Tag: greek

Perfection and Its Discontents

 

shutterstock_161407115Greeks promoted the notion of “perfection” – that there was such a thing as a perfect ratio, or a perfect body. And this word and concept has similarly entered our modern world: perfection has become the standard against whom everyone or everything is measured. Sadly, it is also part of our religious thinking as well: the concept that some people are “almost” perfect, for example.

The problem with the notion of perfection is that it is not only hard to achieve, but that it is, itself, a lie.

Take, for example, a simple physical object – a little cube. It might look like a perfect cube, but if you look closely enough, you will find that it is full of imperfections and impurities. The dimensions themselves can only be measured within certain tolerances, limited by instruments. There is nothing in this world that is “perfectly” any dimension at all, given that even a measurement is true only for a specific temperature and atmospheric pressure and composition of the ambient air… the list is endless.

Member Post

 

I just found out that the timeless, usually booze-fueled, sometimes pot-fueled, philosophical debate over the question “what is the difference between ‘morality’ and ‘ethics’ has a very, very simple answer: The word “morality” has a Latin root, while the word “ethics” has a Greek root. Over time, “morality” came to be associated with religion because […]

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