Tag: George III

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Lichtenberg on Truth and Satire

 

“Truth comes from the mouths of fools and children: I wish every good mind which feels an inclination for satire would reflect that the finest satirist always has something of both in him.” — Georg Christoph Lichtenberg

Lichtenberg was an eighteenth-century scientist who spent most of his life in the Holy Roman Empire. He was born in Hesse-Darmstadt. When he was about twenty-one, he was granted tuition from his local ruler to go to the nearby University of Göttingen, which was in the Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg, one of the domains of George III. (The king/elector sent several of his sons to study at the University of Göttingen.) Lichtenberg spent the rest of his life there as student and professor with the exception of a couple of trips to England (one of George III’s other domains). He is probably best remembered today due to Lichtenberg figures, traces of paths left by electricity that are named for him. These are often seen in people who have been struck by lightning, for instance.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: On George III, Spectacles, and a Name Writ Large

 

On August 2, 1776, 242 years ago today, the parchment manuscript generally thought of as the original “Declaration of Independence” was signed by most of its 56 final signatories. First in line was the President of the Second Continental Congress, one John Hancock, who signed his name larger than anyone else, and, after doing so, is reputed to have proclaimed our quote of the day, something very similar to: “There! King George and his ministry can read that without spectacles! They can double the price on my head now.”

In fact, these men were not signing the original Declaration of Independence. That one, known as the “fair copy,” was assembled by Thomas Jefferson from earlier drafts, and it was signed by John Hancock alone, on July 4, 1776. It was sent off so copies could be printed, and then lost, perhaps in the printing process itself. Subsequently, approximately 200 broadside copies of the Declaration were printed, with Hancock’s name included in printed form only.

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When we examine the annals of the World from the beginning of Government unto this day, we find the generality of Nations groaning under the yoke of Despotism; the reason is self evident Man naturally covets an unbounded gratification of his desires, to obtain which he must have sufficient power to force his fellow creatures […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

William went mad the last ten years of his life. It started in 1582, the year his sixth son George was born. His wife stuck with him for another two years, including having two more children by him, but finally she took the children and went into hiding from Mad William. So, George grew up […]

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