we should ask people to learn about the parts of themselves they don’t like, and how everyone in America is rich compared to the rest of the world.

Member Post

 

With some embarrassment, I will admit that I have wasted HUNDREDS of hours on YouTube. Currently, my favorite videos are the “reaction” videos. In this YouTube category, a “YouTuber” will film him or herself watching a movie or listening to a song – supposedly for the first time. Then the Youtuber will “react” to the […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Identity, Modernity, and the State

 

The chief problem of our time is not climate change. It is not police brutality. It is not Donald Trump’s tweeting. It is not even COVID-19. The chief problem of our time, rather, is the problem of identity. Modernity itself cannot answer what may be the most important question any individual could ask himself: Who am I?

The angsty teenager, then, is the modern person par excellence. She knows not who she is — or why she exists, or what she should be doing with her time. Nonetheless, she looks for answers to these questions, and she inevitably finds them in the plethora of subcultures and political movements served up by contemporary society on a silver platter. The social marketplace is as innovative as the economic one, and it provides no shortage of goods for the ravenous consumer. Predictably, the angsty teenager tries (and fails) to resolve her crisis by adopting one of these subcultural identities and conforming to its dictates. Perhaps she dons a spiked collar; perhaps she surrounds herself with healing crystals; perhaps she stretches her earlobes to the size of dinner plates or dyes her hair turquoise; perhaps she lops off her breasts, takes hormones, and rebrands herself as Steve. In all cases, she’s liable to say that she’s “expressing herself.” But what she’s really expressing is membership — membership in a little (or maybe a massive) ad hoc tribe with its own rituals and prescriptions. That is, after all, what it means to “express yourself.”

Another Real Advance in the Culture War Counteroffensive

 

Scale justice TrumpPresident Trump just went from ordering the federal government not to peddle woke lies to leveraging existing law and policy to force all federal contractors to toe the same line. This means no more defense contractors putting their white male employees through reeducation sessions. For a moment, I was worried when I saw the title. Then I started reading and remembered why I voted for Donald J. Trump four years ago, and why I will be working to re-elect him this year. Read and enjoy, emphasis added.

Executive Order on Combating Race and Sex Stereotyping
LAW & JUSTICE Issued on: September 22, 2020

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act, 40 U.S.C. 101 et seq., and in order to promote economy and efficiency in Federal contracting, to promote unity in the Federal workforce, and to combat offensive and anti-American race and sex stereotyping and scapegoating, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Ep. 257 – This week’s episode feature Dave’s interviews at The Real Side Radio; Movie Critic Christian Toto, purveyor at HollywoodInToto.com discusses the controversial Netflix film “Cuties”, Sam Elliott, Burt Reynolds, and the Oscars. At @22:43 Jon Gabriel, Editor in Chief at Ricochet.com discusses the “Harris-Biden Administration” and why Arizona may be big trouble for both President Trump and Senator Martha McSally. At @42:22 Billboard’s Top 40 pop recording artist Ricky Rebel discusses his viral video MAGA (YMCA parody played in full at the end of the interview), and his thoughts on the Lefts’ identity politics.

Libby Emmons and Paulina Enck, joined Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss Harry Potter author and radical feminist J.K. Rowling’s stance against transgenderism. Both Emmons and Enck are contributors at The Federalist, and Emmons also serves as senior editor at The Post Millennial.

Many on the left have recently attempted to cancel Rowling for her recent essay warning against the dangers of the transgender movement. Enck, a long-time Harry Potter fan, defended Rowling’s work as valuable and impactful regardless against Rowling’s personal opinions. Emmons observed there’s a demand for artists and writers to adhere to certain ideological identities, but she argued that their work ought to remain separate. The two also dove into criticisms of cancel culture more broadly.

The Identity Movement’s Battered Wife

 

Anyone familiar with the behavior of abusive husbands recognizes the signature characteristic of the breed, which is an ability to make the victim feel that she, and not her husband, is the one in the wrong — that the abuse is her fault, that she deserves it.

The nation is taking a beating today. Property, public and private, is being destroyed by a self-righteous mob that assures us that this beat-down is the fault of America — of everyone who isn’t as woke as the smashing, looting mob. People are being fired, their careers ruined, for decades-old and trivial “offenses,” fired by employers who are terrified that the mob will turn on their companies next if they don’t instantly vouchsafe their obeisance.

Member Post

 

Hello! I first posted to Ricochet in August of last year but then had to finally give my book the attention it needed to get out the door. After four years of effort, it is done! Below is an excerpt from Vote Like a Grownup: How We Might Reunite as We the People (Kindle and […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

My browser likes to tempt me with clickbait and I couldn’t say no to this review of Sarah Williams Goldhagen’s new book on the psychological effects of our built environments. You should read it too. We are embodied minds, the author believes, and the interdependence of mind and body is something architects should work with, […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Leave it to academics to tell us that the haruspices were basically right, if a little off the mark. Instead of wasting their time inspecting sheep entrails, the Romans should have been poking around the innards of rich white men. Because white people have racist stomachs: Can a person’s belief in racial hierarchy—for example, that […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Yesterday, I came across this post by Christopher Tremoglie at the NRO Corner. August 9th was the 5th anniversary of the justified shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and Democratic Presidential Candidate Elizabeth Warren sent out this tweet in honor thereof; Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

When Did Librarians Get Woke?

 
Local Librarian // Image credit shutterstock.com

What image comes to mind when you think of or hear the word librarian? For me that image is of a conservative person (and truth be told always a woman). By conservative, I refer not to politics or ideology (I imagine librarians have always come in a variety of ideological flavors) but instead of one with a conservative sensibility or temperament which includes a certain respect for tradition and decorum. And, that makes sense (at least to me) for those who are charged with preserving and providing access to a significant portion of our cultural heritage. In recent years, however, that image is fading fast for me.

Juneteenth: Emancipation Day

 

On June 19, 1865, Union Army Major General Gordon Granger read General Orders, Number 3, to the people of Galveston, Texas. It was two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation, but at last the words of freedom came to African-American slaves in Texas. This day became known as Juneteenth, and eventually became first an unofficial holiday and then a holiday recognized by some states.

General Granger wrote, in part:

The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.

Kate Gets Kicked to the Curb

 

I came across this story the other day at Powerline and I thought I’d write about it here at Ricochet. It’s a now all too familiar story, that of a dead white person being expunged from our culture for some real or perceived transgression against one of the pillars of today’s identity politics (those pillars being race and sex). And that most recent transgressor is singer Kate Smith (1907-1986), most well known for her version of Irving Berlin’s “God Bless America“. And what was Ms. Smith’s sin and the punishment therefor? First, the sin. It turns out that way back in 1931 she recorded the song “That’s Why Darkies Were Born”. It was a minor hit, reaching #12 on the Billboard chart. Here’s the song as performed by Ms. Smith;