Tag: Group Writing

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So smile for a while and let’s be jollyLove shouldn’t be so melancholyCome along and share the good times while we can — Lynn Anderson, “Rose Garden” More

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As April showers vaporize in the desert heat, and the ice breaks on the Santa Cruz River (that is, the temperature finally hits 100° F), chill out with a few rainy day songs. Gordon Lightfoot celebrates “Rainy Day People:” More

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The monthly theme is going through a bit of a dry spell this month. Whether you have a flower or blossom sighting from a walk, or a bit of beauty in or around your abode, do snap and share! Please stop by the April group writing sign up sheet, with the broad theme “April Flowers.” Yes, […]

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As we enter the Easter season, after the long Lenten season, and as spring brings some promise of brighter days ahead, how about another play list? We earlier celebrated spring flowers, in song. Here are a few tunes about April, or rain, or spring. April showers may bring flowers, depending on your latitude and attitude. […]

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We are currently caught up in a pandemic. It’s breath and depth is yet to be determined – but we already know that things will never quite be the same. Many years from now, we will reminisce about 2020 and the Year of Covid-19. No one who didn’t experience it will quite understand. Not that […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Spring Flowers in Song

 

Here are a few blooming ideas to start a soundtrack for the season. I invite you to share your own in the comments or even start your own flower patch with a particular musical genre. We’ll start off in the 19th century with Stephen Foster, “Ah! May the Red Rose Live Always!” Suzy Bogguss, a wonderful traditional country singer, offers this rendition:

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The first one usually arrives in my mailbox on the day after Christmas. It’s a clever marketing ploy. Still hungover from too much turkey and sitting in December’s gray days, the prospect of a clear spring day in the garden warms the heart. I don’t recall ever signing up for seed catalogs – but now […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Unexpected Disaster and Unexpected Triumph: Spring Storms and Flowering Futures

 

An important day in history will coincide with one of our darker days this month,* and President Trump should be ready to link the lessons of the past with our current condition. On April 11, 1970, Americans saw the increasingly mundane sight of yet another Apollo mission rocketing towards the Moon. There were no grand new tricks promised to amaze the global audience. Just two missions after “one giant leap for mankind,” Americans had a false sense of security about an extremely dangerous enterprise in the most unforgiving conditions. Then, on the third day of the Apollo 13 mission, we were given a giant bucket of ice water in the face: “Houston, we’ve had a problem.” That was 50 years ago this month, and what an auspicious time to celebrate America!

President Trump’s team must seize the opportunity now, preparing a video presentation and live link-up of the surviving key players, to remind the nation, at our likely Chinese coronavirus nadir, that there was another very dark week in which all seemed lost but Americans refused to lose. Get on Jim Lovell, who said “Houston, we’ve had a problem,” and Gene Kranz, the NASA chief flight director on duty when the threat unfolded, whose autobiography is Failure Is Not An Option. Celebrate our ingenuity, our resolve, our resilience, and link it all with our current troubles and responses.

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Springwood Park in my hometown. It was not our largest park, nor was it conveniently located. Honestly, it wasn’t easy to get to for anyone except maybe those who lived on the same road; a road I recall flooding often. All that made the place a little exotic. It wasn’t the usual territory, not the […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Work of Millennia

 

When some prehistoric man, wounded and hungry (as he always was), stepped out onto the plain, he could find around him what he needed to survive. He could find plants and animals to eat, and those plants and animals would provide him with just enough energy to find more plants and animals, and when a little energy was left over, he could find some material to shelter him from the elements.

But of course, the animals didn’t lay down and offer themselves to him. The rocks cleaved to the earth; the plants tried to hold fast in the ground. The sad fact is that work was required. Work, stone-cold work, made the difference between life and death. But at least he could do it. And with each hard meal, and with each driving rain or bitter cold snap that he passed warm and dry, prehistoric man gained another day. But only having another day was not enough to satisfy him, not enough to convince him to rest.

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There are two major monthly Group Writing projects. One is the Quote of the Day project, managed by @vectorman. This is the other project, in which Ricochet members claim one day of the coming month to write on a proposed theme. This is an easy way to expose your writing to a general audience, with […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Working Oneself to Death

 

This little missive provoked a lot of likes in the running commentary we call the PIT at Ricochet.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Working Up a Playlist for Social Distancing and Self-Quarantine

 

Just to be helpful, and because there was white space in the monthly theme calendar, I give you my first cut at the Social Distancing and Self Quarantine Playlist.

Let’s start off nice and easy, with a tune from those quintessential boys of summer:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. More Fevered Calculations: Working the Coronavirus Numbers

 

In all the hype and happy talk around the latest coronavirus to cross over to humans, keep an eye on this number in America: 498,000. That is the number of people this novel coronavirus will have to infect to cause as many deaths as the annual, seasonal flu. I tried to make sense of the numbers around notorious coronavirus, a.k.a. COVID-19, in a post about a week ago now.

I now note that the presidential proclamation, suspending travel from certain countries, referred to COVID-19 as “SARS-CoV-2.” The CDC page explains the reason for the changing names. This prompted another look at the numbers, with this math-challenged scribbler doing a bit of stubby pencil, back-of-the-envelope figuring. Check my math as I work through the numbers; hopefully it is better than Ma and Pa Kettle’s.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. You’ll Have Time to Rest When You’re Dead

 

Thomas Carlyle, the conservative Victorian proselytizer for the idea that hard work is man’s highest virtue, would strongly disapprove of my current idle and unproductive life.

I wasn’t always this way. I used to be as busy as Joe Biden’s hands in a roomful of women. As a kid, I shined shoes in bars, delivered both of LA’s newspapers on a bike, and set pins in a bowling alley. As an adult, I installed telephones for Ma Bell, spiked my way up telephone poles for the Army, studied hard enough to get a Ph.D., and taught English full-time in two universities for thirty years.

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In game design, “grinding” is a term for performing a repetitive action in pursuit of a long-term reward. Some people use the term without reference to fun. But “grind” is more commonly employed by players to identify a redundancy that becomes boring or burdensome, though it is tolerated because the goal is sufficiently enticing. Some […]

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All right folks, let’s get workin’. There are many open days left on this month’s theme “Working.” You really don’t want me to break out the Charmin Bears, outhouses, and disco music! All you need do is write a short post to start the conversation. Perhaps you could ask a question or two to get […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Two Simple 2020 Initiatives to Change the Political Landscape

 

They are simple but not easy. Then again, things worth doing are seldom easy, especially when entrenched interests are threatened. Nevertheless, sometimes there are simple solutions that can actually shift the political landscape. So, consider changing the dynamics of elections at the state and local level, while recasting the college scene without a dime of additional spending.

1. Change your state’s election rules to truly empower voters, increasing participation and ballot box integrity.

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“Nice Work if You Can Get It” is a George and Ira Gershwin song composed as part of the sound track for the 1937 song and dance movie A Damsel in Distress. It was first sung by Fred Astaire with backing vocals by The Stafford Sisters, led by Jo Stanford, who had a long career […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Working Tunes

 

Let’s start off March with some of the soundtrack of our lives, songs about work and working. Here are a few tunes that come to mind for me. Are some of these songs that come to mind for you as well, and do you have other tunes in your mental soundtrack?

Tennessee Ernie Ford’s “Sixteen Tons” is the first song that comes to my mind. It is a working man’s lament at a rigged system, while also boasting of great physical prowess, a man among men.

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