Tag: Henry V

Qotd: Prince Hal to Henry V

 

Presume not that I am the thing I was!—William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2

The character speaking here is the newly crowned Henry V. As “Prince Hal,” he had endured and even enjoyed low company. He has known all of his kingdom’s rascals and rogues. But now he is king. He is a new-made thing, who is now in charge of enforcement of the law, and because of his misspent youth, he knows just where the heavy hand of the law should bear down.

Member Post

 

On this day (variously given as March 20 and March 21, and making the usual allowances for the Julian Calendar discrepancy), 605 years ago, Henry of Monmouth, Prince of Wales, became King Henry V of England. And it’s a jolly good thing, too. Not only did he rule well in both domestic and foreign affairs, […]

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Member Post

 

Akira Kurosawa is the most famous of the Japanese directors & one of the directors with an acknowledged, plausible claim to title, greatest director. This is a difficult thing to decide. We have to consider that & why he admired John Ford. If people who admire Kurosawa are right about him, that would suggest John Ford […]

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Resolved: Henry V was a Vicious, Evil Warmonger

 

3D_Judges_Gavel

Today, the 25th of October — St. Crispin’s Day — marks the 600th anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt. In 1415, in a small French village, the forces of the English crown, under the command of King Henry V,  decisively defeated a much larger French army; and in doing so reignited the Hundred Years War in northern France. This war was to cripple France for a generation.

The battle of Agincourt today is mainly remembered for two reasons. First, for the decisive use of the English longbow by Welsh and English archers, which decimated the ranks of the French forces. The famous two fingered V salute is allegedly came from this battle. The second, of course, is the infamous play by William Shakespeare, Henry V. The play sanitizes Henry V, and turns him into a hero of English literature, allowing him to steal the show with a magnificent, rousing speech that touches all Englishmen’s hearts.