Tag: google

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Is anyone out there concerned about 1984 coming true? https://pjmedia.com/trending/google-reveals-plans-to-monitor-our-moods-our-movements-and-our-childrens-behavior/ More

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Google Walkout: A Momentary Farce

 

If one just skimmed headlines, one might get the impression that something monumental is happening at Google, one of the most powerful tech giants in the world. Don’t get your hopes up. On closer inspection, the walkout of a few thousand employees is really more identity politics and victimization theater and is yet another example of the histrionics of pampered Leftist employees who work at one of the many preschool-styled Google corporate country clubs convinced that they are continually being oppressed – because that’s what their own HR department has been telling them for years.

One need only examine the demands of the savagely oppressed Googlers to see the farcical elements of this demonstration:

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. “Be Evil”

 

About two years ago, I posted a comment suggesting Google and its Obama-supporting workforce and management might have the power to redirect searches and control information in a way that favored one political point of view. My point was it does not take very much to influence an election outcome. The tools and temptation are there.

As many are aware, Google’s management and staff helped put together the indomitable Obama big data, drill down, finite, targeted social media, voter mobilization effort in 2012. I proffered that Facebook might do the same. My thoughts were dismissed very quickly by some knowledgeable people on Ricochet as impossible given that Google so carefully controls its search algorithm and no such hanky-panky would be tolerated. Who believes this is not possible today?

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. How to Build a Computer 11: The Binary Search Algorithm

 

We’re taking a break from the manufacturing process to cover some ideas in programming. Algorithms, what that means and why. Sounds fancy, doesn’t it? It ain’t as bad as it sounds. Let’s jump right in:

What’s An Algorithm?

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Net Neutrality Gave Us Shadow Banning

 

Where are the liberal free speech advocates? Conservative thought is being silenced. Silicon Valley’s powerful programmers are hiding voices with which they politically disagree by using statist-like media restrictions not dissimilar from North Korea. Kim Jong Un approves. Just this week we saw two new examples:

Project Veritas latest investigation demonstrates Twitter’s shadow banning of conservative accounts:

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I have thought for some time that I ought to unchain myself from Google. Yes, it has a great search engine. Chrome is a great browser and is the most widely used. Gmail is efficient and free. But, I have become uncomfortable about the loss of privacy. I have a Gmail account for personal stuff. […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Are Social Media Platforms Tearing Apart Society’s Social Fabric?

 

Chamath Palihapitiya, one of the early Facebook software engineers tasked a year after its founding with growing Facebook’s user base, warns that Facebook, in which he claims he has only posted on his own account less than 10 times in seven years, and other social media platforms are destroying how society works. Palihapitiya cautions that the dopamine effect of instant gratification with receiving likes encourages addiction to Facebook and other platforms. By the way, please “Like” this post because I need to know you like me … you really like me.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Oh, Brave New World! The Novel World of Big Data.

 

Last week @claire posed the question “What does Facebook know about us?” It is a worthy question, and one not easily answered. Facebook certainly can automatically glean a number of facts about us, but as her post demonstrates, that does not translate necessarily well into knowing us. Why else would she constantly receive ads for products in which she clearly has no interest? Ours is a brave new world of massive data gathering and data mining, where our personal profiles, in any form, are traded much as one would once have traded baseball cards. Yet for all its ubiquitous reach, this is still new, it is still novel, and it is still buggy, as I will relate below.

I have some direct experience as a customer of Google’s Ad Words program, though this experience is now somewhat dated. Six years ago I enrolled my company as a buyer of Google advertising. The program is fairly simple:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Break Up Big Tech? It Wasn’t Long Ago That It Was “Break Up Walmart”

 

Before “Break up Big Tech,” there was “Break up the Big Banks.” And before that, “Break up Walmart.” Oh yeah, lots of interest among a certain group of activists in breaking up the giant retailer. In 2006, for instance, Washington wonk Barry Lynn wrote in Harper’s about “The Case for Breaking Up Wal-Mart” and then again “The Case for Breaking Up Walmart” in 2013 for Foreign Policy.

More recently, Lynn has been a leading proponent of cracking down on the megaplatforms such as Google and Facebook, though perhaps not necessarily breaking them up into smaller companies. But let’s not forget about Walmart, a company Lynn once described as having such vast power that it actually “subverts the functioning of the free market.”

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Is Google Docs the Latest Front in Google Censorship?

 

People are getting locked out of innocuous Google Docs for supposedly violating the terms of service. From The Verge:

Google Docs users are reporting various bugs today that result in them getting locked out of their documents. Most of the issues center on a mysterious Terms of Service violation.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Facebook Has a Public Trust Problem, While We Trust Amazon Like a Bank

 

Call them the $500 billion club. Apple, Alphabet-Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook all now have stock market capitalizations of at least a half trillion bucks. They’re the only ones to breach that level (for the moment) and are currently the five most valuable stocks. And their massive value and power have put the Biggest of Big Tech squarely in the focus of legislators, regulators, and activists.

Especially, I guess, Facebook, which is the main player in the controversy over Russian meddling in the 2016 US presidential election. In The Wall Street Journal, Christopher Mims outlines all the various battles that the company currently finds itself waging. Among them: Some in Congress wants to force Facebook and other internet companies to tell users who fund political ads. States want “to prevent the company from identifying our faces without our express permission.” Then there’s Europe, where new regulation taking effect next year “opens a Pandora’s box of potential liabilities for all tech companies around how they handle and exploit individuals’ data, guard against breaches and transfer information across national borders.”

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Last week, I published a list of liberal clichés and their real meanings. The style was, of course, based on The Devil’s Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce, while many of the entries were plagiarized from inspired by Jonah Goldberg’s The Tyranny of Clichés. I asked for ideas on further entries in the comments, and this addendum […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Will Apple, Google, Facebook, and Amazon Be Forever Dominant?

 
President Donald Trump, Satya Nadella of Microsoft, and Jeff Bezos of Amazon.

I’m skeptical that Washington will break up Big Tech like it did Standard Oil or AT&T. Likewise, New York Times tech columnist Farhad Manjoo also doubts such action is on the near horizon, or really governmental action of any kind. One difference is that Manjoo — who refers to Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft as the “Frightful Five” — seems far closer than I am to being convinced strong action is necessary. From his lede: “The tech giants are too big. They’re getting bigger. We can stop them. But in all likelihood, we won’t.”

Like I said, I’m not there yet. But one thing that could nudge me a bit closer is the certainty that the megaplatforms were dampening US innovation. And that’s just the argument being made, anecdotally at least, by Erin Griffith in Wired.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. John Hinderaker: Vegas Politicized, NRA, and Anti-Trust for Google?

 

On this episode of Whiskey Politics, John Hinderaker joins us to discuss the horrific massacre in Las Vegas, the instant politicization by the Left, the NRA, and assault weapons, and we also tackle how Google, Facebook, and other large internet companies may fall under the anti-trust legislation as they appear to limit free speech.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. National Review’s John O’Sullivan

 

John O'SullivanJohn O’Sullivan joins Whiskey Politics and generously covers many issues, starting with O’Sullivan’s Law: “All organizations that are not actually right-wing will over time become left-wing.” We discuss Trump’s UN speech, North Korea (#Dotard!), William F. Buckley, today’s National Review and those opposing Trump, Europe in the age of Trump, why the conservative Australian model for immigration works, the worldwide attacks on free speech, and should Google and Facebook be nationalized?

John is a former editor at National Review and since been editor-at-large at National Review and a senior fellow at the National Review Institute. He is also president of the Danube Institute, a think tank devoted to promoting conservative and classical liberal ideas in Budapest, from where we had a fascinating discussion earlier this year with the Deputy Director and John’s better half, Melissa O’Sullivan. John also serves as director of 21st Century Initiatives in Washington DC. For decades John has been read, seen, and heard across the media and served as Editor or Editor-in-Chief at many publications including The Times (London), Daily Telegraph, New York Post editorial, and others.

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Much ink has been spilled over the debate about Google exercising their right of Freedom of Association in firing Mr. James Damore over his memo. The overall conservative point is that freedom of speech is not freedom of consequence and that Google has the right of Freedom of Association. Several responses to this have suggested […]

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https://www.blog.google/topics/journalism-news/new-machine-learning-app-reporting-hate-america/ I think it’s time for me to move on from Google. It takes a lot for me to avoid a company as I don’t usually care to boycott anything. But As Jake Chambers almost said “There are other email services than these.”  More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. [email protected]

 

Google’s Ideological Echo Chamber,” the memo written by Google’s now-fired software engineer James Damore, addresses a taboo topic in modern American life — namely, sex differences that relate to the abilities and occupational choices of men and women.

Damore’s critique of diversity and inclusion, which he supports in the abstract, hit the tech industry hard for this very simple reason: firms like Google and Facebook have tech workforces dominated by white and Asian men. As Damore observes, Google has spent millions on programs to recruit and hire more women and non-Asian minorities, with little to show for its efforts. He urges Google: “Stop restricting programs and classes to certain genders and races,” and to “de-moralize diversity.” In his view, this reverse discrimination drives Google’s rigid, ideological conformity, lowers overall production, and undercuts professional morale.

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What are the most effective ways to punish Gulag? 1. Search engine – I switched to Duck Duck Go. More

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Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for August 11, 2017 it’s the Vive La Difference edition of the podcast with your hosts, nanoscientist Mike Stopa, and, would you believe it? co-host and Smart Girl Extraordinaire Teri Christoph! But then, where’s Todd??? Wish we knew. He is off on a soul-finding three month journey of non-stop silence in the Peruvian jungle, on a diet of roasted banana peels and tropical bird sushi. We expect him back next week.

In the meantime, Mike and Teri get to bubble our way through topics ludicrous and absurd for your listening pleasure. Look, the vibe is a little different than usual. I, for one, had a fabulous time.

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