Tag: Iconoclasm

The Fairfax County School Curriculum, Cancel Culture, and Why You Should Care

 

I think conservatives are starting to understand – in practical terms – exactly what Andrew Breitbart was getting at when he said “Politics is downstream of culture.”

“Cancel Culture” is the direct result of the Right’s elite class turning up its collective nose at the culture fight. Cultural battles, they sniffed, were a “distraction” from the “real issues” … like reforming the Alternative Minimum Tax.

Member Post

 

Ace of Spades links to a recent article at the Federalist by David Marcus, in which he notes of conservatives who have offered little resistance to the toppling of certain statues: [A]fter you write your little op-ed about how of course the evil Confederate statues have to come down, they still think you’re a racist. […]

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After the Cultural Winter

 

Hagia Irene, a church of the Iconoclasm period.

Winter is a time when the earth seems dying and barren. The trees are shorn of their leaves by the howling winds, the ground is shorn of its color by frost or sucking mud. Nothing is growing, nothing seemingly is even changing. From the time the Christmas decorations are dunned away, the world takes on a dreary day to day sameness of cold and damp, relieved on in the forced fits of the crimson blushing of Valentine’s Day, or the unnatural kelly-green of St. Patrick’s Day. When Spring arrives, really arrives despite the occasional frost or last burst of snow, suddenly it is everywhere at once in a thousand flower beds both tended by human hands and otherwise. And then Summer works its way in, when the days are long, golden, and warm with activity.  We can appreciate the Summer all the more by remembering how dreary the Winter before it was.

First Light, Last Light

 

lor_0298959350_0x630_sci_1Take a look at the image on right: that’s the surface of Pluto, as rendered by the New Horizons probe earlier this week. In less than 24 hours, the probe will zip past the diminutive little world, snapping pictures that will put this one to shame (though, sadly, of only one of its sides). Already, we’ve nicknamed features on Pluto that we didn’t know existed and found new mysteries to uncover. Best of all, we’ll have new data to pour over and marvel at for months, if not years, because of the incredibly slow bandwidth available to the probe. So while that image will never be among the best taken of Pluto, it will always be special because it was among the first.

Lion_in_the_garden_of_Palmyra_Archeological_Museum,_2010-04-21Now, contrast that never-before-seen-by-human-eyes image with the one to the left. That is the Lion of al-Lat, a 1st century statue that had survived 2,000 years of war and history — until being intentionally demolished by the Islamic State last month. This is just one example of IS’s spree of destruction, which follows the similar iconoclasm of the Taliban, who famously destroyed the Buddhas of Bamiyan. That picture is important because, sadly, it is among the last ever taken of it.

It’s worth noting that the Islamic State is destroying icons that have not only survived under Islam for more than a millennia, but that were largely cared for and cherished until these atavistic barbarians arrived on the scene. When modern Islamists, however, find themselves with excess explosives and a desire to make headlines, they demolish ancient artifacts, stealing them from history and ensuring they are never again seen by human eyes. Given the same resources, however, we send a piano-sized computer and camera to see things never before viewed by human eyes — and to share those pictures with every human being on the planet.

Member Post

 

I read the news about Our Savior church in New York city, and I pour over emails I’ve received in the past year and it reminds me of the other times I’ve watched a successful traditional parish destroyed. Let’s not pull any bones here — when you read the letter Fr. Rutler wrote when he […]

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