Tag: Healthcare

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For those unfortunate enough to be “covered”* by an ACA insurance plan, paying cash at an out-of-network practice, apparently, constitutes an act of fraud. Never mind that a thousand financial-planning websites advocate exactly this practice. No, it’s fraud. Evil. Contemptible. Horrible. Hideous. A family member of mine learned this great, undeniable truth recently, after she […]

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Member Post

 

Please read the following article from The Heritage Foundation; it’s not terribly long and is the basis for my mini-rant. Thank you. More

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. From Commodity to Transformation: How Selling Coffee Points the Way to the Future of Healthcare Delivery and Why it is So Hard to Get Right

 

In his 2006 book The Starbucks Experience: 5 Principles for Turning Ordinary Into Extraordinary, Joseph A. Michelli outlines how Starbucks takes a service (preparing coffee) and turns into an experience, a transformation that has not been without struggles and has proven difficult to maintain over time.

In the book, Michelli outlines the hierarchy of sales, showing that the highest margins are from those sales based on experience, using coffee as an example:

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. My Experience with the VA

 

On Monday I went to visit my parents back in Ohio. Mom and dad are now in a nursing home. Dad needed me to take him to the VA to get his hearing aids checked and repaired — I hadn’t been able to talk on the phone with him for a month, and finally found out his hearing aids were “broken.”

This particular VA office (On Waterloo Road in Akron) had open hours of Mondays and Tuesdays, 9–11 am. No appointment was necessary — just walk in (or in my dad’s case, roll in). I was ready to settle in for a daylong wait.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. What Your Hospital CEO Is Thinking: A Reality Check and Rebuttal

 

Ms. Amy Schley made an interesting post that seemed to spur some conversation on cost-based health care services. Due to her increasing legal experience working on memos for a hospital, she let us in for a little behind the scenes peek at what some of her bosses’ emails had taught her. For one, I’m glad that people are thinking about healthcare once again.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. “The Resident” Should Be Allowed to Die a Natural (Swift) Death

 

Always one to watch and critique medical dramas, I sat down with a beer to watch the newest entry to the genre. “The Resident” is the Fox network’s answer to other edgy shows that promote liberal agendas.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Addiction, Homelessness, and Healthcare

 

I’m really tired today after coming off of working three days in a row. That may not seem like a lot to the regular work-a-day folks, but when you’re in healthcare, the hours are often long and arduous. I’ve worked about 40 hours in the past three days, and I work in a busy Emergency Department in Portland, OR. Every day that I worked, the ED was on divert — meaning ambulances were directed to not come to us because we were so busy.

When I left work last night, there were 30 patients in the waiting room. Many had been waiting three to five hours just to be put in a room; the wait time to see a physician after being roomed was even longer. Staff scurried about looking haggard, pulled in a million directions. At one point I counted 17 patients in the department that had been admitted to inpatient services waiting for a bed, but since the hospital was full they continued to board in the ED. Multiple patients were there with mental health crises that had landed them with psych holds.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Wards of the State: Social Responsibility

 

In difficult times, we may turn to the rigid rules of the government. It is then that we realize that things are not so simple. When we age, if we are incapacitated without a designated next of kin, we could become a Ward of the State. That should be on every adult’s list of horrors.

Being a Ward of the State means that it takes a judge’s order to define certain life states and procedures. You are not your own person because you have no people to fight for you. Anyone with any sense should fear this future.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Intentional Transmission of HIV: OK in CA!

 

I cannot believe that I live in a state like this.

Governor Brown and his lackeys have determined that intentionally transmitting HIV is only a misdemeanor. Transmission of a life-altering, and eventually life-ending, disease has now been demoted to an afterthought.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A Sellout, A Hypocrite or Worse, Part II: A Lament

 

In what I thought was a couple years ago, but find was nearly six years ago, I posted about my dilemma at the time: I was renting, married with four children and employed full-time, but couldn’t afford the employer-offered healthcare product(s) for my entire family. I had trouble reconciling myself as a bona fide right-winger (much farther to the right of the average Ricochetto or Ricochetta), and the idea of enrolling my children onto Wisconsin’s Badgercare program, the local Medicare services. The response was positive, agreeing with my findings that the market had been horribly affected by the continuing horrendous idea of having healthcare given by employers, rather than via private providers as we do for all other insurance products.

I’ve since moved companies twice; in 2015 I started working for a company that ultimately let me go this past August (it wasn’t a good fit from the start, and I can’t blame them too much). I start with a new company at the end of October, at a higher-than-expected (and higher-than-before) rate of pay: I don’t mind telling you, via the anonymity of Ricochet, that I’ll be making $60k, quite a good salary here in “north-east” Wisconsin (Oshkosh – Appleton) area in the Retirement Plan Administration industry (compliance testing, government reporting, ERISA expertise for 401(k)s, 403(b)s, old style “pension” plans, etc.).

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Contra Caplan on Physical Illness, Too

 

In 2006, insouciant economic imperialist Bryan Caplan published a paper outlining a consumer-choice model of mental illness designed to rehabilitate the anti-psychiatry of Thomas Szasz. Caplan claimed this model shows that mental illness should not to be understood as a “real illness” (and therefore as a matter for medical rather than moral treatment) at all, but that mental illness should be understood as a weird preference rational actors persist in despite their preference being a poor match for functioning in society.

From the perspective of Caplan’s model, mental-health treatment is a form of rent-seeking designed to paper over the interpersonal conflicts that arise when somebody won’t relinquish a preference grievously at odds with society, rent-seeking that, on the one hand, provides the “mentally ill” with official-sounding excuses for their weird preferences while, on the other hand, providing the families of the “mentally ill” with medical justification for treating sufficiently “ill” family members against their will. In October 2015, the blogger Scott Alexander, himself a psychiatrist, published “Contra Caplan on Mental Illness”, an essay pointing out why, from his perspective, it seems so strange to call mental illness merely a weird preference. Given Caplan’s framework, I would like to point out how strange it is to call physical illness not a “weird preference”, albeit a weird preference most of us take pity on out of belief that it arises from physical derangement that we don’t expect sufferers to be able to compensate for completely.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Stuff Medicare Says

 

I recently had a terrible experience with my mom being an “Observation” patient in the local CHW hospital, St. Joseph’s of Orange (Yes, it was so bad, I’m naming names. I hope it comes up in a Google search). Observation means that unlike real patients, you are effectively still an ER patient, simply with a floor bed to relieve the room in the Emergency Department. Observation also limits your rights under Medicare.

That’s right. If you’re over 65, Observation status is basically a way that the hospital gives you only slightly more care than you’d have at home while charging you hospital fees.

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In this AEI Events Podcast, AEI’s Joseph Antos hosts health policy experts to discuss Medicare’s fiscal health following the release of the 2017 Medicare Trustees report. Paul Spitalnic, chief actuary at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, delivers the keynote address, in which he summarizes the report and discusses its implications on the future of Medicare.

In the following panel discussion, topics include the value of lifetime Social Security and Medicare benefits and taxes at different ages, the competition in the Medicare system and the possibility of a more private system than we have seen in the past, and the role of the Congressional Budget Office in the Medicare reform challenge. Panelists are comprised of Keith Fontenot (Hooper, Lundy & Bookman, PC), Maya MacGuineas (Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget), Robert Moffit (Heritage Foundation), and Eugene Steurle (Urban Institute). The conversation is moderated by AEI’s Joseph Antos.

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Member Post

 

In a couple of weeks, I am going to be released from my job, laid off, made redundant, let go. Whatever you want to call it. Technically, my status is being changed to “part-time casual” which translates to “we’ll keep you on the payroll and we’ll call you when we need your expertise but we […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. What Government Run Healthcare Looks Like

 

Michael P. Ramirez

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud Republicans for backing Attorney General Jeff Session even in the midst of President’s Trumps invective against him, including the warning from Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley that there is no time left in 2017 to consider another person as attorney general. They express their continuing disgust as six Senate Republicans who voted to repeal Obamacare in 2015 refused to do so now. And they fume as former House Majority Leader Eric Cantor admits Republicans never believed they could repeal Obamacare if they took back control of Congress but used voter anger and expectations to win elections. Finally, rumors are swirling that former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer might join the cast of the ABC reality show, Dancing With the Stars.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud a federal appeals court for striking down the District of Columbia’s policy of requiring a “good reason” for allowing resident to conceal carry their guns. They also welcome back John McCain and the start of the health care debate but lament how tough it will be to pass a good bill and McCain’s castigation of everyone for the Senate gridlock. And they marvel at the lack of media coverage as a top IT expert for former DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz and several other Democratic lawmakers is arrested for bank fraud while trying to leave the country and the FBI looks into hard drives demolished by hammers.

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It’s a very special late July episode of HWX, with Brian Ward and Paul Happe reconvening to discuss the critical issues of our times. Topics addressed include:
After 63 successful votes to repeal Obamacare while there was a Democrat in the White House, the Republicans strike out in their first attempt while having a President who might sign something. How does this happen? We break it down. Plus, the latest installment of This Week in Alternative Never Trump History. What might have happened if Hillary won?

It’s been the summer of Russia in Washington and in the media. We discuss how we got here and what it all means. Plus exclusive, just leaked audio which may finally prove the connection between Donald Trump and Russian hackers.

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On the second of this week’s podcasts, John Podhoretz asks Abe Greenwald and Noah Rothman whether the health-care debacle this week is simply a reflection of the same pressures on the conservative coalition Donald Trump saw and conquered by running for president last year–and what it will mean for him and them that he has provided no rallying point for Republican politicians. And then they discuss OJ Simpson. Give a listen.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America endure three bad martinis today as two more GOP Senators bail on the plan to overhaul Obamacare and a new effort to vote on a clean repeal is already in grave danger of failing. They criticize President Trump for keeping Obama’s infamous Iran Nuclear Deal without giving his advisers enough time to develop a new policy. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is another source of disappointment today as he declares his intention to increase the use of civil asset forfeiture, which allows the federal government to seize the property of suspected criminals — without charging them with a crime.

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