Tag: Free Markets

On today’s episode of American Wonk, Avik Roy talks to Congressman Jim Banks of Indiana, Chairman of the Republican Study Committee and author of a pathbreaking health care reform bill called the Hospital Competition Act. Should the GOP shed its big business reputation to help kitchen table voters?

More on the Hospital Competition Act here.

Free-Market Donald

 

Donald Trump was the most free-market-oriented president we’ve had since Ronald Reagan, and the economy showed it. Probably because of his rhetoric, many people don’t know about the Donald’s free-market proclivities. The people that don’t know about it seem to fall into two major categories:

  1. Ardent Trump supporters.
  2. Ardent Trump haters.

Protectionism prevents President Trump from being a free-market purist, but he was more marketed oriented than his four predecessors. Some, though not all, of that protectionism was justified for strategic and moral reasons.

It was the free-market side of his policies that made the economy roar. Rich, poor, corporations, workers, and people of all races benefitted. Not to mention all 37 genders. Of course, the Left will reverse it all in the name of Compassion.

On this episode of “The Federalist Radio Hour,” Independent Women’s Forum Senior Policy Analyst Inez Feltscher Stepman joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss the GOP’s approach to pro-family policies and how the free market can be useful in creating effective solutions that help Americans.

 

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, author and film director Chris Fenton joined Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss the damaged relationship between the Chinese Communist Party and the United States based off his experience distributing major Hollywood films in China. Fenton’s newest book, “Feeding The Dragon,” was released on Tuesday.

Fenton explained the false impression he and so many others in Hollywood and in American companies broadly believed that globalism was an intrinsically good thing. Due to the hope of increased revenue and the American influence pervading Chinese culture, Fenton said so many Americans overlooked the theft and other crime that would be developed.

In the latest episode, the Young Americans get super nerdy, with the help of real-life tech policy researcher Caleb Watney of the R Street Institute. He and Jack discuss the virtues of free markets vs. Millennial skepticism thereof, question the emerging conventional wisdom on tech addiction and Silicon Valley, rebut the Unabomber (!), and go full nerd with semi-related digressions about Blade RunnerThe Matrix, and, of course, Dune.

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A retake on a Christmas classic, A Capitalist Christmas Carol tells the tale of a socialist curmudgeon named Bernie Sanders. Bernie is a Democratic senator from Vermont, whose whole governing philosophy is to gut the rich and resist the free market. Through the visits of three Spirits, he evolves into a kind, liberty-loving free-marketer.  https://anchor.fm/statesponsoredprogramming/episodes/A-Capitalist-Christmas-Carol–Ep–10-e2rmbm […]

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Net Neutrality Gave Us Shadow Banning

 

Where are the liberal free speech advocates? Conservative thought is being silenced. Silicon Valley’s powerful programmers are hiding voices with which they politically disagree by using statist-like media restrictions not dissimilar from North Korea. Kim Jong Un approves. Just this week we saw two new examples:

Project Veritas latest investigation demonstrates Twitter’s shadow banning of conservative accounts:

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I’ve convinced a liberal friend of mine to meet next week to talk about my view of economics. This comes after he ended a Facebook post on the Senate tax legislation with the rhetorical question “Why would you vote for someone who votes for Supply-Side bull…?”    Preview Open

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Richard Epstein reacts to the tax plan released by congressional Republicans and explains what steps are most essential for jumpstarting economic growth.

Richard Epstein traces the origins and evolution of his libertarian thinking over a half-century in the spotlight.

Richard Epstein looks at the policy changes that would most effectively cure what ails American health care — and responds to progressives calling for the adoption of a single-payer system.

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I’d like to reconcile two different phenomena that I have struggled to understand, one throughout my life and another more recent. I’ve never been a fan of professional sports. I’m about three and a half feet too short to be of much use on a basketball court, and wasn’t part of that crucial culture of […]

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Make America Safe Again, Free-Market-Style

 

Hundreds of passengers wait in the TSA security line at Nashville International Airport. (James R. Martin / Shutterstock, Inc.)

“Why do you always say that we have failed miserably when it comes to handling terror threats?” The question was offered in a less-than-sober setting by an adjunct professor in political science, and even though all in attendance were at varying stages of drunkenness, my reply was sober. “United and American Airlines are still in business.”

Victor Davis Hanson examines the early initiatives coming out of the Trump Administration and reflects on whether the new president’s momentum is sustainable over the long run.

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It seems people don’t respond well to having their options reduced. Imagine that. But CEO Bob Merritt tells investors that “customers and staff spoke very loudly,” and that “a lot of them voted with their feet.” Customer research apparently showed that nearly 60 percent of patrons disliked the tipless model, which increased menu prices by 12 to 15 […]

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After We Kill Free Trade, Are We Next Going to Smash the Machines?

 

pethokoukis_04042016-e1459784418581There has been plenty of upside for America from more free and open trade. A new Economist piece cites many of them: For consumers, lots of things — including clothes and home furnishings — cost the same as they did 30 years ago. Overall, China trade specifically boosts spending power by $250 a year for the average American, with lower-incomers benefiting more. Offshoring and outsourcing low-wage assembly have also boosted the productivity and wages of high-skill workers, with the design (right here) and manufacturing (over there) of many Apple products being the classic example.

But there have been downsides, too. New research finds that some American communities whose manufacturing jobs moved to Asia never really recovered. Jobless rates stayed high, worker earnings depressed. Many displaced workers never moved or found work in less-trade affected sectors as economic models had predicted. They just got stuck. But if you listen to some presidential candidates, you would think that trade has been the primary driver of the decades-long decline in manufacturing employment. If they are right, then reversing course might bring jobs back. But that economic assumption appears wrong. From The Economist:

The sharp decline in American manufacturing employment began in 2000, just as Chinese imports took off. Yet on the extreme assumption that every dollar spent on imports replaced a dollar spent employing an American, Mr Lawrence calculates that between 2000 and 2007 Chinese imports caused, at most, 188,000 of 484,000 annual manufacturing-job losses. A recent, more detailed, estimate by Daron Acemoglu, David Autor and others chalks up about 1m of 5.5m manufacturing jobs lost between 1999 and 2011 to Chinese competition (with similar-sized job losses in other industries).

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From the Against Crony Capitalism blog.  (Highly recommended, by the way.  I wish the Ricochet Establishment could get Nicolas Sorentino to write for Ricochet.  On his blog he mostly just posts things from elsewhere, but sometimes he writes an article of his own.) Today, people living in Bucharest, Romania have access to much faster Internet […]

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From ETWN News:  [….] Last month, a new federal law was enacted to prohibit importation of goods made with forced labor into the U.S., a big boost in the fight against labor trafficking.Since the 1930 Tariff Act, which prohibited such importation, one clause exempted this prohibition for when “consumptive demand” required such goods be imported. […]

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