Tag: Hillsdale

Where are Hillsdale’s Touted Conservative Students?

 

I’ve been hanging around Hillsdale’s campus for nearly a month now. I’ve enjoyed watching workers put the finishing touches on Christ Chapel, which is due to be dedicated by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas on October 3rd during the 175th Gala celebration of Hillsdale’s founding. I also attended the Center for Constructive Alternatives (CCA) seminar on Understanding China. As you might expect, the CCA is where you meet the best of America in the speakers, attendees, and ideas. For example, I was able to greet and sit next to Ricochet contributor Professor and Mrs. Rahe at the closing address by Steven Mosher. I often say, being in Hillsdale is like going on a religious pilgrimage. It lifts you up and gives you hope, this little outpost of Western civilization.

In answer to my title question, I would guess Hillsdale’s conservative students are busy studying and excelling in faith, athletics, music, and the visual arts. But, the one place they’re missing is The Collegian newspaper opinion pages. 

No Excuses: Guns and Faith

 

We’ve arrived! My husband and I have taken a road trip, and the first part of our agenda is attending the Couples for Liberty five-day workshop at Hillsdale College—lessons on shooting guns and on understanding the Constitution. We originally signed up for the workshop in May, but we had court dates assigned for the same time and we had to be there. But we found out there were two slots open for Hillsdale’s September workshop. They let us make the switch, and we were delighted–

–until a few weeks ago I realized that Yom Kippur fell during the same week. (I thought I also had a conflict with Rosh Hashanah, but there wasn’t a scheduling problem.)

ACF Middlebrow #6: Paul Rahe

 

The ACF Middlebrow podcast continues with Hillsdale Professor Paul Rahe! We discuss the film he most assigns in class, Coppola and Puzo’s The Godfather, and the perfect introduction for young American college students to the study of different regimes, ancient and modern. We answer the question: How did the Martin Scorsese movie Silence inspire the professor to think about Western politics and the dichotomy between Caesar and Christ? Listen, comment, and share, folks! Please review & rate us on iTunes!

Member Post

 

From February 13th to the 18th, we were in the Phoenix area, for a Hillsdale College National Leadership Seminar. During that week, most days we met with fellow Ricochet Members. For some reason, I was not a picture-taking fool this trip. I have no photos of any of our meetups except the last one, and […]

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[This is the second admirable American I’ve written about. The first was Paul Newman. I’d be pleased to read about who you consider praiseworthy, either in the comments or a post of your own.] I confess, I’m a Larry Arnn groupie. I was in the great man’s presence once and was so overawed, I said […]

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Last week, Ray and I went on the Hillsdale College cruise to Alaska. As far as we know, there was just one other Ricochet member along, and we ended up at the same intimate dinner with Dr. Larry Arnn, the President of the College, and his lovely wife, Penny. Care to guess what the topic […]

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  The lovely Miss Timpf, National Review’s answer to a question most conservatives have most certainly never asked, but could be tempted, if they’re young enough…, has a new post: A couple somewhere in America started a movement to persuade people not to have sex with Trump-supporters–moving all of less than an hundred people, so far so good. […]

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Ray and I had two occasions where we traveled and had one mini and one maxi-meet-up in 2015.  And we had two occasions in town where we met up with fellow Ricochet members.  Here’s who we met, and the occasion.  Those with an asterisk we met for the first time in 2015.  Wherever you go, […]

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Honoring Peter Schramm, American Philosopher and Patriot

 

schramm-at-deskTwo Monday evenings ago, the Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs at Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio, held a tribute for its recently retired executive director, Peter Schramm. It was at once a triumphant, inspiring, and sad occasion. Schramm has recently been diagnosed with an especially aggressive form of cancer.

Under Dr. Schramm’s more than quarter century guidance, Ashbrook has emerged as one of a small number of institutions dedicated to preserving and enlivening a vibrant understanding of the principles of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the American tradition of self-government. Claremont Institute (Schramm was an early president and one of its four founders) in Claremont, Calif. is another of these think tanks and schools. Hillsdale College in Hillsdale, Mich. is one, too.

Schramm’s Ashbrook is, as its website says, “one of the nation’s leading providers of… training for (middle and high school) teachers of American history and government” including a unique-in-the-nation masters program, taught in summers (and online during the school year). Before the evening tribute I sat in on a class session. It focused on a passage in Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography that described a small reading group Franklin assembled of tradesmen like himself. These friends of Ben ultimately comprised the core founders of the nation’s first public library. Listening to the class discussion led by Professor Christopher Flannery, another Claremont founder, this momentary student felt he was coming to a new appreciation of the warp and woof of a free and self-governing society  – the kind of society where, as Alexis de Tocqueville wrote four decades after Franklin, people organized themselves to fill community needs, not waiting for government to step in.

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At my mom’s funeral I was catching up with a relative I haven’t seen in years. His politics are unknown to me, except he’s obviously not a movement conservative. I told him I was urging my teen son to attend Hillsdale. My relative could not completely suppress his smirk. He made some bland comment about […]

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