Tag: Great Depression

History and the Vector of Shame

 

Perhaps you have seen the meme that shows WWII soldiers and says something along the lines of “they stormed the beaches for us, we’re just being asked to stay on our couches.” As far as exhortations to stay home go, I suppose it is one of the less annoying and more anodyne ones, but it’s still full of a smug, pompous, and scornful shame directed at us today, extolling the virtues of our honored ancestors over and against the alleged sins of our current generation.

It absolutely reeks of the sort of derision that says “not only are you no better than them, but you’re actually likely a great deal worse since we have to nanny you into staying in your own home.” It is an appeal to heroic nostalgia for a sepia-toned and non-existent past, where somehow the people were “more real,” more manly (or womanly) than today. Putting aside my general annoyance with such nannyism, as a perpetual student of history, I also have to cry foul over the comparison and call it what it is: bilge.

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I was behind a Sanders supporter for a while during my commute today. Two Sanders bumper stickers, two ‘I love science’ type stickers, and an ‘Old School Progressive’ with FDR’s face sticker. I’ve wondered if Leftists revere FDR as much as conservatives revere Reagan or does the appearance that history seems to begin the day […]

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Amity Shlaes joins Seth Barron to discuss the competing goals of economic growth and income equality, and to take a look at how American presidents in the twentieth century have approached these issues.

Polls show that support for income redistribution is growing among younger generations of Americans, but such policies have a poor track record of achieving their goals. As Shlaes writes in her feature story in the Winter 2018 Issue of City Journal: “Prioritizing equality over markets and growth hurts markets and growth and, most important, the low earners for whom social-justice advocates claim to fight.”

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I’ve convinced a liberal friend of mine to meet next week to talk about my view of economics. This comes after he ended a Facebook post on the Senate tax legislation with the rhetorical question “Why would you vote for someone who votes for Supply-Side bull…?”    Preview Open

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I went to public schools from elementary through high school in the 1960’s and in general I think I received a fairly solid K-12 education. There was none of the political correctness nonsense (it was OK to draw a picture of a gun or bring a pocket knife to school), the administrators and teachers reinforced, […]

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And That’s Where It All Went Wrong

 

World History has plenty of moments where a single decision — or a seemingly insignificant act — brought about enduring disaster that appears, in retrospect, to have been be tragically avoidable. The events of late summer of 1914 come to mind.

More obscurely, Winston Churchill famously regretted the monkey who bit King Alexander of Greece on the leg, which caused a fatal infection and set off a succession crisis  in during the Greco-Turkish War, arguably leading to the deaths of a quarter million people.