Tag: Group Writing

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An Unexpected and Very Wanted Baby: Group Writing, Unexpected Gifts

 

I know some of you have heard all this before. Well too bad. Here it is again. More

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Shaker-ing the Ricochet Tree for Unexpected Gifts

 

We have plenty of days open for your stories, recollections, or musings on gifts of all sorts. Please do tell. Click through to “March 2019 Group Writing Theme: Unexpected Gifts” and sign up for a day or so. ‘Tis the gift to be simple, and to the point. This forum exists to encourage members to […]

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Unexpected Gifts: Turning Eleven Away from Home

 

The bike I rode at our Chiang Mai, Thailand, boarding school was inherited from my older brother. He had received it it already well-used, and he and his buddy Steve had not exactly gone easy on it back when we lived in the village. So it was not much to look at: faded red, maybe pretty once, with worn front basket and backseat long gone. The wheel rims were rusted, I remember, because I used to stare at them and think about rust–what made it happen, how blighted it made the wheels look, and how odd that my brother could rub it off with some compound on a rag. It was like a toothless, blotchy, gaunt, yet sinewy older woman.

Nevertheless, I enjoyed that bike from the time I arrived at the dorm as an eight-year-old. It was serviceable for cruising around the network of side streets (soi is the Thai word for something like an alleyway) and perfectly good for trips to the corner store, where we bought cheap sweets for one baht. It was best, though, for joining the boys in the street in front of the dormitory. We rode back and forth and in circles, refining our stunts. Although it was no BMX, this bike of mine could be coaxed do wheelies. Next, I mastered the skill of riding around with my hands at my sides. I loved the joke, probably from our dorm’s old copies of Boys’ Life, where each time a kid pedals past his mom, he announces a new trick: “Look, Mom, no hands.” He progresses through his repertoire until he says, “Look, Mom, no teeth!” None of us thought of wearing helmets, but nobody seemed to get hurt.

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Unexpected Gifts of Grub while Grubby

 

This is a tale of unexpected gifts of grub, indeed tasty treats, while in the field on military duty. Each is an unexpected relief from planned, forecast, resourced Army chow. None of these, well almost none, were going to win any awards, but they were gifts of sweet relief from the grind of standard Army […]

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An Unexpected Gift: A Legacy Handed Down

 

It was in the early 1950s when Sonny and Julia met. Sonny was a lineman for the local electric utility. On their first date, Sonny wore a shirt with French cuffs, and Julia took note of it; she liked a sharp-dressed man. On some gift-giving occasion along the way in their courtship, Julia bought a matching tie bar and cuff links for Sonny. They were gold, each with a couple pieces of thick-gauge gold wire worked into a loose square knot. Simple. Elegant. Classy. After they were married, Julia found out that Sonny had only ever had the one shirt with French cuffs, and as an electrical lineman, was not much of one for dressing up, nor did he have much call for it. Still, he had that jewelry and kept it safe throughout his life.

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An Unexpected Gift: A Culture of Appropriation

 

Years ago I was told about a family letter. In it, a relative had asked another who was into genealogy about the family history. The letter began:

When a man steals a loaf of bread, one calls him a thief. When a man steals a kingdom, one calls him “The Conqueror.”

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March 2019 Group Writing Theme: Unexpected Gifts

 

There are two major monthly Group Writing projects. One is the Quote of the Day project, managed by @vectorman. This is the other project, in which Ricochet members claim one day of the coming month to write on a proposed theme. This is an easy way to expose your writing to a general audience, with […]

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How Do You Make That Hose?

 

http://hbd-ther.knowledge4you.ca/wp-content/uploads/industrial-hose_product-image.pngYou likely use things made with the help of my maternal grandfather’s patent every day. From cars to jet airliners, from garden hoses to welding torches, reinforced hose is used. You need an inner layer that stands up to whatever flows through the hose, you need a reinforcing layer to keep the hose from bulging and bursting under pressure, and you need an outer coating to protect the hose from the external environment. So, how do you make that? Therein lies a tale.

F. Merrill Galloway was my maternal grandfather. Born in 1908, he went home at 95. He worked his entire adult life until the Transient Ischemic Attacks (TIA) or mini-strokes ended his ability to work in his late 80s. He worked with both his hands and his mind, from his garden, to clocks, to rebuilding a violin from broken pieces in a cigar box. Then there was the work that paid the bills and in which he took enormous pride.

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How to Build a Computer 27: Data Recovery

 

We’ve covered the physical aspects of a hard disk drive, tonight we’ll touch on the way data is organized on the drive, by covering those two most important topics; keeping secrets and ferreting other people’s out.

In this case describing the times this joke has been used since it was last funny.

We’ll start by deleting files: Let’s say that I’ve got a backlog of old and worn-out memes to purge. That’s no problem, you just move them from the exquisitely detailed and organized archive of these things into the trash can, but that doesn’t actually erase anything. Bill Gates, knowing that we mere mortals are flawed and prone to regret, keeps your trashed files around in case your stale jokes may, someday in the future, be called for again. But we’re stronger than that. So we empty the trash folder (or, pro-tip; on a Windows box if you hold down ‘Shift’ as you delete a file the file doesn’t go to the trash at all; it empties automatically.)

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How to Make Lemon Meringue Pie

 

When I thought to write this post as a tutorial in making a lemon meringue pie, I first thought I’d make one, and photograph each step along the way. But…I only make this home baked extravaganza about three times a year for a reason. For instance, it generates a vast pile of dirty dishes: More

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Making Spiced Tomato Jam: Not-too-sweet spread

 

On Valentine’s Day, enjoy some sweetly spiced red tomato jam. Really, tomatoes are a fruit. In a jam, they offer a good balance of sweetness and acidity that is less cloyingly sweet than other red fruit jams. I use a spiced tomato jam/butter recipe from Allrecipes.com. There is, of course, a tale in how I […]

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How Does He Make That? Watching a Cigar Roller

 

Nicaragua, the Undiscovered Luxury Beach Destination for Billionaires and CelebritiesThis past December, a conversation with a local cigar lounge owner turned to his plans for 2019. He was planning to become the first cigar establishment in Arizona to be approved as a cigar manufacturer, to be legally selling cigars rolled on the premise.

A week ago, I stopped by and watched the roller at work. So, how do you roll a cigar? It turns out that the more important question is “how do you make a cigar?”

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Instigating a food fight: how do you make barbecue?

 

Desperate times call for desperate measures, even measures of ingredients for barbecue. I know perfectly well that there is a difference between East and West North Carolina barbecue. Kansas City and Texas have more than multiple sports feuds between them. Bring it. Or tell us how you make a side dish, or dessert. Or tell […]

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Poetry Forms, No.13: Sestina

 

General Description and Requirements

The sestina is one of the more difficult forms to master. There are at least two reasons for this. The first is the length of the poem. One might write a few sonnets per day. The sonnet only has 140 syllables when using the English Heroic Line of iambic pentameter. A sestina using the same line is 390 syllables long, almost three times the size. More difficult than the length, though, is the requirement for the use of end words. In a sonnet, such as the English sonnet, one should have fourteen different words that rhyme in pairs, so seven pairs of rhymed words. In the sestina’s thirty-nine lines, there are exactly six words. That is not saying six sets of rhymed words. There are only six words that end the thirty-nine lines.

Whereas rhymed poetry tends to have a rhyming pattern, such as the English sonnet’s ababcdcdefefgg pattern; the sestina instead uses a folding pattern. All stanzas are six lines, and the order of the end words in the first stanza determines the order in subsequent stanzas as such:
Stanza 1: 123456
Stanza 2: 615243
Stanza 3: 364125
Stanza 4: 532614
Stanza 5: 451362
Stanza 6: 246531.

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How to Make Booze Better

 

Some booze is best served in a saucer, in the garden, as slug bait. Other alcoholic beverages are best served at particular temperatures, in particular glassware, revealing their full palette of flavors. Then there is booze that could be better, and therein lies today’s tale.

Whilst serving deep in the heart of Texas, I happened upon Ranger Creek, a “brewstillery.” This neologism denotes a craft brewery that also has a license to distill alcohol. The brewery piece is a source of steady income, with quick conversion of ingredients into beer ready to be poured. The distillery side can be as efficient, or even more so, if you stick to un-aged clear spirits: vodka, gin, white whiskey, white rum, blanco tequila. 

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How to Make a GPS System

 

The GPS has three segments:

1. Space segment: The original requirement was for 24 satellites in circular orbits in three symmetrical planes (120 degrees apart) at 12-hour orbits. Today, the Air Force uses 31 satellites in six symmetrical planes at 55 degrees of inclination (the satellites go as far as 55 degrees north and south). The satellites contain synchronized atomic clocks (mainly rubidiums).

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Childhood Toys: Preservation, Renovation, or Restomod?

 

https://proxy.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fnews.images.itv.com%2Fimage%2Ffile%2F216788%2Fimage_update_4e5fd654260a38d1_1370859838_9j-4aaqsk.jpeg&f=1We have explored renovation in many forms last month. How is it that classic cars can go up in value when restored or even restomodded? Why is the practice of fixing rust on old cars of marginal interest, while any collector of weapons, or toys, or furniture, to name a few, shudders at the idea of refinishing or in any way renovating the original item? Let’s explore the three options of preservation, restoration, and restomodding a childhood toy: a tin model World War I tank.

To set up the scenario, I’ll use my father’s telling of the story of his “Rosebud.” That is, loosely, a childhood toy with emotional significance through adulthood. After the telling, we will look at an available example of the toy and consider the value of preservation, restoration, or restomodding.

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Have a heart, tell us how you make that!

 

We have plenty of days available this month for tips and tales of making. How do you make that? How do you make that? Subjects might vary from beer, to brains, to brats (sausage)? Long term contributors are welcome, and first time efforts are especially encouraged. For February, our theme is “How Do You Make That?”All you need do is […]

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Beer-Making the Easy Way

 

We started February off with what may fairly be called Arahant’s General Theory of Creativity:

Mostly it was knowing a few techniques, having the right tools, and having a love for building and creating whatever it was.

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