Tag: Health Care Reform

Juneteenth: Emancipation Day

 

On June 19, 1865, Union Army Major General Gordon Granger read General Orders, Number 3, to the people of Galveston, Texas. It was two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation, but at last the words of freedom came to African-American slaves in Texas. This day became known as Juneteenth, and eventually became first an unofficial holiday and then a holiday recognized by some states.

General Granger wrote, in part:

The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.

What Your Hospital CEO Is Thinking: A Reality Check and Rebuttal

 

Ms. Amy Schley made an interesting post that seemed to spur some conversation on cost-based health care services.  Due to her increasing legal experience working on memos for a hospital, she let us in for a little behind the scenes peek at what some of her bosses’ emails had taught her.  For one, I’m glad that people are thinking about healthcare once again.

On the other hand, I’m extremely disappointed in where this conversation inevitably goes.  People with no experience in actual hospitals gather together to discuss how horrible it is that hospitals just can’t work as a business.  “Why, outpatient facilities are able to do the same job for cheaper!”  “Why should anyone pay more for something they can get for less?!?”  “This is why healthcare is so messed up in this country!”

In this AEI Events Podcast, AEI’s Tim Carney hosts a panel discussion regarding whether obtaining medical care from trained health care professionals who are not doctors, such as nurses and nurse practitioners, could drive down costs. The panel of economists and medical professionals discuss this issue of regulation, safety, and economic opportunity, and conclude with a discussion of the role for new innovations, such as telemedicine, in the future of health care.

Panelists include Benedic N. Ippolito (AEI), Cindy Cooke (American Association of Nurse Practitioners, and R. Shawn Martin (American Academy of Family Physicians).

In this AEI Events Podcast, AEI’s Thomas Miller hosts a group of experts gather to begin a series of conversations regarding emerging topics in health policy research, particularly the role of health savings accounts (HSAs) to reduce costs and improve outcomes.

Mr. Miller begins the event by discussion how HSAs fit within the contemporary health policy debate. In the following panel discussion, topics include how HSAs work in practice, how certain policy measures could aid in leveraging these accounts, how HSAs boost enrollment in small group health plans, and how they may capture the benefit conferred by the federal tax treatment of health insurance. Panelists include Jinqi Ye (Huazhong University of Science and Technology), Roy Ramthun (HSA Consulting Services), and Lauren Roth (St. John’s University School of Law). The discussion is moderated by Thomas P. Miller (AEI).

Member Post

 

I am typing this on a computer with more computing power than anything in the world until a about decade ago.  When I was born, government agencies would literally kill for this computer – it would be a major advantage in the Cold War.  Yet I could buy this on a limited budget several years […]

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City Journal associate editor Matthew Hennessey and Manhattan Institute senior fellow and health policy director Paul Howard discuss the current state of Obamacare, Republican options for reforming the health care system, and legislation in Congress designed to overhaul the FDA and improve drug development.

City Journal is a magazine of urban affairs, published by the Manhattan Institute.

Member Post

 

We have two people who are vying for leadership of our country. One is the standard bearer of the previous administration, who promises to bring the current situation that are country is in, full circle. She has promised to in fact, to expand on it. There have been serious questions regarding trust, honesty, integrity and […]

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Member Post

 

  I give up.  Despite it’s being the right thing to do, we aren’t going to be able to reform health care to introduce market reforms in which services would be priced appropriately due to consumers making their own risk vs benefit tradeoffs.    Who is to blame?  Netflix, Apple Music, and Amazon Prime movies […]

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Rubio, Walker Release Plans to Slay the Obamacare Dragon

 

Marco-Rubio-Scott-WalkerAs Peter Suderman writes in Reason any Republican effort to repeal and replace ObamaCare is likely going to be disappointing, given both the enormity of the task and the fact that they’ll be starting with a ball further down left field than when the President took office.

Still, there’s room to maneuver and maybe even to reverse the ratchet in a few areas. Last week, Sen. Marco Rubio and Gov. Scott Walker issued fairly similar plans that attempt to do just that (Walker issued a short white paper; Rubio wrote an op-ed for Politico that sketches his ideas, albeit with fewer details).

After repealing ObamaCare, both plans start by removing the single greatest inanity of our system: that insurance purchased through one’s employer is tax-free, while insurance purchased directly is not. This system is virtually unique in the world — a bad example of American exceptionalism if ever there was one. Moreover, making it easier for people to purchase insurance directly not only removes an extraneous layer from the healthcare system but also will reduce a major source of governmental intrusion (i.e., Hobby Lobby).

Member Post

 

I came across this year-old article from ‘The New Republic’ magazine: http://www.newrepublic.com/article/116105/dear-michael-moore-obamacare-first-step-toward-single-payer (The first comment has a clickable version of this link) Basically, it argues that the PPACA law creates a constituency and a rationale for a single-payer plan. I think he’s probably right, and therefore I wonder what Republicans can do to avert this. […]

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