Tag: Hong Kong protests

Carrie Lam Speaks (in Cantonese); President Trump Ties to Trade Deal

 

Carrie LamBloomberg cable television carried Hong Kong Chief Administrator Carrie Lam in a live press statement, 10 pm ET. Bloomberg repeatedly notes she is speaking in Cantonese, the native regional dialect. This is both normal and notable. The Chinese Communists have made a concerted global effort to promote their dialect to the world as the true tongue, the original lingua franca, if you will. Lam’s words follow some careful, helpful remarks by President Trump.

It seems that both sides in Hong Kong are climbing down a bit, de-escalating. Lam announced her intent to hire international policing experts to beef up the current monitoring group for the Hong Kong police. She talked about building a platform for dialogue. A bit of oil on the troubled waters.

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The Quiet Ones

 

There are some causes worth speaking out about. And then there are those causes that one dare not utter a word for fear of retribution. Pope Francis and Tim Cook, the CEO of Apple, are quite sympathetic and at times vocal about certain causes – LGBTQ rights, gun violence, diversity, and climate change to name but a few — but they’ve both gotten noticeably quiet about two movements that have surfaced in the past year or so. One that promotes free speech and one that would crush it. One that seeks to live in freedom in one of the great success stories of enterprise and capitalism and the other that seeks to impose communist rule through a blood-soaked revolution.

Clearly, Apple has a great deal to lose if Cook speaks up about the Chinese government’s moves to bring Hong Kong under a more oppressive yoke, taking direct control of Hong Kong’s banking sector, and cracking down on any dissent. The financial hit to Apple would be in the billions if President-for-Life Xi Jinping became upset with a positive statement from Cook about the democracy movement in Hong Kong and ordered that factories where Apple products are manufactured be shuttered.

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Can Trump Solve the Chinese Puzzle?

 

Xi puzzle“Facts don’t care about your feelings,” as Ben Shapiro is wont to say. Indeed, John Adams admonishes us: “facts are very stubborn things.” In the midst of all the virtual ink spillage, and pundit and politico posturing, the inconvenient truth is that Hong Kong is a city in communist China. This unfeeling and stubborn fact fundamentally limits what the United States, any other nation, and people inside Hong Kong can do to affect conditions on the ground. Yet, there may be a move, within the larger Chinese puzzle, that President Trump can play now that might slow Hong Kong’s descent into normal Chinese city status.

Cautionary Tales of Careless Words:

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Member Post

 

UPDATE: Monday, August 12: Please note that I’ve changed the headline for this post. Previous video of troop transports were characterized when posted by their creators on YouTube as entering Hong Kong, when in fact the vehicles are still outside the city in Shenzen which borders it. No credible news sources have indicated at this hour […]

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Member Post

 

The Chinese government might resent it bitterly, but from an American perspective, there is a real fight for freedom going on in Hong Kong and our values put us on the protesters’ side. More

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Disturbing Report Out of Hong Kong

 

It appears that the Communist regime is cracking down on the Hong Kong protesters with goon squads. Not sure this tactic will endear Hong Kong’s citizens to their Beijing overlords. Ever since the proposed extradition law that would send Hong Kong citizens to mainland China for trial and incarceration that was abandoned by the Hong Kong provisional government because of overwhelming protests in the streets, Beijing has been reportedly concerned of similar protests occurring in other Chinese provinces.

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