Tag: George Washington

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While our woke cultural march through institutions to “cancel” people of unforgivable past “sins” continues unabated, their battlefield has expanded to include not just Confederate statues (and a few Unionists), but now logos and street names. At least in a couple of large northern Virginia counties. It apparently has not yet reached multi-unit housing developments, […]

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Gerard Robinson and Cara Candal talk with David Hackett Fischer, University Professor and Earl Warren Professor of History Emeritus at Brandeis University, and the author of numerous books, including Paul Revere’s Ride and the Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington’s Crossing. As America prepares to celebrate the Fourth of July, they review key figures who helped secure independence from Great Britain, including Paul Revere, immortalized in Longfellow’s classic poem, and Founding Father George Washington, known among his contemporaries as the “indispensable man” of the revolutionary cause. Fischer sets the scene for the famous midnight ride, describing what students should know about colonial Boston, and why the British Empire posed such an existential threat to the colonists’ understanding of their rights and liberties as Englishmen. The conversation turns to the lessons teachers and young people today should learn about George Washington’s character, weaknesses, and military leadership during the colonists’ improbable victory against the most powerful empire in the world at that time. He also offers a preview of his forthcoming book, African Founders.

Stories of the Week: In New Jersey, the state’s Supreme Court upheld a lower court decision allowing expansion of seven Newark charter schools approved by the education commissioner, clearing the path for charters to serve thousands more students. In Massachusetts, the education commissioner is under fire from the state’s congressional delegation for proposing to temporarily freeze $400 million in Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) funding earmarked for Boston Public Schools, due to concerns related to the Boston School Committee, which has experienced a string of resignations in the past year.

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Good news. Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia – a town that is also home to the state-supported Virginia Military Institute and Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson, and an ignominious restaurant called the “Red Hen” – will not be changing its name to remove Robert E. Lee. So say their Board of Trustees. And it wasn’t even close. If you’ve […]

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Good news. Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia – a town that is also home to the state-supported Virginia Military Institute and Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson, and an ignominious restaurant called the “Red Hen” – will not be changing its name. So says their Board of Trustees. And the vote wasn’t close. If you’ve […]

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George Washington vs. Washington DC’s Debt

 

Our nation’s founders were keenly aware of the habits of mind necessary to self-governance. Public thrift was considered essential to prosperity and stability. They knew from reading history that financial insolvency was a primary destroyer of great civilizations.

George Washington among others warned against “ungenerously throwing upon posterity the burden which we ourselves are to bear.”

They would see everything they feared most unfolding now in 21st-century America, capped by the financial disaster we have created out of a viral pandemic. We have so far added over $4 trillion in Covid spending, all of it paid for by our fantasy credit card.

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Ace of Spades links to a recent article at the Federalist by David Marcus, in which he notes of conservatives who have offered little resistance to the toppling of certain statues: [A]fter you write your little op-ed about how of course the evil Confederate statues have to come down, they still think you’re a racist. […]

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Quote of the Day: Washington on China

 

Yesterday’s Quote of the Day was Solzhenitsyn on China shared by @richardeaston. In the conversation that followed, @hangon replied:

If you follow Solzhenitsyn’s logic, no alliances would ever be formed since all countries and governments at some level have diverging interests. To defeat the Soviet Union, we tacitly allied with not only China but with fundamental Islam. (Remember them?) Solzhenitsyn’s idea is extremely naive.

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As we inch closer to the 2020 Presidential election, expect to see more and more ignorant attacks against America, our founding ideals, and western civilization itself. First, one of the biggest lies that the anti-American left perpetrates must be addressed— the idea that America is founded on racism, white supremacy, and slavery. Preview Open

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Washington, the Revolutionary War and Smallpox

 

In honor of George Washington’s actual birthday, I wanted to feature one of his extraordinary actions during the Revolutionary War.

George Washington didn’t need any advice about the deadliness of smallpox. When he was 19 years old when he accompanied his brother ill with tuberculosis to Barbados. They accepted an invitation to dine with a family, some of whom had recovered from smallpox. Although the incubation period was supposedly past, Washington came down with the deadly disease and survived. But the memory of the illness stayed with him.

Quote of the Day: Article Two, Section One, Clause Eight

 

“I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.” — Presidential Oath or Affirmation, United States Constitution

Two-hundred-thirty years ago, on April 30, 1789, those words were spoken in an official capacity for the very first time, as George Washington, the duly elected President of the United States, was sworn into office. There had been a few bumps in his processional route from Mount Vernon to New York, but the swearing-in finally took place on the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street, in front of a large crowd of onlookers. Following the ceremony, Washington went indoors to make his inaugural address to the assembled members of Congress. The day concluded after dark with a few fireworks and cannons.

Such a short time ago. Just 72 years after Washington’s inauguration (in 1861), war broke out between the States. Just 72 years after that (1933), Adolph Hitler was appointed Chancellor of Germany. One-hundred-fifteen years after Washington’s inauguration (1904) and halfway between then and now, Theodore Roosevelt became the first President to win election in his own right after having been elevated to the position upon the death of his predecessor (McKinley). And now, 115 years further down the road, here we are with President Donald J. Trump.

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As they often do, the Left has once again struck its proverbial foot in its mouth. They can’t decide who their enemies are, so they strafe bullets wherever they can. The latest brouhaha is in San Francisco. And they are attacking one of the Founders I admire most: George Washington. Sort of. Preview Open

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are grateful to see Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson rebuke Jussie Smollett for perpetrating a hate crime hoax and damaging the reputation of the city. Johnson also blasted the media for ignoring serious issues while providing wall to wall coverage of Smollett. They’re also horrified by reports of a active duty military officer who plotted to kill many people with bombings, shootings, and outbreaks of disease. And they correct MSNBC hosts Katy Tur and Ari Melber for claiming that George Washington was a “native son of New York”.

Deep Dive on the Declaration of Independence and Its Relevance Today

 

In honor of Independence Day, for this week’s Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten podcast I take a deep dive into the Declaration of Independence, discussing:

  • Its unique place in human history and the cause of freedom
  • The link between natural law and natural rights, faith and freedom
  • The Founders’ emphasis on virtue and morality to sustain a free system of limited government
  • Parallels between the charges laid out against King George III in the Declaration and modern America from the administrative state to sanctuary cities
  • The Founders’ views on slavery, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and failing to live up to the values and principles of the Declaration
  • The imperative to defend liberty against tyranny
  • And much more

You can find the episode on iTunes, everywhere else podcasts are found or download the episode directly here.

David French of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America close the week with three crazy martinis.  They unload on CNN’s Wolf Blitzer and Jim Sciutto for speculating on air that the radical Muslim terrorist in Barcelona got the idea for a van attack from watching the events in Charlottesville.  They also hammer Antifa’s argument that it engages in violence to protect nonviolence and only against white supremacists, pointing out that Antifa viciously attacks anyone it doesn’t agree with and that it is the job of police to protect nonviolence.  And they sigh as liberals start calling for the removal of statues of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, just as their critics predicted earlier in the week.

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April 30, 1789 – The first constitutional president of the United States delivered his inaugural address.  Quoted at length, nothing further that I can add: Among the vicissitudes incident to life, no event could have filled me with greater anxieties than that of which the notification was transmitted by your order, and received on the […]

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Today is George Washington’s  Birthday.  Although we celebrate President’s Day, I have always felt if we were going to honor a few singular presidents then George Washington certainly deserves it.  I have an 8  year old son and recently we were talking about presidents and I made a point, as I do every time the […]

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Bring Back the Cherry Tree

 

Today is President’s Day. In the wake of November’s election, the nation’s capital is busting apart at the seams as both parties strive for dominance and relevance. Each party wants to show that it has heard the will of the people.

If Congress wants to do something really important, it could do worse than bring back Washington’s and Lincoln’s Birthdays as national holidays.

I feel so sad for today’s kids. Nowadays, The 12th and 22nd of February are just two more days in a quirky month known mostly for Valentine’s and Leap Year.