Tag: gifts

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. What are Your Gifts?

 

I was inspired by an idea from Dr. Bastiat’s post on intelligence. @django mentioned that he was a person who could see things outside the standard patterns that others missed. That’s quite a gift. I was thinking that each of us (unless you’re a young whippersnapper) knows our gifts, especially those that we appreciate and others do, too!

For example, I have been told in certain environments when things are confused and chaotic that I can see into the heart of the matter, and can clarify the situation for others. I like having that ability and having it appreciated. I also have convinced people that I am a person who handles conflict well and tend to be balanced and even-tempered on Ricochet. You should see me in real life! Actually, my experiences on Ricochet have helped me grow a great deal in this regard, so I consider those of you who have “triggered” me to be my teachers. Thank you.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I know some of you have heard all this before. Well too bad. Here it is again. More

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Unexpected Gift: The Gifts From Trees

 

When we first got married, my wife and I lived in a one bedroom apartment. A couple of years later, we moved to a new house that was part of a large development mostly built on open farmland. As a result, the only trees we had were those that we planted.

After 25 years, we finally found a “different” type of house in the country and have lived there for the last nineteen years. This house and property were part of a larger farm and is about 3.5 Acres, with about an acre of woods included in the back. As a result, I couldn’t begin to count the number of trees that we “own” – or own us.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Unexpected Gifts – Sons

 

Today is my middle son’s 33rd birthday, the one I call Pipeliner because he is a pipeline engineer. I have three sons, born four and a half years apart. All of them are unexpected gifts. They were not unexpected in the sense of their arrival, we wanted all three. Rather, the unexpected gifts are the delightful surprises all three have provided.

My oldest is a genius, literally, he tested as such (it runs in the family, my two brothers are geniuses. I am not. That makes me the dumb one in the family.) He is even smart enough to understand the limitations of genius. (Too many smart people treat genius the way a bandit treats a firearm. They act as if all you have to do is wave it around and you get what you want, even when you do not use it.) It was an unexpected gift to have someone with whom I could engage intellectually over the dinner table.

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Are intangible items (not physical things) gifts socially appropriate? I think intangible items often make the best gifts. So I was surprised when, on a recent LadyBrains podcast, @bethanymandel said she got push-back when she suggested for a gift-giving occasion a gift of membership to a zoo or a museum for her family. Apparently the […]

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This week on Banter, whistling champion and Managing Director and Director of Global Communications at the Carlyle Group Chris Ullman joined the show to discuss his new book, “Find Your Whistle: Simple Gifts Touch Hearts and Change Lives” as well as his career trajectory in Washington, DC. Prior to joining Carlyle, Ullman worked in government […]

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When it comes to Christmas, I’m a survivor. Every January, I pack away the decorations (neatly organized), relieved that it will be a whole year before I have to deal with them again. Then the year goes by swiftly, partly due to the looming merry season, and I can’t believe I’m hauling out those bins […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Haven’t Got a Gift for Dad Yet? Here’s What Not to Get:

 

The Man Hanger: This is a clothes-hanger… but for men. It’s “Bent by hand from industrial-grade rebar,” and costs $25 per hanger. For those emergencies where Dad finds his “manly attire too much for wimpy regular hangers.” Yes, some regular hangers are wimpy. Others are not and will take up less space in your closet than rebar. And they don’t cost $25 a pop. If Dad is planning to hang a side of beef in the closet, he might appreciate a rebar hanger for Father’s Day. But otherwise, all this gift tells Dad is that he failed to teach you the value of a buck.

$200 Smart Socks with Matching Anklet: Yes, smart socks are a thing. The most annoying thing you’ll ever own, given the tendency of socks to file for divorce in the laundry. Many women have trouble keeping their socks from divorcing, and not to gender stereotype or anything, but men are usually worse at this than women. In all likelihood, all a gift of “smart socks” does is waste a serious chunk of change on annoying the “lucky” father who receives them. Now you’ve gone beyond, “Dad didn’t teach me the value of a buck” to “Annoying Daddy is worth at least 200 bucks to me.”

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Membership Challenge, Be Healed

 

Anyone who visits Ricochet regularly feels drawn to something. I love Ricochet’s podcasts, from the mothership to the latest experiments. I already consider Ricochet the home for the best center-right podcasts on the web. I want to see that family of podcasts thrive.

For a few months I have stared at the progress bar atop the Ricochet homepage and felt vexed that it has not moved far past the midway point. Today I will do my small part to change that by giving three Ricochet memberships to people who are dear to me.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

My klutzy self has not been doing anyone any favors lately, whether what I’m breaking is computers or body parts. By falling off a stepladder, I neatly put the kibosh on having a few good days before Christmas to do the gift planning I’ve till now done earlier in the year. At first, nothing seemed […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Post-Christmas Blues, or Nostalgia Ain’t What It Used to Be

 

shutterstock_99661805I would occasionally view some Ricochet essays that tiptoed on the lighter side of life in a less than interested mood; until, that is, I submitted one of my own ditties that explored the profundities of Blazing Saddles, which is surely a great representation of modern artistic sensibilities. But much of the time, it has been a matter of trying to break free from a “Most liberals are fascists!” mentality, and that’s hard to do, especially since the comparison increasingly seems unfair to fascists.

Then Christmas came along, a time of great joy and celebration, of course, when all thoughts of politics, culture, and the frequent nastiness of things in general needed to be put aside. It was an occasion to immerse oneself into a sugar-plums-dancing-in-your-ears, Jack-Frost-roasting-on-an-open-fire, Hillary-free day, to be enjoyed by everyone in the household ranging in age from seven months to seven decades or so. Christmas music hummed in the background, red and green lights twinkled everywhere, peals of laughter and mirth rippled through the air, a 90-pound black Labrador imitated a lap dog, trying out one lap after another — things didn’t get better than that. Until, that is, the first present was opened, in this case, by one of the grandchildren.

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I a recent Daily Shot mentioned giving your wife a vacuum cleaner for Christmas is the worst thing you can give. I think not. More

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I thought this would be easy. Foolish me. Having years of written devotions and reflections at my disposal, I figured it would be a simple matter to select and adapt one to suit my purposes for a post on this wonderful series (and it has been wonderful, hasn’t it?). And yet, out of all of […]

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Nothing can quite prepare you for the experience of parenthood, save perhaps having siblings significantly younger than yourself. We married in June of 1999, me fresh out of college and my wife at the end of her first year of law school. Over the prior year we had been to a number of friends’ weddings, […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. An Unexpected Gift

 

41nGNc2G5WL[1]“Here, take it. It’s for you.” Mr. Mandelbaum pressed a book into my hands. Mr. Mandelbaum was a fixture in the synagogue. Sweet, mild-mannered, and a little stooped, the nonagenarian widower still lived independently and attended daily services, morning and afternoon. As a teenager, I had little reason to interact with him, and saw him only on Shabbat. The gift was completely unexpected; it took me a moment to process the situation and thank him.

The book was a treatise on illuminated Hebrew manuscripts, with vivid color reproductions. Mr. Mandelbaum had inscribed it to me in his aged, shaky block writing: “In memory of your grandparents wo [sic] were my good friends.” He had misspelled my name. Also, Mr. Mandelbaum’s use of the past tense didn’t make sense; he and my grandmother were still alive. Perhaps, I thought, the errors could be attributed to a bit of senility. I was touched by the gift nonetheless.

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This is getting to be a habit. I have one post ready. I’m about to push publish in the eleventh hour, when external forces switch things up. It was as if lightening or a heavenly force struck me. My fingers went to keys to share this story. More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Again, here are a number of links I almost posted on, but couldn’t find a good angle on. I present them here for your enjoyment before they go stale. Please feel free to steal any of them for a real post if it catches your interest. * One of my favorite books this past year […]

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