Tag: Germany

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. More Bad History

 

With the announcement that President Trump wanted to bring up to one-third of US troops from our permanent bases in Germany, Rep. Liz Cheney tweeted out the following:

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The American wit Will Rogers once said, “All I know is what I read in the papers.” And as far as James and Toby are concerned, ol’ Will wouldn’t have known anything about the state of the world today. Why is the mainstream media missing so much during this pandemic and why do you have to turn to obscure websites – like LockdownSceptics.org – to find out what’s really going on?

 

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Germany Prays Together: An Unprecedented Public Event

 

Back in 2015, I moved with my family to Augsburg to work with a number of Christian ministries here in Germany, chief among them the Augsburg House of Prayer. It is from that ministry that a new initiative has sprung in response to the XiJinPing-Virus-inspired crisis here in Europe. It is called Deutschland Betet Gemeinsam and you can read more about it in German here.  Since it was organized (all of ten days ago, give or take), it has spread internationally to include participating churches and ministries in Austria and Switzerland. What is really novel and encouraging about it is that Christians of all major streams of the faith — Catholic, Evangelical, Eastern Orthodox, Messianic Jewish — and Orthodox Jews from all over the German-speaking world will be praying together in public. The event will be held on Wednesday, April 8, from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Central European Time. If you have the inclination, you can certainly join from abroad.

And as promised, the translation of the prayer from the website:

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In 2015, I reviewed Hans Fallada’s great novel of the late Weimar era, Little Man, What Now? Today’s review is of another Fallada novel, this one set earlier in Weimar, during the time of the great–insane–inflation. Wolf Among Wolves tells the story of a collapsing society through the intertwined lives of many characters, who include: […]

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Citizens often complain taxes are too high or too regressive or too widespread. The stubborn resilience of specific taxes said to be “temporary” when adopted solidify like crabgrass under societies. The Feds’ continued use of the Revenue Act after its supposed expiration in 1872 took an 1894 Supreme Court ruling to kill it. America adopted […]

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Should we be worried about its completion? Are sanctions an appropriate and effective response? From Radio Free Europe:  More

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see France, Germany, and the UK conclude that Iran attacked Saudi Arabia earlier this month and that there is no other plausible explanation. They also groan over the political circus about to begin as House Democrats appear to be moving en masse towards impeachment and even President Trump seems to like the idea of getting impeached because it would help him win re-election. And they discuss the dystopian world Bernie Sanders wants us all to live in as he proposes a ludicrous wealth tax to pay for the massive expansion of government that he envisions.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Rebalancing Forces

 

BrownLandSalesTwo news items caught my eye this weekend, both of them in Stars and Stripes. One story was from Korea, and the other from Germany. Together, they told a story of rebalancing our forces in the world.

The first story is about the activation of a group of new Army Reserve units in Europe. This was a growth in the total number of units or end strength in the Army Reserve. Instead, this was a relatively typical rebalancing of types of units in different parts of the world.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The G-BA is the worst

 

A group of regulators from Germany published in the British Medical Journal a recommendation on how drug companies should design clinical trials. These “recommendations” curiously align with Germany’s unwillingness to pay for efficacious drugs.

There are two regulatory bodies in Germany that check whether a new drug is better than an old treatment and pay accordingly, IQWiG and the G-BA. Not surprisingly when the Germans decided to check most new drugs they found that a majority of them (56%) showed “no added benefit.” Notwithstanding the obvious conflict of interest with the German government both approving and paying for new drugs, there are two major problems with Germany’s approval process. The unnecessary cost they are asking the drug companies to absorb and the capricious way they judge whether a drug is efficacious.

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I think we should have an ongoing effort (can’t be one topic) to offer suggestions for the “most brainless but likely to be troublesome” human behavior story of the week or month. Mine is below, about German protestors at a coal facility, of the “climate change is urgent, so to hell with democracy or common […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A Tale of Two Tales Following Morsi’s Death

 

Mohammad Morsi, who was elected president of Egypt leading an Islamist party, died in court late Monday. He had been deposed by the military after imposing an Islamist constitution and showing his ties to the Muslim Brotherhood more clearly. The military acted after a second wave of popular unrest showed people wanted change, but not quite the change Morsi seemed to be delivering.

France24 reports Morsi was buried Tuesday, in keeping with the custom of burial as soon after death as possible:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. ACF Critic Series #28: Never Look Away

 

There is a new Donnersmarck movie, Never Look Away, a brilliant successor to the famous The Lives Of Others, so we are getting the team back together. @FlaggTaylor and Carl Eric Scott join me on the podcast for a long, wide-ranging discussion about art and tyranny, about the relationship between beauty and politics, and what great movies can offer by way of meditation on our search for freedom. Flagg and Carl co-edited the book on Donnersmarck’s marvelous, Oscar-winning debut, The Lives of Others.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. President Trump Rocks Out with Real Heavy Metal Band

 

The afternoon of 20 March 2019, President Trump rocked out with a group that makes real heavy metal. The event was different from other presidential appearances, but featured many of the same themes. Two themes, American defense revival and energy dominance, stood in stark contrast to news from Germany. In the midst of the prepared remarks, with the usual riffs, President Trump elaborated on his criticism of the politician John McCain, who the appointed Senator from Arizona, Martha McSally, is unconditionally defending, raising questions about her viability or suitability in 2020. President Trump’s visit to the Lima Army Tank Plant was a great political messaging success on several levels.

The setting:

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A 9-year-old boy lobbied successfully to get his town’s ban on snowball fights overturned. Reminded me of some comments by Goethe, circa 1828. He observed that when Englishmen came to town, they were invariably a hit with the local women. Indeed, when one of them came to visit, Goethe found it necessary to brace himself […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

U.S. Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell on Iran Sanctions Snapback, America’s Energy Competition with Russia in the EU, Chancellor Merkel U.S. Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell occupies one of the most critical positions in American diplomacy, not only because Germany represents the EU’s largest economy and has disproportionate influence on the continent, but because of […]

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From Rorate Caeli: Der Spiegel is the most important center-left weekly in Europe. Created in post-war Germany, it provides every week the “acceptable view” for liberal minds in the Federal Republic and, therefore, in all of Europe. It is the essential “Gutmensch” media source. More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Dennis Prager on the Self-Righteously Suicidal West and False Morality

 

For this week’s Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten podcast, I had nationally syndicated radio host, columnist, author of numerous books, teacher, film producer and co-founder of PragerU, Dennis Prager, on the podcast to discuss among other things:

  • How Dennis Prager ended up a conservative as an Ivy League-educated Jewish intellectual from Brooklyn, New York — contrary to so many of his peers
  • How perceptions of human nature divide Left and Right
  • Whether government has filled the void of religion for the increasingly secular and progressive American coasts
  • How the good intentions that underlie Leftist policy prescriptions lead to horrendous outcomes — and emotion versus reason on the Left and Right
  • The false morality underlying European immigration policy with respect to the Muslim world, and Prager’s criticism of Jewish support of mass immigration consisting disproportionately of Jew-haters
  • The self-righteous suicidalism of the West
  • The Leftist bias of social media platforms and PragerU’s legal battle with YouTube/Google

You can find the episode on iTunes, everywhere else podcasts are found, download the episode directly here or read the transcript here.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Jet Engines, GE, and Herman the German

 

General Electric has fallen on hard times, but it has some valuable assets. Of those operations that will remain following the spinoffs and divestitures, the crown jewel is, by general agreement, the jet engine business. I’m reminded of Gerhard Neumann, who played a major role in creating that business and who wrote a wonderful memoir.

This is the autobiography of a man who was born to a Jewish family in Germany, apprenticed as an auto mechanic, attended engineering school, moved to China in 1938, was interned by the British as an enemy alien in 1939, transferred to the American forces, joined Claire Chennault’s Flying Tigers, repaired the first Japanese Zero fighter to be captured in potentially-flyable condition, became a U.S. citizen by special act of Congress, and went on to run GE’s entire jet engine business, which he played a major role in creating. (The preceding may be the longest single sentence I’ve ever written in a blog post.) The book should be of interest to those interested in aviation, technology, management, social history, the WWII era, and/or China.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Anti-Semitism Worldwide: It’s Getting Worse

 

The cancer of anti-Semitism hasn’t been cured; it’s only gone into remission. These days it’s making a notable re-entry worldwide. By looking at France, the United Kingdom, and Germany, we can get a pretty good idea of the reasons for the increase; we can also take a look at the problem in the United States. And we can’t fool ourselves into thinking that there’s going to be a quick or easy cure.

There are 500,000 Jews living in France:

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The good news for Angela Merkel is to be re-elected to a fourth term as German chancellor. The bad news is fashioning a working coalition of political parties divided over taxes, immigration, and climate policy. Hoover Institution senior fellow Russell Berman examines the options available to Germany’s chancellor, including any changes to her roles on the European and world stages.

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