Tag: Guns

Join Jim and Greg as they remember the late former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and discuss how he will be remembered if history is accurate. They also welcome news that Herschel Walker now enjoys a slight lead in the Georgia U.S. Senate race and dissect John Fetterman’s decision to drop out of a Senate debate in Pennsylvania. And they cringe at President Biden’s numerous gaffes and lies as he campaigned for Fetterman and others Tuesday in Pennsylvania.

Join Jim and Greg as they recoil at the horrific assassination of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and discuss why he was such a valuable U.S. ally. They also welcome better than expected job growth in June. And they wonder if New York Democrats learned anything from the Supreme Court decision as they pass new hurdles for residents to get concealed carry permits – including submitting their social media accounts for an evaluation of their character and conduct.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the Supreme Court marshal urging state officials in Virginia and Maryland to protect Supreme Court justices and stop protests outside their private homes. But they do wonder why it took her almost two months to do this. They also get a kick out of California Gov. Gavin Newsom trying to claim there is more freedom in California than in Florida in his laughable attempt to troll Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis. And they fume as yet another mass shooter littered the internet with his fascination with other mass killings.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the second amendment conversion of a New York liberal who now sees the value of a gun for self-defense and how restrictive laws don’t keep weapons away from bad guys. They also cheer the news that many environmental activists are packing up and leaving D.C. after Thursday’s Supreme Court decision on the EPA. And they sigh as President Biden tells Americans they will be stuck with high gas prices until Ukraine defeats Russia.

 

Guns, Abortion, and the Clashes Yet to Come

 

Last week, the Supreme Court delivered two blockbuster opinions. The first, New York State Rifle & Pistol Association, Inc. v. Bruen, struck down a New York state law provision that required any person who wished to carry a concealed handgun in public to first demonstrate to a public official that they had “proper cause” to do so for self-defense. In practice, this meant that applicants had to show that they faced a special risk above and beyond the ordinary risks that everyone runs in society. The second, Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, put an end to the forty-nine-year period in which Roe v. Wade (1973) guaranteed a constitutional right to abortion.

The response to both these decisions was strong and emphatic—from both sides. However, because the six conservative justices stuck together for both decisions, the left howled far louder than the right. Sadly, advocates on both sides treated their positions as self-evident truths, ignoring difficult conceptual and administrative challenges. Thus, in Dobbs, there was no middle ground. Forces on the right took great pleasure in concluding that Dobbs is a “triumph of democracy, constitutionalism, and courage,” and that the court rightly rejected living constitutionalism and returned the question of abortion rights to the people. The liberal dissenters asked not whether the people had the right to regulate abortion but rather whether each woman had the right to decide for herself whether to have a baby. By throwing the issue back into the hands of legislatures, the Supreme Court gave only modest comfort to many states, such as Illinois, that decided to protect Roe, while others—like Indiana, Wisconsin, Missouri, and Iowa—sought to reinstate restrictions that could turn the clock back beyond the bad old days before Roe.

Bruen reversed those roles: progressives thought legislative discretion should control, while conservatives took the view that the Second Amendment gives the right to bear firearms strong constitutional protection.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the Supreme Court decision confirming that gun owners do not need to “show cause” to get a concealed carry permit. They also criticize four Senate Democrats for demanding Google not include any information on pregnancy resource centers when people search for abortion services. And they wonder why the Biden administration is banning Juul vaping products.

Rob Long is in for Jim. Join Rob & Greg as they cheer a Republican victory in a very unlikely place. They are also excited to see the skyrocketing number of African-Americans purchasing firearms. They then go on to criticize the Biden administration for punishing border patrol agents for a “whipping” allegation that never actually happened.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome an even brighter forecast for Republicans in the 2022 midterms. They also strongly reject President Biden’s suggestion that 9mm handguns ought to be banned. And they react to Biden reportedly being frustrated that his staff keeps telling reporters that he meant something other than what he said.

 

Former federal prosecutor Andrew C. McCarthy is in for Jim agai today. Andy and Greg break down the four-part Washington Examiner investigation into the Hunter Biden laptop and everything that’s been uncovered thus far. They also discuss the push for red flag laws and the tension between trying to keep truly unstable people away from weapons that they might use to kill others and the desire to protect second amendment rights. And they fume over how Democrats make a lot of noise about the need to address various problems but won’t allow any ideas to be considered outside of their absolutist left-wing agenda.

Former federal prosecutor Andrew C. McCarthy is in for Jim today. Andy and Greg try to figure out why police would wait 40 minutes before entering the Texas elementary school when they there was carnage unfolding inside. They also slam Beto O’Rourke for trying to score political points by interrupting the governor’s press conference in Uvalde on Wednesday. And McCarthy brings us up to speed on the Durham investigation into the origins of the Russian collusion narrative, and he explains why Michael Sussmann may be acquitted even though it’s patently obvious that he lied to the FBI.

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This is your reminder that May is National Mental Health Awareness Month. We do not need or want more reminders.  The latest reminder is another horrific and senseless snuffing out of young and innocent lives by a deranged person, this time at an elementary school in deep southwest Texas. It was followed by the predictable […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they discuss Tuesday’s horrific mass shooting at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, that left at least 19 students and two teachers dead. First, they examine the calls for legislation to restrict access to guns or certain types of guns and what impact those steps would have had in this case. They also get into why young people come to the point of contemplating or carrying out such heinous attacks and what ideas closer to home might make a big difference. And Jim previews this week’s NRA annual meeting and how the the horrific events of the past couple of weeks might be addressed.

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I’m not a gun guy. I like guns, I appreciate guns, and I’m familiar with guns, but I don’t enjoy guns. Some guys like nothing better than a day on the range popping off a few boxes of ammo. For me, using a gun is like driving a vehicle or working a chainsaw. I use these dangerous […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome even more data showing that criminals steer clear from people they suspect may have guns. They also discuss whether the increasing chatter about Russia being willing to use tactical nukes against Ukraine is based in reality. And they wonder why one of the shooters arrested as part of the probe into Saturday’s mass shooting in South Carolina was allowed to go home and might be permitted to go back to work with an ankle monitor.

Join Jim and Greg as they cover President Biden’s latest all-time low approval rating. Despite delivering a Supreme Court Justice and the waning of the COVID-19 virus, Biden’s approval percentage sank to just 42% in the latest CBS New/YouGov Poll.  They also analyze the host of factors contributing to increasing despair and hopelessness in the American teenager including social media, COVID-19, and the media. And in a desperate attempt to appease his increasingly dissatisfied base, President Biden is taking steps to counter “ghost guns” this week.

Join Jim and Greg as they assess departing Tennessee Democrat Jim Cooper’s warning to his party about its alienation of rural voters. They are amazed that President Biden’s latest deportation and inflation numbers are somehow even worse than expected. And they laugh at Texas gubernatorial candidate Beto O’Rourke’s inability to decide if he wants to take away your guns or not.

Jim and Greg welcome hall of fame broadcaster Bob Costas as their first-ever guest on the podcast. Costas joins us to clarify his positions on issues we have scrutinized in the past and explain why he believes he has been unfairly painted as a progressive over his comments on guns and his call years ago for the Washington Redskins to drop their mascot – which they did in 2020.

They also discuss comments Costas made in calling out the International Olympic Committee for cozying up to China for the upcoming Winter Olympics and the problem of groupthink in the sports world, where only one position is often considered acceptable.

I’ll be teaching an online course: The History of the Second Amendment

 

Hullo, everyone. I’m just popping in to let you all know about an online course I’m teaching early next year called The History of the Second Amendment. It’s with a new startup called Chapter, which noticed that pretty much every course they were offering was either progressive or progressive-adjacent, decided that it didn’t want to become an echo chamber, and so asked me to teach one, too. I suggested the history of the right to keep and bear arms as a topic, they agreed, and here were are.

Chapter describes its system as “like a book club, but way more fun.” Each week, I’ll provide a reading list (which could be articles, reviews, videos, podcasts, or primary source documents), along with insights and tips on each one. There will be a community forum in which you can discuss each topic, as well as a rolling Q&A in which I will answer questions — both on their website and, if the topic warrants it, by video. Because people are busy, everything will be “asynchronous” — that is, you can take part whenever you’re free, rather than at times that are set by me. The course will last four weeks, it will cost $40 (actually: $35 for Ricochet members), and it will run the gamut.

Week One will be on pre-Revolutionary America. We’ll explore how the right to keep and bear arms came over with the colonists from Britain, before making its way into the heart of American law.

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Click here to listen to the podcast! On this episode of the Resistance Library Podcast, Sam and Dave discuss federal gun control in America. Mass shootings at schools are among the most traumatic events in modern-day America. These tragic incidents receive wall-to-wall media coverage and spark heated political debate. Preview Open

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Guns in the Wine Cellar

 

I’m a gun guy. I’ve carried a gun most of my adult life. All of my children grew up shooting; one of them is a pretty good competitive shooter. A few of them hunt — I never did, just not an outdoorsy sort. I taught self-defense shooting classes a long time ago when I lived in Tucson, back in the early days of the women-with-guns thing; most of my students were women who had never handled a gun. I enjoyed it.

I’m a fairly self-controlled fellow. To the extent that I fly off the handle… well, you’ve seen about the worst of it here. I’m pretty mild-mannered, don’t have a temper to speak of, drink modestly and am never drunk, and usually — not always — think before I speak. I’m a pretty responsible guy, the kind of person who handles guns safely and competently.