Tag: History

November 7: National Day for the Victims of Communism

 

On 7 November 2018, Americans dug through election results, slung and deflected stones, and fretted over the future of our country, or not. Almost all of us, including the White House press scrum, failed to note the day’s solemn and deadly significance. But, President Trump did not forget, and he had something to say, worth our reading.

Presidential Message on the National Day for the Victims of Communism
Issued on: November 7, 2018

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House Call: By the Numbers

 

https://www.realpeopletalkingpolitics.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/U.S.-CAPITAL-BUILDING-3.jpgWhat is the real final Democrat count in the House of Representatives? None of the presentations, of election information, make the House situation obvious. They could all use a remedial course in the visual presentation of quantitative information. The RealClearPolitics elections House results page is about the best, but allow me to make the situation really clear, laying out the numbers and then giving the historical context.

Running the Numbers:

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The aftermath of this midterm election has reenergized the perennial “straight ticket” versus “vote for the candidate, not the party” dispute. Some argue that President Trump, apparently uniquely among modern presidents, must be kept in check. Others argue that the Democrat Party has encouraged and condoned political violence and assaults on the fabric of our Constitution, […]

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The overcast sky rested heavily on the landscape on the day we visited Valley Forge. Few people were there on that day, as if they were avoiding a reminder of the chilly autumn season that lay ahead and the brutal memories long past. An admirer of General George Washington during the Revolutionary War, I wanted […]

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S.O.B.

 

Order and Laughter

101 years ago today, my father, Eaton Jackson Bowers, III, known to all as “Jack,” was born. A walking bundle of contradictions, he crackled and sparked with energy like a severed high voltage wire, and had only two speeds: high and asleep. Always impatient but ever dutiful, he loved to travel, but hated change. He dressed impeccably, practiced straight-laced Victorian manners, and kept all his things orderly and polished to perfection. Outwardly he was the grand Southern Gentleman, charming, hospitable and openhanded.

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On Household Relations and the Natural Order of Things

 

There have been a number of posts on Ricochet lately, and many more over time, about relations and dynamics between the sexes, the state of Western Civilization and the role of men and women in it, and how soon the handcart we’re all bouncing around in will reach the gates of Hell (not long) because we’re going about everything so completely wrong nowadays.

I’m not going to try to solve all those problems in this little story. I’m simply going to give you a glimpse of what two people did in their own lives to try to manage the order of household relations, and why, and how it’s worked out for us.

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I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Wednesdays. When it appears, I post the review here on the following Sunday. Book Review ‘Battle of the Brazos’ a fascinating sports and mystery story By […]

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I have some thoughts on the subject over at The Weekly Standard….   More

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I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Wednesdays. When it appears, I post the review here on the following Sunday. Book Review ‘The Woolly West’ examines sheep industry in storied region By MARK […]

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I think I heard the start of this with today’s substitute for Rush on his show so I hope whoever listened for more details can fill them in. Somewhere in the northeast, it was discovered (?) that a group of history teachers were in email contact about making a “pact” to HIDE their liberal progressive […]

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The other day I came across an interesting video at the YouTube page of a fellow called Guy Jones. His page is composed mainly of footage from numerous early newsreels. The video that caught my attention and which is posted below is of Opening Day of the 1931 major league baseball season at Yankee Stadium. […]

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George Orwell Has Moved to Cleveland. (Or Is It Common Sense?)

 

Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped.”

 – George Orwell (1984)

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People wonder all the time why various groups of people do better than other groups of people economically. Some people say its climate. Other people says its religion or ethnic group but those variables fail in explaining economic success. Flat out. It happens to all of us. But before I get into my reasons for […]

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I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Wednesdays. When it appears, I post the review here on the following Sunday. More

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More Golf Ball than Moonscape: The Red Zone in France

 

Serving in Bavaria during the last years of the Cold War, the battalion’s officers took a bus trip to Verdun, for a professional development weekend. The terrain, even in 1988, was a stark, silent testament to the horror that reigned between trenches in the Great War. Moonscape? Try golf ball, for the ubiquity and closeness of deep dimples in the ground. Thirty more years have not erased the scars.

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Summer Reading: What’s In Your Tote?

 

I just finished reading Under the Tuscan Sun by Frances Mayes. I picked it up for 50 cents this past spring at our local library sale. The movie, touted a “chick flick,” is no comparison to this fascinating book.

Frances Mayes is an extraordinary writer because she writes what she thinks and sees – no filters. You can see, taste, and smell the Italian countryside, and many times cringe, with what it’s like to rescue a 300-year-old piece of abandoned foreign history, and rescue a life. Her love of cooking and great recipes make you want to run to the nearest farmer’s market for fresh peaches, crisp fragrant herbs like basil scattered across mozzarella and drizzled with oil from just pressed olives, and roasted hazelnuts.

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Quote of the Day: History

 

“History isn’t just the story of bad people doing bad things. It’s quite as much a story of people trying to do good things. But somehow, something goes wrong.”  – C.S. Lewis

I have been writing about history for over two decades. This quote summarizes most of my writing in three short sentences. That is one reason why — absent Progressive airbrushing of history — C.S. Lewis will be remembered centuries after I am forgotten.

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As someone who spends countless hours staring at nineteenth-century property maps and combing through old county histories, I encounter a lot of names. Hundreds upon hundreds of names — family names, given names, middle names, and nicknames. The variety, even in a place as insular and “unworldly” as pre-World War I Ohio, is almost infinite. […]

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Engineering Failures: St. Francis Dam

 
St. Francis Dam nearly full.

I’ve been fascinated by the St. Francis Dam failure since I first found out about it. For those who are unaware of or who’ve forgotten about it, the St Francis Dam failure, which occurred in 1928, was the greatest civil engineering failure in the United States in the 20th century (the Johnstown Flood killed many more people, but it took place in 1889), and except for the San Francisco Earthquake, caused more deaths than any other event in California history. Until recently, however, it was relatively hard to find much information on the topic. There was a book about the disaster by a local retired rancher, Charles Outland, who had been a high school senior in Santa Paula at the time the St Francis flood waters raged through town, which was published in the early 1960’s, but that was about it. Since then a couple more books have been published and an engineering professor who has extensively studied the failure and developed a detailed analysis thereof has written and given talks on the subject so that it’s now possible to flesh out the subject in great detail (I’ll provide links to the books at the end of this article; all other links will be in the text). The most interesting aspect of the story to me, however, is the way in which this event touches on and impacts so many other stories.

Los Angeles Aqueduct

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Quote of the Day: Late Bloomers

 

The costume of women should be suited to her wants and necessities. It should conduce at once to her health, comfort, and usefulness; and, while it should not fail also to conduce to her personal adornment, it should make that end of secondary importance.

The author of these words, Amelia Jenks Bloomer was born two hundred years ago, on May 27, 1818. After a modest upbringing and a few years spent as a governess, she married attorney Dexter Bloomer, and moved from her native New York to Iowa, where she wrote for several newspapers before starting her own periodical, exclusively for women. The Lily was intended for distribution among the members of another of Amelia’s pet projects, the Seneca Falls Ladies Temperance Society, and was

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