Tag: Healthcare

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Have you ever considered how your privacy could be violated through the use of your DNA? Florida legislators have taken this danger seriously by being the first state to expand on federal laws protecting the use of DNA testing results: ‘Given the continued rise in popularity of DNA testing kits,’ Sprowls said Tuesday, ‘it was imperative […]

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Surgery, Regulations, and the Rainbow Connection

 

Actually, the latter topic is much more pleasant than the former two, so let’s start with the Muppets. The Rainbow Connection was the theme song for The Muppet Movie, back when there was only one Muppet movie and the title could afford to be general. Kermit the Frog is sitting in a swamp playing a banjo singing that song. A hopelessly lost talent scout wanders by; Kermit corrects his path. In return, the talent scout tells this frog he may have a chance in Hollywood. And so Kermit sets out on a journey.

Why are there so many songs about rainbows? What’s on the other side?
Rainbows are visions but only illusions; rainbows have nothing to hide.

This week on JobMakers, Host Denzil Mohammed talks with Dr. Babak Movassaghi, founder of InfiniteMD (acquired last summer by ConsumerMedical), which connects patients with top U.S. medical professionals through second-opinion video consultations, guiding patients to better care. When the world shut down due to COVID-19, Dr. Movassaghi’s company was already prepared to serve patients via telehealth. In this episode, they discuss his fascinating pivot from physics and professional football in Germany, to healthcare and innovation here in the U.S., an extension of his ability to navigate multiple identities as an Iranian-German living the American Dream.

Guest:

Magnet(TM), Clinical Ladder, and Hospitals: Getting More for Less

 

Glowing nurses. So diverse. Young, old. Thanks to nursingworld.org for the picture that I borrowed.

Today, I’m going to write one of the most controversial professional articles in nursing. If one goes to Duck Duck Go and searches “Magnet hospitals” or “Clinical ladder for nursing”, one will see nothing but article upon article about professional advancement. Even going back 10 years, there are many websites devoted to how Clinical ladder programs (CLPs) make for “better nurses” and “better hospitals”. There are many articles about programs at different hospitals. There are pictures of glowing nurses, talking about their blessed profession, talking about how fulfilled they are by being able to give more. It helps them to become better nurses and make better hospitals.

I’m going to share a secret: it doesn’t.

Host Joe Selvaggi talks with surgeon and New York Times bestselling author Dr. Marty Makary about the healthcare reform themes in The Price We Pay, the 2020 Business Book of the Year.  The discussion covers the value of price transparency, provider accountability, and performance information to drive better medical outcomes and improve doctor and patient satisfaction.

Guest:

Advice from A Nurse on “Advocacy”.

 

I have been called kind, compassionate, caring, “a wonderful asset to our team,” and an “excellent and experienced nurse.”

I have also been called: “Nurse Ratched,” a demon, “b*tch,” and a “bag of C****.” I’ve been called other things that I really can’t even type out because removing the profanity will make them incomprehensible and some, well, some were not in English.

America, We Have to Talk About Death

 

America is generally a pretty optimistic country.  It makes sense.  We are a people that came from distant shores to join the people born here to create a wonderful mishmash that holds certain Truths to be Self-Evident.  People who did not believe in these common truths would not have survived here or stayed here.  This would not be the land they chose to raise children.  They would flee for easier paths.  I know, America, it’s been a rough 200 years or so.  We’ve been through a lot together.

We have done so much to foster life in this country.  We have developed spectacular, truly spectacular, medical advancements that have propelled us into the higher life expectancies.  We discovered hand washing (at least in the sense that it was totally necessary in medical care).  In 1879, we created the vaccine for cholera.  In 1902, an American (Karl Landsteiner) developed ABO blood typing.  Paul Zoll invented the first cardiac pacemaker in 1952.  These are such wonderful innovations!  We have sustained life in so many complex cases that used to be fatal.  There were no treatments for the disease, just the symptoms.  People used to suffer needlessly because we did not have the technology to help them.

Joe Selvaggi talks with Pioneer Institute Senior Fellow Josh Archambault about his newest research paper entitled, “Direct Health Care Agreements: A New Option For Patient-Centered Care That Costs Less and Reduces Provider Burn-out” and how this emerging service model provided its patients with comprehensive health service throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

Guest:

Join Host Joe Selvaggi as he discusses with Harvard Professor Bob Blendon his New England Journal of Medicine Special Report, “Implications of the 2020 Election for U.S. Health Policy,” which covers broad differences in both parties’ view of the role of government in healthcare and what the election results will mean for Americans.

Guest Interview:

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Touted as a way to allow international travel to resume before a COVID-19 vaccine is widely available, ‘CommonPass‘, a new app designed to be a clearance mechanism for airline passengers, has already been tested on two flights. Call me a skeptic, but I for one am fairly certain there is waaay more to the agenda behind […]

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Join host Joe Selvaggi and his guest Dr. Bill Smith as they discuss the complex incentive structure between drug manufacturers, health plans, and pharmacy benefit managers. In this episode, they focus on how drug rebates work and how a system intended to optimize value may actually deliver higher costs and fewer choices. Joe and Bill also use this framework to speculate on the price of a COVID-19 vaccine, and who will likely pay for it.

Guest:

Join Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi as he speaks with Firefly Health President Fay Rotenberg and Primary Care Doctor and Co-Founder Jeff Greenberg as they discuss the promise and potential of virtual primary care to deliver direct doctor access, price transparency, and more holistic healthcare that may revolutionize the healthcare system.

Guests:
Jeff Greenberg, MD, MBA is primary care physician and Firefly Health co-founder. Jeff spent nearly a decade practicing primary care at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He obtained his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania and is on faculty at Harvard Medical School.

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A group of oncologists estimate that 60,000 people in the UK will die of cancer because they were unable to get adequate treatment due to COVID-19 restrictions. I am torn about what to think about this estimate. Why should one trust the prognostications of a group of oncologists any more than one trusts the prognostications […]

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I clicked onto Fox News website this morning to get a quick news update. The column on the right had an ad called The COVID Tracking Project. It says it is run by volunteers. The ad on right column showed a United States map and a box below it giving me the Florida statistics. I […]

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Как дела Мистер Пу?: The Politics of Coronavirus in Russia

 

This should be a weekend of parades and celebrations all over Russia, especially in Moscow and the former Leningrad, as citizens rush to celebrate their nation’s part in the Великая Отечественная война (the generally used Russian term for WWII, which marks the dates 1941-45, and is usually translated into English as The Great Patriotic War, although The Great War for the Fatherland is an equally valid interpretation, closer to the meaning of the adjective). It should especially be a time of celebration for one Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin, who for the last 20 years has never missed a chance to parade the streets of Petersburg with a framed photo of his veteran father, along with tens of thousands of other Russians. There will be no ceremonies this weekend, and Mr. Putin has fewer and fewer causes to celebrate. 

The situation in Russia has received relatively shallow coverage in the West. Vladimir Putin is a man who built his claim to legitimate authority on his strength, on reasserting the power of Russia in the world as the eyes of most security analysts and Western leaders, which had for the past half-century been focused so heavily on Russia, turned towards the Middle East and Asia as the main centers of coming conflict and rising greatness. Putin, by symbolically rooting out the corruption that has plagued post-Soviet politics (and replacing it with cronies of his own) and making advances into ‘rightfully’ Russian territory in places like Crimea, has attempted to recapture the pride of the Great Patriotic War, which remains one of the few largely uncontroversial focuses of Russian patriotism in the 21st century. But a global pandemic does not have recognizable border divides or command tanks and ground forces, and in a state which has thrown the bulk of its resources behind military expenditure and industry, Vladimir Putin is beginning to struggle. 

Self-Medication in a Time of Plague

 

Chloroquine has been mentioned widely as a treatment for COVID-19 and President Trump recently mentioned it favorably. There is some in vitro science and mechanistic support for this use (it exhibits antiviral properties against both SARS and COVID-19 coronaviruses), demonstrated clinical utility in SARS, and shows promise in use against COVID-19.

Like many human drugs, it also has veterinary use, and one example of this has hit the headlines. Not only have the usual MSM sources done their usual sterling job of reportorial misfeasance and malfeasance, (combined with Blame Trump, of course) the conservative snarkitariate has been spreading the fake news, demonstrating the wisdom of the old advice to engage brain before putting mouth in gear.

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One of our Resistance Library readers reached out to us recently and shared a BBC article that they found interesting. They said it reminded them of our piece Prescription For Violence: The Corresponding Rise of Antidepressants, SSRIs & Mass Shootings and thought it supported some of the connections made there.   They’ve been linked to road rage, pathological gambling, and […]

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