Tag: Hong Kong

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the bravery of people in Hong Kong publicly booing the Chinese national anthem, which can now land you in big trouble under Chinese control. They also turn a scrutinizing eye on the latest leaks from the CDC that supposedly suggest the Delta variant is much worse than previously thought. And they’re not exactly surprised that the federal government – and government at other levels – has botched a program designed to provide rent relief.

Ayaan speaks with Winston Marshall soon after he left the band, Mumford & Sons. They discuss his work helping Hong Kongers integrate into the UK, his interest in speaking up for the Uighurs in China, and much more.

This episode was recorded on June 28th, 2021.

QQ For You and Me: Bubble Tea, Diplomat

 

You may know it as bubble tea, tapioca tea, pearl milk tea, or boba tea. You may not know it at all. But, like popcorn chicken and scallion pancakes, bubble tea is a Taiwanese invention that’s grown to be beloved worldwide. And it’s not just a culinary triumph for the tiny democracy; it’s also become a symbol of important, and strengthening, international ties in the modern age. 

The Apple Daily Is No More

 

Today’s edition will be the last for Hong Kong’s Apple Daily. Police raids, the arrest of top executives, and the harassment of many other employees have brought the paper to the point where, for the safety of hundreds of employees, they felt they could no longer continue. The pressure to toe the Xi line or fold has been ratcheting since China imposed a draconian security law on Hong Kong, abrogating Beijing’s treaty with London when London ceded sovereignty of the island. The fragility of Xi’s rule is underscored by his terror of an honest and free press. More from the Epoch Time.

Bless the management and staff of the Apple Daily, and their leader Jimmy Lai. Their paper is gone, but the fight continues.

Jim and Greg applaud Senate Republicans for standing strong and voting against the partisan election reform bill offered by Democrats. They also blast China for forcing the last remaining pro-democracy newspaper in Hong Kong to close its doors. Finally, they sigh at the news that it will take at least a week or longer to find out who won the Democratic primary for mayor of New York City.

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Join Jim and Greg as they shudder at the extent of Chinese repression on the anniversary of the brutal Tiananmen Square crackdown – not only in China but now in Hong Kong as well. They also discuss the slightly disappointing May jobs report and get a kick out of the hyperbolic reaction on both sides of the aisle. And they laugh as the government issues a new report saying there is no proof that aliens are behind unidentified aircraft and also no proof that they aren’t.

Member Post

 

Biden-linked Totalitarian CCP continues campaign against Jimmy Lai and free speech. After a judge released Jimmy Lai on bail pending a February court date prior to Christmas, a very public campaign of intimidation against the judge saw Jimmy back in custody for the new year. Notice the reverence in Hong Kong for social distancing among […]

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Happy New Year! Jim and Greg conclude the Three Martini Lunch Award season by announcing their choices for person of the year and turncoat of the year. They also make very different predictions about 2021.

Quote of the Day: Jimmy Lai on Hong Kong

 

“When I escaped from China and came to Hong Kong, the contrast was that China was like hell and Hong Kong like heaven. Though I was very poor, I smelled the air of freedom and was full of hope for the future. That’s the way I thought heaven is.” — Jimmy Lai

Jimmy is a Hong Kongese Horatio Alger, arriving penniless in 1995, he made his fortune in the garment industry, going from rags to riches. He developed a reputation for straight-talking and defending liberty, which led him to create the Apple Daily. Under the new CCP oppression of the Hong Kongese, Jimmy and his Apple Daily were targeted. In the latest chapter, Jimmy was denied bail on December 3 and is currently being held under charges of cooperating with foreign powers.

Join Jim and Greg as they offer a rare compliment to the European Union for sanctioning China in response to Beijing’s crackdown in Hong Kong. They also discuss why voting by mail this year could be a gigantic mess and why President Trump musing about delaying the election is also a big mistake. They roll their eyes as Dr. Fauci suggests covering them with goggles or face shields to protect from COVID. And they remember successful businessman and 2012 presidential candidate Herman Cain, who passed away after a battle with COVID.

Join Jim and Greg as they applaud Australia for ending its extradition agreement with Hong Kong and extending visas for Hong Kong residents in Australia over China’s crackdown on freedoms. They also discuss New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman urging Joe Biden to refuse debating President Trump unless Trump agrees to a couple of very unlikely demands. And they wince as CNN’s Don Lemon demonstrates just how little he knows about the most basic tenets of belief for tens of millions of Americans.

A Bittersweet Independence Day

 

This year of 2020, when we Americans should be celebrating American Exceptionalism—the big difference in America’s founding and history from every other nation on Earth—our great country is riven by rioting, looting, Marxism, ugliness, vandalism. Oh, and also a worldwide pandemic of a virus that originated in Communist China.

Instead of the sound of parades, brass bands playing Stars and Stripes Forever, and laughing children; we hear screams, bullhorns, and the rending sounds of toppling monuments. Instead of praise for the Founding Fathers George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and all the others, we hear praise for career criminals and Marxist fugitives.

Member Post

 

I haven’t seen this mentioned anywhere, so I’ll toss it out. I was looking at a map of China today, checking the distance between Wuhan and Guangzhou. It’s about 600 miles. I was curious because I have a shipment of electronic parts being put together in Guangzhou, and I want it to get out before […]

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Glad you’ve joined us for the Monday martinis! Today, Jim and Greg cheer the people of Hong Kong for leaving no doubt in local elections that they are on the side of freedom and the protesters. They also cringe as figures on the right speak of Trump is near messianic terms, a tactic the left engaged in over President Obama for eight years prior to Trump. They’re both way off base. And as Kamala Harris suddenly declares herself a champion of marijuana decriminalization because it leads to mass incarceration, Jim and Greg inconveniently point out her record and her painfully obvious political calculations.

Back to our usual format with three big stories today!  Jim and Greg applaud the Senate for passing legislation designed to sanction anyone found targeting the human rights of people in Hong Kong, but they still wish the demonstrators could get some public support from President Trump.  They also react to U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland contending that the Trump administration did demand Ukraine open an investigation into Burisma and the 2016 elections in exchange for President Zelensky to receive an invitation to the White House, and that he believes the suspension of military aid was linked to those demands as well.  And they marvel at the media deleting a story about the numbers of migrant children in U.S. detention when they learn the figure is actually from the Obama years.

Chad Benson, host of “The Chad Benson Show,” and Greg Corombos of Radio America serve up your Columbus Day martinis while Jim is away basking in a New York Jets victory. They start by getting a kick out of Bernie Sanders once again trying to drag Democrats to the left by telling ABC News the big difference between him and Elizabeth Warren is that she’s a capitalist and he is not. And of course, Bernie once again calls for a political revolution. They also shudder as Chinese President Xi Jinping warns that anyone trying to create divisions in China “will end in crushed bodies and shattered bones” and Chad warns that the U.S. and the rest of the world need to realize that the future will either be dominated by China or the U.S. And they react to the violent video meme depicting Trump mowing down media entities and political opponents and the furor that inevitable followed.

In the Strongest Terms Possible

 

In case of rhetorical emergency, break glass and use the following:

“Today the whole world witnessed [insert bad thing here], and on behalf of [insert your department/organization/government here] we are here to condemn [insert action here or person] in the strongest terms possible.

More likely than not, the only thing that’s possible when you’re using that phrase is using that phrase. It’s a political crutch and has been used for decades and is totally bipartisan in it’s usage. Its origins are unknown, although some like to try to peg it to a Monty Python sketch. (“Dear Sir, I wish to complain in the strongest possible terms about the song you have just broadcast about the lumberjack who wears women’s clothes. Many of my best friends are lumberjacks, and only a few of them are transvestites.”)

NBA’s China Troubles Show Hard Choices Forced Upon American Firms

 

One way to pitch a Hollywood screenplay is by combining two existing works. “Think of it as Wolverine meets Lincoln.” Apparently this actually happens. Anyway, the descriptive technique also pops up elsewhere. The geopolitical tangle — economic, military, ideological — that is China can be expressed as “the Soviet Union meets 1980s Japan.”

Dealing with such a multidimensional challenge is difficult, as the NBA just found out. Its apologetic stance toward China over a Houston Rocket official’s pro-democracy tweet — “Fight for freedom, stand with Hong Kong” — has brought Americans together as few if any recent issues have. The bipartisan outrage over that apology parallels the growing bipartisan consensus that US foreign policy toward China needs a significant course correction.

And American business might be forced to change its ways, too, even if all the tariffs go away. The Hong Kong protests increasingly look like a dystopian film with an authoritarian Goliath vs. democratic David storyline that’s easy for Americans to follow. So, too, the detention of China’s Uighur minority inside reeducation camps is starting to resemble a rerun of the worst bits of the 20th century. It’s one thing for American firms to outsource manufacturing and develop markets in non-democratic China that seems to be following the same road as South Korea toward liberal democracy — but quite another when the endgame might be a totalitarian surveillance state.