Tag: Group Writing

Member Post

 

This game is usually called Two Truths and a Lie, but considering this month’s theme I changed it to Two Truths and a Fiction! For those who have never played, you come up with three “facts” about yourself, but one of them isn’t actually true. Then everyone else who is playing guesses which one is […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

The Truth About Fact-Checking Truth and Fiction

 

sorting fact fictionNoodling around the internet, searching on “truth or fiction,” I pulled out truthorfiction.com and mediabiasfactcheck.com. Opening up mediabiasfactcheck.com and reading their “about” page prompted this post. Take as true that a very small organization is dedicated to accurately sorting media sources on the independent left—right and “conspiracy-pseudoscience”—”pro-science” axes. The viewpoint of the team or the team members comprising the organization may not blind, but will at least distort their judgment. If not a blind spot, they will certainly have a cognitive astigmatism. “Fact-checking” political and other value-laden stories was dominated, almost from the beginning, by leftists, who understood the value of controlling information and public perception.

Consider this paragraph from mediabiasfactcheck.com:

The credibility of a website/media source is not determined by who owns them but rather by their track record. Everybody starts as a beginner and, through experience, becomes an authority in their field. MBFC [Media Bias Fact Check] is no different. Over the last 5+ years, we have proven to be a trusted authority on the rating of bias and the credibility of media sources. For example, MBFC is trusted by major media outlets and IFCN fact-checkers. This is evidenced by frequently being referenced by sources such as USA TodayReuters Fact CheckScience FeedbackWashington Post, and NPR, among dozens of others. We are also frequently used as a resource in libraries, high schools, and universities across the United States.

Member Post

 

There are two major monthly Group Writing projects. One is the Quote of the Day project, managed by @she. This is the other project, in which Ricochet members claim one day of the coming month to write on a proposed theme. Group Writing themes help generate conversations that are not necessarily about politics or current events. For July, our theme is “We Hold These Truths […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

For Independence Day, on the Fourth of July, I offer a list of posts this weekend on topic. Some posts may be about celebrations and observances. Some may be about history. There will surely be food and drink posts, music posts, and hopefully fireworks! How about a favorite recital of the Declaration of Independence? What […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

There are two major monthly Group Writing projects. One is the Quote of the Day project, managed by @she. This is the other project, in which Ricochet members claim one day of the coming month to write on a proposed theme. This is an easy way to expose your writing to a general audience, with a bit of accountability […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

There has been a great deal of good writing over the years, inspired by monthly theme cues. Maybe you missed some, or joined more recently. Instead of searching on tags, just bookmark this post. This index will capture all of them in one post, updated monthly. A big thank-you to past keepers of the themes; […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Group Writing: The Road to Perdition

 

The Road to Perdition was a short one for my family. April 17, 1975, the day after the country finished celebrating a very tense Khmer New Year, Phnom Penh residents were greeted with the sight of black-clad soldiers pouring into the city. My mother remembered having watched, along with her brother, from the balcony as soldiers who were not much older than her then ten-year-old self were welcomed by some city dwellers. 

“They said it’s just three days” recalled my grandmother of the day’s event. “They said we have to leave as the Americans are going to bomb the city.” 

Member Post

 

This July we will play off the beginning of the Declaration of Independence. Ricochet members, founding or first time subscribers, AND especially the reticent or keyboard shy, are heartily encouraged to join in our group writing project this month. Each month, Ricochet members like you share a few thoughts, a bit of knowledge or creativity, […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Day 3 (Wednesday June 16) didn’t have much in the way of roadside history, but represents the first use this year of the Helinox Chair Zero that I got two years ago.  Yes, I carry my own chair with me on long bicycle rides.  How degenerate is that?! Sometimes it’s nice to take a break […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

All aboard! We have plenty of seats open on this month’s schedule for group theme writing. Share your own journey with Ricochet readers. Stop by and sign up now for June’s theme: “Journeys.” There are two major monthly Group Writing projects. One is the Quote of the Day project, now managed by @she. This is the other […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Adoption & the Journey to Healing

 

It was on Tuesday, June 13, 1967 — 54 years ago yesterday — that a nineteen-year-old girl gave me the precious gift of life.

Then, from a place of love and fierce protection, my birth mother gave me the precious gift of unselfish love and made the tough choice of allowing someone else to raise me as their own, in the hopes that I’d have a better life than she believed she could provide.

Journey to Jerusalem

 

I was fifteen the summer my folks took me to the airport and waved farewell, as their number one son set off on a journey halfway around the world. I had no traveling companions, there were no cell phones, but I had traveler’s checks, a suitcase packed to the packing list, and a clear set of written coordinating instructions from Tel Aviv to the hotel in the Arab sector of Jerusalem. I was the first of three siblings to take roughly the same journey on the same archaeological expedition over a bit more than a decade. Remarkably, my folks had no serious reservations about turning me loose on the world, in an era of hijackings and occasional Cold War flavor terrorism.

Why?

Where Have You Gone, Samuil? A Journey Through Identity and Exile with Vladislav Khodasevich (Borscht Report #9/Group Writing)

 

When it comes to pre-WWII Russian literary critics and poets, Vladislav Khodasevich is not well known, particularly in the West. Compared to someone like, say, Bunin or Tsvetaeva, he’s been largely ignored. But Khodasevich deserves attention, both as a skilled memoirist and poet, and as one of the few who chronicled the whole journey of his generation through the realities of WWI and the White exile, grappling with issues of right, honor, and Russian identity, especially for those who carried non-Russian blood in the vast multiethnic empire. 

Born in Moscow in May of 1886, Khodasevich was the son of a Polish nobleman and a Jewish woman. Unlike the union of Vera and Vladimir Nabokov, though, theirs was not an unusual act of mutual tolerance. Jacob Brafman, Khodasevich’s maternal grandfather, was a famous convert from Judaism to Orthodoxy, who wrote The Book of Kahal, a forerunner to The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. He entered the law faculty of Moscow University in 1904, then switched to history and philology the next year, staying on until 1910. It was during his time at the university that Vladislav met Samuil Kissin, a law student and aspiring poet from Orsha who was a year older than he. Twenty years later, he said Kissin, whom he affectionately nicknamed Muni, was “как бы вторым «я»” (like my second self) and reflected on how “we lived in such a faithful brotherhood, in such close love, which now seems wonderful to me.”

Despite his training, Khodasevich did not want to be a historian or a philologist, but, like Kissin, a poet, and dropped out in the final year of his course. He frequented Moscow’s literary salons and cafes, and published articles and poems for famous literary magazines, like Golden Fleece and Libra. Although he was the descendant of a noble family, his father had come to Russia impoverished, and Kissin, who hailed from an observant Jewish merchant family (he was trained in Hebrew and the Talmud at home during his childhood) actually had a much more secure financial position, though he was always willing and happy to support his friend along with himself. 

Member Post

 

It happened on Sunday, September 20th, 1992, around 3:00 p.m., while driving with my fiancé through Nebraska—during that long straightaway on the I-80 freeway that begged for cruise control. We were several weeks into a bliss that I had never experienced up to that point in my life. I had conversationally revealed something about myself […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Journey Over the Keys

 

Sometimes the journey is downhill: a gentle slope to aid our run.
Sometimes the journey is uphill beneath a burnished, scorching sun.

And if we move our feet each day (although we do not go so far),
The steps add up o’er months and years and memories of tears and fun.

My Meandering Mind Stops by Ancient Egypt

 

Earlier this month, when I finished the novel The Eloquent Scribe, by T. Lee Harris, my meandering mind was full of all things Egypt.  First of all, the real protagonist in the book is not the young scribe, Sitehuti (who is an engaging youngster), but the Sacred Temple Cat who “adopts” him.  Nefer-Djenou-Bastet helps Sitehuti out of a potentially rough spot, and then becomes his constant companion through the rest of the book.  Being a Cat Lady, I thought about an actual cat breed, called the Egyptian Mau, that I had heard of but never bothered with.  In the book, the author describes “Neffi” (the nickname for the cat, that Sitehuti uses from the very beginning) as being regal, and spotted.  So the first thing I did was search for a picture of an Egyptian Mau cat, and found several.  They are actually spotted, and very beautiful (and very expensive-kittens can cost $2,500).  They come in at least three colors, silver, bronze, and black.  I expect that Neffi looked somewhat like this.

Member Post

 

To set the tone for June’s group writing theme, “Journeys,” here is a short playlist of songs about journeys. I look forward to Ricochet members’ additions to the list in the comments below. Whatever your journey or travel plans, do stop by and sign up now for June’s theme: “Journeys.” Let’s start off upbeat, with […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

May Day: Indianapolis 500

 

The 105th running of the Indianapolis 500 was glorious. It was the fastest qualifying field ever and the fastest ever race on the track. And, a wonderfully positive, emotional driving star won his fourth Indy 500 checkered flag in a race that was a battle to the very last lap. The race was largely unmarred by accidents and was run entirely under bright blue skies. The very best part: the 105th running of the Indianapolis 500 was before a full stadium of unmuzzled fans.

This great American tradition, signaling the start of summer, was a loud rejection of the entire leftist agenda, with the sweet smell of racing fuel and hot tires savored by Americans shoulder to shoulder in the sunshine without any sign of leftist plandemic fear and virtue signaling face coverings in the sea of normal humanity. The cherry on top was the winner; Helio Castroneves won at age 46.

True, there was a scattering of masks, frequently pulled down, in the press and event officiating crew. Yet, there was no solidarity in that stance. The masks have dropped. The official story was that track management limited fans to 40 percent, in submission to so-called public health officials or “experts.” On camera, it looked like the stands were full.