Tag: Gettysburg

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It began when the pastor at a lovely Christmas Eve church service in South Lake Tahoe, California, made a gentle joke about Bakersfield. He was citing how Christ’s influence on society includes the names of major California cities, such as San Francisco (“Saint Francis”) and Los Angeles (“City of Angels”). Insert comments here about the […]

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Quote of the Day: For Us the Living…

 

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Did a Burning Bridge Change History?

 

In just a few days, we will celebrate, or at least honor, two remarkably significant events of American history. They both occurred in Pennsylvania, one obviously in 1776, the other in 1863. But a third one – also in the Keystone State, also in 1863 – deserves some recognition today (June 28th), its anniversary.

The first and most obvious is American Independence Day, July 4th, celebrating our Declaration of Independence from Great Britain and its “Mad King,” George III. The second would occur just 87 years later on a battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

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Reflections on a Divided Nation: In 1913, the 50th anniversary of Gettysburg, aging veterans were asked to re-enact Pickett’s charge and the Union defense. Instead, the grizzled, doddering and short-of-breath survivors hurried–as best they could–to meet between the lines and embrace their old enemies.  All of those men are long dead now.  So too, it […]

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Quote of the Day: The Gettysburg Address

 

Image result for the gettysburg address image“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.” — President Abraham Lincoln, Nov. 19, 1863

Since Lincoln’s delivery 156 years ago, the Gettysburg Address has been parsed and analyzed for its meaning and importance.* I don’t intend to offer my own analysis, but rather to commemorate Lincoln’s eloquence on that day. This post’s title is referring to recent Ricochet posts with the title “Fewer Words” because I think Lincoln’s speech is one of the best examples of how brevity can improve communication.

On this aspect of the Gettysburg Address, I offer the following bonus quote:

On Sandstone Buddhas and Southern Belles

 

Gettysburg National Cemetery

In the summer of 2017, I find myself writing occasional opinion pieces on politics and the Left. In the summer of 2014, I found myself standing on a hill in a remote area of Kentucky called Fluty Lick. In the summer of 2001, I found myself standing on Route 3 in New Jersey, looking at the Manhattan skyline. In the summer of 1995, I found myself reading a minor news article about Afghanistan. In the summer of 1980, I found myself in the company of a genuine southern belle.