Tag: Godfather

ACF Critic Series #9: Paul Cantor

 

We’re adding a new critic to the ACF podcast: America’s eminent Shakespearian, Paul Cantor! He’s a writer I admire and from whom I have learned much on Shakespeare–much to my surprise and delight, he’s getting into film criticism in a big way and he’s in the mood to talk about it. We have a long interview to offer you, the first in a series of discussions about pop culture in America. We go from Godfather to Breaking Bad, we get to super-hero movies and ancient mythic heroes–to tragedy in Greece and in Shakespeare’s England–and lots of other things about TV and movies in-between. Also, we do more than a little talking about Mark Twain. Listen and share friends, join the conversation in the comments, and read more Cantor!

ACF#23 – The Godfather: Part III

 

Today, John Presnall and I conclude our trilogy of podcasts on The Godfather trilogy. We defend the greatness of the film and of the tragic conclusion. This is the best tragic work done in Hollywood in at least the last two generations and it deserves its fine reputation. But to understand its greatness requires to see how the third movie completes the story by a turn to moral realism. It begins to explain all the suffering we see throughout the trilogy. And to stir controversy, John and I compare the Corleone family to the Adams family, with a hat tip to historian Richard Brookhiser, America’s own Plutarch.

ACF#22: Godfather Part II

 

Today, John Presnall and I complete our discussion of The Godfather. We look at how Part II reverses the structure of the original–we move from a young Michael and adult Vito to the reverse. Mario Puzo and Francis Ford Coppola thus complete the portrayals of the two generations. Then we also discuss the all-American story of the immigrant Corleone family, of making it in New York, moving out West, and going international in Cuba. The Corleones rehearse American history and this changes the non-American Sicilian principle of “True Friendship” Vito tries to adapt to the New World.

ACF Middlebrow #6: Paul Rahe

 

The ACF Middlebrow podcast continues with Hillsdale Professor Paul Rahe! We discuss the film he most assigns in class, Coppola and Puzo’s The Godfather, and the perfect introduction for young American college students to the study of different regimes, ancient and modern. We answer the question: How did the Martin Scorsese movie Silence inspire the professor to think about Western politics and the dichotomy between Caesar and Christ? Listen, comment, and share, folks! Please review & rate us on iTunes!

ACF Critic Series #1

 

Happy New Year, fellow Ricochetti. The ACF is introducing, along with our flagship movie podcast and the Middlebrow series, a Critic series. Our first guest is one of my favorites, Armond White, of NRO and Out magazine, formerly of City Arts and other venues. He is the gritty reboot of American criticism–the hero we need even, if not necessarily the one we deserve. No one is more counter-cultural and there is nothing more needful, because it is absent, than counter-cultural voices and thoughts. If you want to get to know a man who thinks of criticism as a vocation and whose love of American pop culture is both deep and spontaneous, he’s your guy.

ACF#21 The Godfather

 

Happy New Year! Here at the ACF, we decided to give you a great American family story for the season of feasts! Join us in exploring the exciting Corleone family, much-beloved of Democrats, because they’re immigrants, and of Republicans, because they’re business men, job creators, and family men.