Tag: Group Writing

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Any time you can get dogs and ponies, of any size, into the same act, you have a winner. Wallace Tripp got that combination down in splendidly ridiculous form in his 1974 illustrated book of verse A Great Big Ugly Man Came Up and Tied His Horse to Me. The moment after this month’s theme came […]

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Haiku, unrhymed poetic form consisting of 17 syllables arranged in three lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables respectively. The haiku first emerged in Japanese literature during the 17th century, as a terse reaction to elaborate poetic traditions, though it did not become known by the name haiku until the 19th century. –Encyclopedia Brittanica……………………………………An example:Toward […]

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There are two major monthly Group Writing projects. One is the Quote of the Day project, managed by @arahant. This is the other project, in which Ricochet members claim one day of the coming month to write on a proposed theme. This is an easy way to expose your writing to a general audience, with […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Music That Makes Me Laugh

 

Growing up without a television in the house, we got our entertainment from LPs (long playing records), and from books. Along with mostly classical, children’s, and some fold or pop with good harmony, we got my parents’ taste in comedy.

My parents met in Philadelphia as the 1950s became the 1960s. Perhaps the hottest comedy act of that time was Nicols and May, Mike Nicols and Elaine May. These two took improv comedy to a whole new level, starting with Improvisations to Music. Stan Freberg was already an established talent, and generated a send up of Lawrence Welk in 1957.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Music That Makes Me Answer the Phone

 

Once cell phones began to move beyond merely being able to place calls and became able to store more and more data, we began to see the rise of ringtones. Beyond the novelty ringers, now everyone could have a ringtone for different callers.

My first phone allowed custom rings, but you had to program in each note. This was difficult for someone who is close to tone-deaf. I eventually got a better flip phone that had a decent system for downloading low-quality ringtones, but the selection was very limited. Once I got my first smartphone (a Palm Pre +) I could really innovate. All of my most common callers would get their own ringtone. It took some work because, by default, my phone was unable to play them at sufficient volume. I had to boost the volume with audio editing software, which hurt the dynamic range and sound quality, but they were loud enough to get my attention. Some uploading later, I had an ample array of ringtones.

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wThe big boys are still hiding in their clubhouses and squabbling over shares of what look to be shrinking revenue pies. Sports that have the nerve and moxie to get back in the arena are suddenly commanding viewer shares they only dreamed of over the past few years. Professional bowling is back rolling in prime […]

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June 14 is always Flag Day in the United States of America. It is also the Army birthday. Accordingly, here are a few songs focused on the Stars and Stripes. We conclude with the Army Song. Add your own for the national flag or the Army in the comments. Naturally we step off with John […]

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I got thoroughly hooked on Arahant’s Friday post about music that makes you want to dance. All it takes is one dance song, and I’m in that mindset; it’s not hard to conjure track after track to keep the party going. Not every song in the thread did it for me, and I’m sure some of mine would keep most folks in their seats, but it was still a great thread and a great Friday playlist.

Music can transport me in a hurry. It’s similar for other moods. I have go-to hymns for getting into a more spiritual frame of mind. K-Pop existed when I lived in Korea, but it’s more traditional Korean music that takes me back to the streets of Seoul. But when I think of Ireland, I’m more likely to think of the Saw Doctors or U2 than “Danny Boy” and trad. Blues standards can take me back to times I was feeling low and the songs that gave me comfort.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Music that Makes Me…Wanna Dance

 

Okay, Ricochet, this is your chance to shine. I only have a few offerings in this category, so it will be heavily dependent on you. Here’s what I’ve got. Start with something obvious:

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There has been a great deal of good writing over the years, inspired by monthly theme cues. Maybe you missed some, or joined more recently. Instead of searching on tags, just bookmark this post. This index will capture all of them in one post, updated monthly. A big thank-you to past keepers of the themes; […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Sound of Melancholy and Nostalgia

 

Released in 1962, “Champa Battambang” was a big hit for the composer/lyricist/vocalist Sinn Sisamouth. But the song would be immortalized in the Khmer psyche in the years following the fall of the Khmer Rouge. We’ll get to that part in a moment, but first the song and its title: champa is the name of a flower (magnolia champaca) and Battambang is the name of a province in northeast Cambodia.

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Proceed at your own risk. Some of these tunes will stick with you all day, for various reasons. What follows is a small and eclectic cut of songs that are styled children’s music. Some childrens’ music is meant as a calming or amusement source for children. Other songs are songs that children have long made […]

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During the folk boom of the early 1960s, I was practicing on my guitar one day when I thought, “Why don’t I share my talent with the world by rambling around the cities of Europe playing my guitar and singing. Marie would collect the coins that people would throw my way, and we could live off […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Music that Makes Me…Happy

 

We have a lot of things to stress out about right now. To initiate the new topic Clifford Brown has for June Group Writing, I thought it might be good to start with things that make me happy. We can set aside our cares for a few minutes and listen to bouncy, silly, or inane music. So, here’s to you, Ricochet. Does it make you smile?

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 There are two major monthly Group Writing projects. One is the Quote of the Day project, managed by @arahant. This is the other project, in which Ricochet members claim one day of the coming month to write on a proposed theme. This is an easy way to expose your writing to a general audience, with […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Grandpa Reminisces about Homonyms He’s Crossed

 

Ever start thinking about a subject and have your brain reply to a thought with an eyeroll and, “Yes, Grandpa, you have told us about that before.” I was thinking about homonyms, never mind why, and thinking how they must be the bane of most writers’ existences. They are certainly mine.

Now, everyone who writes knows to watch for the common combinations. They’re the ones people get berated for most often on Farcebook and Twender. You know the ones: they’re/there/their and your/you’re/yore. (In days or you’re we used that word a lot.) But there are so many more homonyms that writers stumble over. It’s (ooh, another pair: its/it’s) just the way the brain works while we are composing a bit of text. Once we learn to type at a decent speed, the brain starts to go on semi-automatic. Pull the trigger by thinking of a word and the hands type it out. Or they type something like the word out. Usually it is a homophone.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. May Merriment: Three Slices of Happiness

 

On the way to more serious content, I ran across three very different but equally, quietly, joyful YouTube videos. Enjoy three great slices of Americana:

  •  A woman making cheeseburger pie, with camera work by her husband of many years.
  • A woman and her heavy Chevy.
  • The ice cream man and the truly diverse community he serves.

The cooking video is one of a series, shot in a couple’s kitchen. To be completely accurate, it is clearly the woman’s kitchen, and her husband is there in support and in appreciation of her cooking. How could you not like Mae Mae’s Happy Table? You will surely gain five pounds just watching, but the video is worth the weight.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Group Writing: Wait, Is This Guy Real?

 

The best sorts of parodies and fun are the ones where at first, you think it might be real. As you’re watching for awhile, a few clues start to pop up. I’m thinking about things like the show Fishing with John. Have you never seen Fishing with John? Why not? It’s time you find it and see it. In the first episode where John Lurie goes shark fishing with a friend, it’s a little odd. When I first saw it I thought, well, modern productions by modern musicians, whatever. But with each episode, it got stranger. Tom Waits sticking a live fish in his shorts, well it’s believable. But then Lurie and Willem Dafoe die in the ice fishing wilderness … or so the narrator claims. By that episode, one is already under the impression that the narrator may be unreliable.

So it also was when I first started seeing some of J. P. Sears works. Was this guy for real? Well, no, but he is really funny:

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Group Writing: The Old Master

 

When we speak of parody, there is a very long history, and considering our topic for Group Writing for the month of May is all about such foolishness, I knew I could go to only one source:

The Old Master

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