Tag: Harvard

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I was reminded again this weekend that background to a situation should superintend journalistic reporting on a matter. Many may have read or read about the NYTs Harvard chaplain story circulating late this past week. Jordan Gandhi has done us a great service by providing the background to the situation from Harvard Christian Alumni; I […]

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The Great Books

 

Remember those 71 volumes of the Harvard Classics that you felt bound to read but after many minor starts, you set aside a volume and got lost in that detective series? So many books; so little time.

Well, the dreaded Amazon has published on Kindle all 71 volumes in one mostly well-linked file for a mere $1.99. Worth the price. Only 37,451 pages. I always have five or six books I’m reading, switching from one to the other, depending on my mood.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are happy to be joined by Kerry McDonald, a Senior Fellow at the Foundation for Economic Education and author of Unschooled: Raising Curious, Well-Educated Children Outside the Conventional Classroom. Drawing on her experiences as a homeschooling parent and researcher, Kerry shares thoughts on the major lessons we all should be learning from this educational moment, now that COVID has turned most of America’s 50 million schoolchildren and their families into “homeschoolers.” Kerry reviews which education choice mechanisms, such as education savings accounts, would most effectively support homeschooling, and which states have policies that encourage entrepreneurship and innovative K-12 models, such as microschools and virtual charter schools. They also explore the increasing diversity of the two million children in the U.S. who were homeschooled before the pandemic, changing public perceptions, and a Harvard Law School professor’s controversial call for a presumptive ban.

Stories of the Week: Over 100 Catholic schools across the country are permanently closing as a result of the financial losses associated with COVID, impacting an estimated 50,000 mostly low-income and working-class students. How will the closures affect cash-strapped district schools facing an influx of these new students? Kudos to Kelley Brown, a history teacher from Easthampton, Massachusetts, who led her high school history students to win the national “We the People” civics competition. The achievement – a first for the Bay State – was all the more impressive considering the contest was held in the midst of a global pandemic and conducted entirely via Zoom, requiring extraordinary coordination.

Big votes are coming soon on impeachment and in Iowa. Join Jim and Greg as they dive into reports suggesting three Senate Democrats are torn between convicting and acquitting President Trump. But will any of them actually buck their party? They also shudder at reports that the head of the Harvard chemistry department took taxpayer-funded research grants, only to pass his discoveries along to the Chinese for a very handsome sum of money – and he’s not alone. And while Jim generally gives high marks to Florida Sen. Rick Scott, he is exasperated to see Scott launching ads in Iowa which most analysts see as a thinly veiled preview of a 2024 White House bid.

One good and two crazy martinis await today. Jim and Greg react to House Democrat Brenda Lawrence backing away from impeachment and now saying censuring President Trump would be more appropriate in an election year. They also try to figure out what Barack Obama’s 2020 approach is as he not only doesn’t endorse Joe Biden but in private is apparently slamming Biden’s inability to connect with voters. And they roll their eyes as Harvard and Yale students disrupt the annual football game between the two schools to protest both schools for investing in fossil fuels.

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https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/liberal-judge-lets-harvard-discriminate-against-asian-americans Burroughs, an Obama appointee, acknowledges that “Asian Americans would likely be admitted at a higher rate than white applicants if admissions decisions were made based solely on the academic and extracurricular ratings.” Instead, they are admitted at a lower rate than white and black applicants, and at a significantly lower rate than applicants of […]

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https://www.wsj.com/articles/harvards-legal-discrimination-11570143828?mod=MorningEditorialReport&mod=&mod=djemMER_h “Ensuring diversity at Harvard relies, in part, on race conscious admissions,” wrote federal Judge Allison Burroughs. “Race conscious admissions will always penalize to some extent the groups that are not being advantaged by the process, but this is justified by the compelling interest in diversity and all the benefits that flow from a diverse […]

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David French of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss Harvard’s decision to rescind the admittance of Kyle Kashuv, a Parkland shooting survivor and conservative, for controversial past statements. They analyze the general misinformation and public ignorance about Medicare-for-All. And for today’s crazy martini, they discuss O.J. Simpson joining the Twittersphere.

Harvard Caught in Victim Vise

 

Haaah-vahd is caught in a virtuous-victims vise, and it couldn’t happen to a more deserving center of intersectional grievance mongers. For the past year, Harvard has been slowly bled by allegations and then ugly revelations about their administration’s racial problem with Asians. Now, Harvard is being sued for profiting today from the racist Harvard past, specifically by exploiting the image of a slave. The plaintiff claims she is a descendant of the exploited African-American and suffers harm herself in seeing the continued exploitation of her ancestor by Harvard.

So, Harvard University is being sued for discrimination against Asians, in the same way as they once discriminated against Jews, and is being separately sued for the present-day continuation of its 19th-century exploitation of an African-American slave. Perhaps the Harvard shield of arms should be updated, replacing “Veritas,” written across three open books, with a plain black bar sinister.

It couldn’t happen to a nicer bunch:

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast number 180 (!!!) for June 20, 2018, it’s the Good Latte edition of the show with your hosts radio guy Todd Feinburg, AI-guy Mike Stopa and, much more important than that, guest the inimitable syndicated columnist, Harvard Professor (check this out!), and author of The Great Revolt, Inside the Populist Coalition Reshaping American Politics, (with co-author Brad Todd), Salena Zito.

We will talk with Salena about her book, the great heart she shows in her writings, her gig as a Harvard Professor and Trump-supporting thugs on the beach! (and much else).

The Ballad of Elizabeth Warren

 

To the tune of The Ballad of Jed Clampett (the theme song and closing verse from “The Beverly Hillbillies”):

Come and listen to a story ’bout a gal named Liz,
Poor lady lawyer was nothing like a whiz.
She knew that Harvard was the place she ought to be,
So she came up with the lie that she was part Cherokee!
(Indian blood … faculty diversity … we can check off a box—you’re hired!)

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Next on Thinking It Through:  I get the opportunity to converse with the Editor-in-Chief of Ricochet.com, Mr. Jon Gabriel.  He gives me his thoughts on Harvard hiring (and later rescinding the invitation) Chelsea Manning to be a visiting fellow, ESPN Host Jemele Hill’s recent comments on Trump, Trump working with Democrats, and how important is building the […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are happy to see Ben Shapiro was able to give his speech at Berkeley without incident in the auditorium and minimal unrest outside, which this year counts as very good news.  They also unload on Harvard for offering convicted spy Bradley Manning, who now identifies as Chelsea Manning, a position as a visiting fellow, and only rescinding the offer after the intelligence community denounces the move.  And they groan as a terrorist attack on the London tube injures 22 people and suggests terrorists there might be changing their tactics.

I Thought This Deserved a Post of Its Own

 

In the thread for our recent Harvard Lunch Club Podcast — the Rigged Podcast — we reverted again, with the inevitability of Groundhog Day, to the eternal Trump versus #NeverTrump argument. I thought it worthwhile to recapitulate the discussion. Apologies to those who have reached the stage of nausea in this issue. In the podcast my partner Todd Feinburg and I discuss the recent Victor Davis Hanson article advocating a vote for Trump for conservatives. We both think that it is a no-brainer and we both think that, even had we not been for Trump since long ago (say we had supported Rubio) we would have recognized that bruised egos aside there was really only one choice … which is essentially what VDH had to say (though he said it very well indeed).

In response, member rebark makes the following observation:

Harvard’s Final Clubs Debacle

 

shutterstock_143473063Last week, Harvard President Drew Gilpin Faust wrote a public letter on “Single-Gender Social Organizations,” which heralds a brave new social order at Harvard and perhaps elsewhere. The targets of her letter are Harvard’s so-called final clubs—those organizations that are the last, or final, clubs that undergraduates would join before leaving Harvard. These final clubs are not located on Harvard property and they receive no funding of any sort from the University, having been officially dissociated from Harvard in 1984. There are at present 13 of them—six accept only male members; five, only female members. Two formerly all-male clubs, Fox and Spee, are now co-ed after buckling under relentless pressure from Harvard. Some 30 percent of Harvard undergraduates are members of these organizations. It seems clear that there is substantial private demand for these clubs, and, for a period of many years, little or no demand for co-ed social clubs that served these same purposes.

These final clubs enjoy widespread acceptance among their members because some young people prefer to organize their social lives around single-sex organizations. To a classical liberal like myself, these revealed preferences count a great deal, for it would be foolish to insist that a large fraction of this nation’s future elites are so misguided about their own moral and social development that they would take steps to stunt their growth in both these dimensions. But in the eyes of progressives like Faust, these preferences should be dismissed as inconsistent with a bigger vision of a “campus free from exclusion on arbitrary grounds.” When an organization rejects “much of the student body merely because of its gender,” she writes, that “undermines the promise offered by Harvard’s diverse student body.” She then concludes on a paternalist note that these clubs “do not serve our students well when they step outside our gates into a society where gender-based discrimination is understood as unwise, unenlightened, and untenable.”

Faust offered no particulars for her indictment. Rather, she eagerly accepted the recommendations contained in a Harvard College letter, also from last week, by the college dean, Rakesh Khurara, which argues in harsh pernicious stereotypes that the final clubs are the “exclusive preserves of men” and create a power imbalance on campus, making it impossible for Harvard to move forward in the 21st century. He twists the knife in deep by insisting that any student who is a member of one of these clubs will be denied positions of leadership “in recognized student organizations or athletic teams,” and will not receive Dean endorsement letters that are needed when applying to prestigious scholarships such as the Rhodes and Marshall awards. Khurara only stops short of insisting that membership in a final club should be grounds for expulsion from Harvard.

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There are many ways to react to this video of Harvard students debating whether white people have human rights, but my first reaction is this: these assertion-flinging knuckleheads are Harvard students? The cream of the crop? They make Mizzou students look like philosopher kings. [UPDATE: no, they’re not Harvard Students. See below.] Preview Open

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Harvard Fellow Attends Anti-Police Brutality Conference … in Iran

 

Speaking of education, I caught Michael Totten’s latest column at World Affairs Journal about this group of twenty-odd American yo-yos who’ve gone to a conference in Iran against police brutality and racism. No, not Iranian policy brutality and racism. American police brutality and racism. Mike, reporting this with the journalistic equivalent of a straight face, notes that,

The Iranian government hunts down gay people and hangs them from cranes. It sends the Basij militia into the streets to attack peaceful protesters with clubs, chains, knives and axes. It routinely and as a matter of policy tortures liberal activists and intellectuals in Evin Prison.

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There has been chatter on the web about the Harvard faculty complaints about increased cost sharing in their 2015 health plan.  Jon Gabriel posted about it here.  Anyway, I thought it might be nice to compile the numbers I’ve seen tossed around into one place…just to get an overall picture of the changes.   Here […]

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Why Does Harvard Discriminate against Asians?

 

We’re conservatives around here, though we often disagree about what, exactly, that means. But one area where there’s common agreement — at least, it’s always seemed to me — is the whole idea of racial preferences and set-asides. We’re against them, most of us. Mostly, the liberals are for them. But sometimes they get all tied up in knots when there’s an ethnic group being held back by quotas. Asians, for instance, seem to be actively discriminated against when applying to Harvard. From an editorial in the New York Times:

To get into the top schools, [Asians] need SAT scores that are about 140 points higher than those of their white peers. In 2008, over half of all applicants to Harvard with exceptionally high SAT scores were Asian, yet they made up only 17 percent of the entering class (now 20 percent). Asians are the fastest-growing racial group in America, but their proportion of Harvard undergraduates has been flat for two decades.