Tag: Generations

Member Post

 

Yesterday I was feeling especially like a grumpy old man and I got to thinking about my generation and what we accomplished. We went to the moon, we invented the Internet, we made the personal PC possible and marketed the hell out of it. We built tech giants and Walmart. We ended the cold war […]

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Stop Blaming the Boomers

 

shutterstock_220913251Blaming the Baby Boomers is a popular pastime among Millennials nowadays. Apparently, the problems of our present day are mostly their fault. They allowed government to grow and metastasize, and saddled us with loads of debt. They bought into crazy-lazy theories about overpopulation, and didn’t have enough children. They soaked up all the perks of the Reagan years and left their kids jobless with expensive, worthless degrees.

Now they’re planning to collect billions in pensions and Social Security and Medicare, and younger generations will work themselves to the bone to pay for it, while their retired parents (along with non-parent peers who spent all their own earnings on themselves, and are now helping themselves to ours) enjoy shuffleboard and vacations to the South of France. And then we’ll probably just lie down and die of treatable diseases in our broken-down, two-bit apartments. By that time, you see, the coffers will be emptier than empty, and death will be the only thing we can still afford. Dang Boomers.

I’m being dramatic of course, but I confess that I am not immune to anti-Boomer angst. We’ve all been privy to those conversations when an older relative (perhaps freshly returned from a Caribbean cruise) complains about the medical procedure that Medicare won’t fully cover even though they need it. The griping about how Social Security or pensions are too small. It’s hard to resist unleashing a torrent of indignation on such people. Do they really not see how entitled they are?

A Personal Letter to Boomers

 

shutterstock_119598559Over in the post about Presidential politics and boomer animosity, things began to focus more on the animosity and less on the politics. The more I thought about it, the more I realized I hadn’t ever put into words what I think as a borderline Gen X/Millennial.

I think I should first say that — at least for me — there isn’t an active animosity towards Boomers. That is to say, when I read news about Social Security or welfare programs, I don’t immediately think to myself, “Those [expletive] Boomers!” The greatest man I’ve known personally was a Boomer and — like others here of that generation — he hated the welfare state and everything that came with it. In defense of such folks, there really wasn’t much they personally could have done about it any more than there’s anything personally we can do about ObamaCare or Executive amnesty (the former of which our generation will likely be blamed for).

That being said, the deeper I get into a conversation about what’s going to happen, why it’s going to happen, and how it began to be, the more I begin to resent the Boomer generation in that moment. Not the individuals, but the generation as a group. It’s disheartening to look at my tax returns each year at how much we pay in that could be used for student loans, to invest in retirement, adopt kids, or whatever else, knowing full-well that both my taxes and the national debt are only going to continue to rise forever.

Member Post

 

I was talking today with someone who works for a major oil corporation here in Houston. She was telling me that her company recently invited many of its employees to a presentation in which differences between generations were discussed. The generations identified in the study were Matures (65+), Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millenials (sometimes […]

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