Tag: George Will

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I don’t read him any more.  He is such an elitist prig for my taste, even before he went on this NevrerTrump derangement.  I just stumbled on this column – it’s not even his latest – and I would have normally passed it up until I saw the headline.  At first I thought it was […]

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I can’t wait to get George Will’s new book “The Conservative Sensibility.”  I ordered in both as a book and CD.  There were a couple of great podcast interviews with George Will that were posted at Ricochet.  See http://ricochet.com/podcast/aei-banter/george-f-will-on-the-conservative-sensibility/, and http://ricochet.com/podcast/q-and-a/george-f-will-and-the-conservative-sensibility/ Here is one more from The Bulwark: https://podcast.thebulwark.com/george-will-on-the-conservative-sensibility Preview Open

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I know I am late joining the discussion of the late Charles Krauthammer and his impact on politics, psychology, life, etc.  Tributes have been posted by countless people who read his columns, heard his speeches and watched his TV appearances. Not to mention the personal remembrances from the multitude of friends he cultivated throughout all walks […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are pleasantly surprised to see a new CBS poll showing that a strong plurality of Americans believe families should stay together but be sent back to their home countries when they come to the U.S. illegally.  They also slam Rep. Maxine Waters for suggesting protesters should loudly confront every Trump administration cabinet member whether in restaurants or at the gas station.  And they categorically reject columnist George Will’s call for conservatives to vote Democrats into the majorities of the House and Senate as punishment for Republicans who refuse to stand up to President Trump.

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Article about George W. Bush ranting against Trump. This makes me sick. Like George Will (another George W!) he likes Obama better than Trump. This is a serious problem in this country. We have people who worry more about decorum than actions. Leftist anti-American actions with nice decorum win out with these incompetent Republican politicians. […]

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George Will — the token “conservative commentator” the Democrat Media Complex likes to  have on panels with 3 or 4 liberals — is very sad that the Republican nominee is Donald Trump. So sad is George Will that he not only wants Trumpy to lose, he wants Trump to lose in a devastating electoral landslide that probably loses the […]

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George Will, The GOP, And Conservatism

 

George Will has a new piece at NRO about the relationship between the conservative movement and the Republican party. I’d like to focus on his second to last paragraph in which he writes,

The beginning of conservative wisdom is recognition that there is an end to everything: Nothing lasts. If Trump wins, the GOP ends as a vehicle for conservatism. And a political idea without a political party is an orphan in an indifferent world.

The Campus Accountability and Safety Act Would Mildly Improve Campus Due Process

 

shutterstock_238978654The Campus Accountability and Safety Act (CASA) is the subject of a spectacularly poorly researched article by George Will last week, and has been raised by a number of Ricochetti, so I thought it was worth working out what it does. The Act is not going to pass this year, but it’s worth understanding the legislation in contention (even if it doesn’t pass) and this will almost certainly be reintroduced next year and it might pass then. There are some criticisms of it that are simply incorrect. Thus, for instance, the use of the term “victim” in a crime survey context is not a violation of anyone’s civil rights and it’s not new (as anyone could tell if they looked at the law being amended). There are also aspects of Will’s argument that I think are clearly wrong, but on which I would appreciate correction. Happily, Ricochet seems like the place in which to educate myself.

CASA Contents: Higher Education Act

The CASA substantively amends three acts, as well as clarifying its lack of impact on a fourth and calling for a study to be written. Firstly, it amends the Higher Education Act, to require that universities make their protocols more transparent, formally allocate responsibilities with local law enforcement, and review their agreement every two years. If the police and university cannot agree, there is a substantial fine unless the institution submitted a form explaining the problem, showing that it had attempted in good faith to come to an agreement, and including the university’s final proposed agreement. In the 2014 version of the bill, the Secretary could then decide whether or not to impose crippling fines. In the 2015 version of the bill, the Secretary does not have that choice.

Trump Reconsidered

 

It’s time for those of us holding our noses at Trump to reconsider our approach. He’s not our cup of tea, but he may be a cup we have to drink from. Barring a minor miracle in Iowa, or a major one in New Hampshire, Trump is going to be our nominee. He may even be the president. It’s time we tried to make that unwanted cup as palatable as possible.

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Some of us at Ricochet (including me) have criticized Will in the past.  But in “The Constitution Is Clear: Congress Should Legislate, Not the Administrative State,” George Will gets it right.  He’s writing on the delegation of legislative power from Congress to the executive branch, endorsing important critiques of that delegation from Clarence Thomas and […]

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I’m a Victim and That Makes Me Better Than You

 

CampusLast year, George Will got into a heap of trouble for a column in which he wrote that colleges and universities are learning that “when they say campus victimizations are ubiquitous … and that when they make victimhood a coveted status that confers privileges, victims proliferate.”

It wasn’t a particularly great column by the author’s standards: It was a little unfocused and too easily allowed for ungenerous readings that implied Will was downplaying sexual assault. (It would almost certainly have fared better had it been published after the exposure of the Rolling Stone/University of Virginia hoax). The resulting outrage was enough to get Will disinvited from a speaking gig at Scripps College, a women’s college in Claremont, California. Will’s position gets some support, however, from a new paper by sociologists Bradley Campbell and Jason Manning, summarized at length by Jonathan Haidt at his The Righteous Mind blog.

The study posits that the West is in the process of a third major cultural shift. In brief, it argues that we began as an honor-based society characterized by a low tolerance for slights and a strong preference for seeking personal redress (think of the characters of the Iliad or duelists in the early American Republic). Over the past few centuries, we’ve shifted to a culture based more on personal dignity, which encouraged people to shrug off all but the worst slights as being beneath their notice and to appeal to third-party authorities for redress of the most intolerable wrongs.

Which Wise Man of Conservatism is Correct?

 

shutterstock_37832320I have been struck this week by the divergent opinions of two wise men of conservatism, George Will and Victor Davis Hanson. Will thinks Americans are too mired in pessimism:

The world might currently seem unusually disorderly, but it can be so without being unusually dangerous. If we measure danger by the risk of violence, the world is unusually safe. For this and other reasons, Americans should curb their pessimism.

He points out that terrorist groups in the past have been more lethal, and, though ISIS is nasty, he agrees with President Obama that it poses no existential threat to the US or the West in general. Even its beheadings and other atrocities echo those found in public executions in Shakespeare’s London. With time, this kind of barbarism recedes as cultures mature. Russia, as a nuclear state, is a more worrisome problem, but its ramshackle economy makes sanctions likely to be effective. So we should not be so worried about the state of the world.

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In a talk at Brigham Young University about a year ago, George Will drew a line from the National Recovery Administration to the Senate Immigration Bill and showed how both are examples of a government that thinks it knows so much that it must regulate all the minutiae of your daily life.   First, he […]

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George Will’s Advice to John Boehner and Mitch McConnell

 

On Wednesday, as the dust was settling, George Will published a column that deserves attention. In it, he suggested a number of measures that John Boehner and Mitch McConnell should press as soon as the new Congress meets.

Some of his suggestions are obvious: the Republicans should repeal the tax on medical devices, authorize construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, mandate completion of the nuclear waste respository in Nevada’s Yucca mountain. Passing these will place President Obama in the awkward position of following their lead or vetoing these popular and sensible measures.

Get the Politics Out of Money

 

George Will’s Prager University video on the regulation of political speech is one of the best the site has ever produced: it’s insightful, slick, and hard-hitting without being explicitly partisan. Watch the whole thing and post it on Facebook; it might get someone thinking. Towards the end, however, Will makes a point in passing that deserved more attention: