Tag: Healthcare

Powerline’s Steven F. Hayward

 

Steven Hayward joins us at Whiskey Politics to discuss Trump, Russia, the media’s double standard, North Korea, his insider’s perspective of UC Berkeley, single payer healthcare in California, Theresa May and the British election, and of course, James Bond, 007.

Steven F. Hayward is currently senior resident scholar at the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley and a visiting lecturer at Boalt Hall Law School. He was previously the Ronald Reagan Distinguished Visiting Professor at Pepperdine University’s Graduate School of Public Policy, and was the inaugural visiting scholar in conservative thought and policy at the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2013-14. From 2002 to 2012 he was the F.K. Weyerhaeuser Fellow in Law and Economics at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington DC, and has been senior fellow at the Pacific Research Institute in San Francisco since 1991.

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Member Post

 

Much of the reason Conservatives and Libertarians have trouble making any headway with sound economic policy is one of framing. Someone says they want to reduce or even simply not raise the minimum wage and suddenly they are “anti-poor,” or something. The two main reasons liberals have the upperhand are “social desirability bias” and “diffuse […]

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Healthy, Wealthy, and Unwise

 

On the last of this week’s podcasts, Noah Rothman and John Podhoretz (Abe Greenwald is out) try to explain what on earth happened to make it possible for the House to pass a health-care bill and whether this is good news for Republicans or terrible news. (Answer: Both! Neither! Who knows!) Meanwhile, Hillary Clinton reemerges to take full responsibility for losing the election and then turns around and blames James Comey, misogyny, the media Russia, and blue cheese (John made up that last one). Give a listen.

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Member Post

 

Titled Repeal and Piecemeal: A Better Obamacare Strategy, Dan MacLaughlin’s guide at National Review for addressing the problems of Obamacare takes the basic strategy many of us have demanded for years and lays out it out in better detail. I’m particularly fond of MacLaughlin’s call to legislative humility.  More

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Member Post

 

Why is it taking so long for the Republicans to repeal and replace Obamacare? It turns out that many Republicans like key Obamacare provisions, such as the Medicaid expansion and the restrictions on how insurance companies can factor in the health of their clients. Obamacare Republicans More

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Reprinted from an email to my Congressman, Ted Poe, who broke with the Freedom Caucus (perhaps rightly) to support Speaker Ryan’s healthcare bill: Please explain to your constituents in a public letter why you supported the AHCA. In that letter, you might address the follow points. More

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A very liberal friend of mine forwarded this article to me. It seems to be the only communication she has with me – sending stories like this. So, is there any truth in here?  https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/27/opinion/the-all-male-photo-op-isnt-a-gaffe-its-a-strategy.html?_r=0 More

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Former President Trump

 

Please hit the tip jar! And please give us 5 stars on iTunes! Don’t know how? It’s easy: directions here.

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for March 28, 2017, it’s the Former President Trump edition of the show. Brought to you this week by Casper Mattresses.

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The Medicalist (or, Looking for the Pony) No. 4

 

ON THE DIMINISHED STATE OF THE MEDICAL PROFESSION

Note to fellow Ricochet members: I have had to take my Ricochet account back from Dr. Publius at this time. As it happens this post (Number 4 of Dr. P’s Medicalist papers), was inadvertently leaked, prior to publication, to a physician colleague, who took umbrage. Regrettable words were subsequently exchanged between Dr. P and this unnamed colleague (obviously, on a site with a less restrictive CoC than one finds here), and as a result the two have agreed to settle the matter in the way of gentlemen, on the Field of Honor. 

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I just finished reading a news piece by Philip Klein in the Washington Examiner titled, “GOP healthcare fight becoming battle over senate procedure. GOP Healthcare Fight Becoming Battle Over Senate Procedure More

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What parts of Republican healthcare reform can be implemented independently of others? What can be done immediately and without a comprehensive bill? For example: Is there any reason Republicans cannot enable selling of insurance across state lines without reference to any other change?  More

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It is a fundamental law of economics that when we buy consumable products that we are consuming ourselves — things like 4K televisions, ocean cruises, sports cars, hamburgers, and healthcare — we must not spend more on those consumables than we can pay ourselves. If individuals could decide to, say, go on a cruise whenever […]

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Where Affordable, Altruistic Healthcare Goes to Die

 

As conservatives, we’re never surprised by news that Obamacare hasn’t fixed the nightmares facing the typical American confronted with medical bills. Nor are we surprised when Obamacare only makes them worse. A few years ago, Jim Epstein at Reason predicted the demise of health-sharing ministries at the hands of Obamacare’s subsidized exchanges. The good news is that Epstein was wrong: Membership in health-sharing ministries has only grown as frustration with commercial prepaid plans under the Affordable Care Act continues to mount. According to the New York Times,

[M]embership in sharing ministries has more than doubled over the last six years, to 535,000 from about 200,000, according to the Alliance of Health Care Sharing Ministries.

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So, Should We All Get Women Doctors?

 

As you undoubtedly have heard by now, an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association this week says that female doctors have better results than males. Our legitimate news media (the ones who eschew fake news and only go with the real stuff) summarize the JAMA findings with informative headlines like, “Female Doctors May Be Better Than Male Doctors,” (The Atlantic), “Female Doctors Save More Lives,” (Science Magazine), “Women Really Are Better Doctors,” (Washington Post), and “Replace Male Doctors With Female Ones” (LA Times). I am partial to this latter headline, as it not only states the news, but also provides an action plan.

As a male doctor, you might think I would take umbrage at such a ridiculous notion. But I do not. I am foremost a scientist, and I will follow the science wherever it may lead, whatever that might mean to my own personal prestige or self-image. So let us have a look at the science, and consider its implications. For, if we are all better off having women doctors, we had better figure that out quickly so we can get in line.

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President Trump

 

Richard Epstein shares his reaction on learning that Donald Trump will be the 45th president and provides recommendations for the new administration’s policy agenda.

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Why Isn’t Obamacare Working? An examination of the recent Health & Human Services brief reveals soaring costs, fewer choices for consumers, and no solution in sight. Health Insurance Premiums Rise, Insurers Quit The White House released a brief stating that health insurance premiums for states using the federal HealthCare.gov exchange for “Obamacare” plans will increase […]

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I recently came across this piece in favor of abortion and was genuinely upset by one thing. The traditional liberal slogan of the last 2 decades “safe legal and rare” has been replaced by the genuinely disturbing “safe legal and prevalent” and the tone seems to indicate that this is a good thing. The header […]

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Unaffordable Care Act

 

Barack ObamaThe defenders of the Affordable Care Act are running out of excuses for the dismal performance of its health care exchanges. It is now old news that many uninsured individuals are unable, even with sizeable subsidies, to purchase health care coverage from private health care providers. As Yale Professor Jacob Hacker notes in his recent op-ed for the New York Times, the ACA has indeed faced “a rocky six months.” Average anticipated premium increases are running at 25 percent; major insurers like Aetna, UnitedHealth, and Humana have either pulled out of the program entirely or cut back their operations; and one recent tally reports that 16 of the 23 health care co-ops, with over 800,000 enrollees, have shut down, with at least six others on economic life support.

What should be done to respond to this unfortunate situation? The defenders of the ACA want to double-down on the current system by introducing a “public option” that was excluded from the original legislation. President Obama endorsed that position in a communication published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association. After ignoring the problems with the individual health care exchanges, he suggests “Congress should revisit a public plan to compete alongside private insurers in areas of the country where competition is limited. Adding a public plan in such areas would strengthen the Marketplace approach, giving consumers more affordable options while also creating savings for the federal government.” That same line is echoed by Hacker who dismisses any notion that the public option will lead to a single-payer system, by making the tart observation that the wholesale withdrawal of private insurers from the marketplace has already resulted in a single-payer system in the five states whose exchanges will be serviced by only a single ACA provider next year, with the prospect of still more to come.

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