Tag: fracking

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss how the final debate was much more pleasant to watch and far more substantive than the first one. They also dissect Joe Biden’s many lies in the debate – from saying he never promised to ban fracking to suggesting that the Hunter Biden laptop story is just Russian disinformation to inexplicably contending no one lost their private health insurance plans because of Obamacare. And they appreciate many lefties revealing just how little they know about immigration policy by misunderstanding and mocking Trump’s reference to “coyotes” smuggling kids across the border.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer Mike Pence for a solid debate and putting Kamala Harris on defense over court packing, the economy, the Green New Deal, fracking and more. They also discuss how Harris once again showed she is overrated as a debater and how the media tried to change the discussion after the debate to how Harris was somehow at a disadvantage because she’s a woman. And they serve up a double shot of crazy as the Commission on Presidential Debates announces next week’s debate will be virtual and President Trump immediately rejects the idea.

Join Jim and Greg as they chronicle how Princeton University’s self-flagellation over systemic racism launched a federal investigation into whether they should no longer qualify for taxpayer dollars. They also cringe as two swing states (and, yes, Nevada is one of them) create mail-in voting loopholes that erode confidence in the system. And they hammer Joe Biden for claiming to be for and against fracking in the same answer.

Join Jim and Greg as they serve up three martinis, including one bad one they think could end up being good. They discuss unions planning walkouts from teachers, truckers, government employees and others to demand things like Medicare for all, free rent, and defunding the police – but see tremendous potential for this tactic to backfire spectacularly. They also unload on Kamala Harris for reversing her position on fracking and noting her blatant pandering to Pennsylvania voters in the process. And they vent in reaction to a California wildfire starting from a pyrotechnic explosion at a gender-reveal party.

Join Jim and Greg as they serve up three crazy martinis! First, Jim explains why it’s so weird for Joe Biden to have no public events today and to continue the basement campaign just two months before the election. They also explain why Biden’s recent insistence that he will not ban fracking runs contrary to his repeated promises during the primary season to stop fracking and even shut down fossil fuels entirely. And they welcome a new cable news channel that claims to be focused on facts and not opinion but they also explain the challenges of keeping that promise.

Mark Mills joins Brian Anderson to discuss the enormous energy demands of the world’s modern information infrastructure—“the Cloud”—the subject of his new book, Digital Cathedrals.

“Tech companies confront an inconvenient fact,” writes Mills. “The global cloud uses more energy than is produced by all the planet’s wind and solar farms combined.” In fact, digital traffic has become the fastest-growing source of energy use. While nearly every tech company has pledged to transition to renewable energy sources, most data centers are physically connected to the conventional power grid, fueled by hydrocarbons. The modern economy won’t be exclusively powered by renewables any time soon.

Member Post

 

I don’t know how various bills get voted on in the Senate, but if Sanders actually did introduce this bill shouldn’t McConnell allow a vote on it? Make the Dems say yay or nay to fracking for all to see and thus ensure a PA win for the Trumpster. Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday. Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Our own @exjon has an article in USA Today this morning that exposes in great detail the hypocritical divide among the world’s elites between Climate Change Rhetoric and Climate Change Action: The U.S. may not ‘believe’ in climate change. But we’re the only one doing something about it Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Richard Epstein looks at Donald Trump’s recent executive orders on energy and environmental issues, explaining how free-market economics can be reconciled with good environmental stewardship.

​City Journal associate editor Matthew Hennessey and Manhattan Institute senior fellow Robert Bryce discuss the possibilities for the domestic energy industry under Trump, the state of American nuclear power, the Left’s push for all-renewable energy, and more.

City Journal is a magazine of urban affairs, published by the Manhattan Institute.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

  I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Sunday. When it appears, I post the previous week’s review on Ricochet.  Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Today’s WSJ has an editorial about Hillary Clinton and energy, claiming she keeps following Bernie Sanders further to the left. How did she do this? It turns out that it’s by moving to the right and supporting federalism. OK, OK, it’s just a temporary feint to the right, but her rightward move is exactly my […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. How Green Was My Fracking

 

turbine_county_fracking_county_scrIn The Telegraph, Christopher Booker points out that being Green means you are willfully murdering wildlife:

When Professor David MacKay stepped down as chief scientific adviser to the Department of Energy and Climate Change (Decc) last year, he produced a report comparing the environmental impact of a fracking site to that of wind farms. Over 25 years, he calculated, a single “shale gas pad” covering five acres, with a drilling rig 85ft high (only needed for less than a year), would produce as much energy as 87 giant wind turbines, covering 5.6 square miles and visible up to 20 miles away. Yet, to the greenies, the first of these, capable of producing energy whenever needed, without a penny of subsidy, is anathema; while the second, producing electricity very unreliably in return for millions of pounds in subsidies, fills them with rapture.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Geopolitical Shocks from Fracking

 

Hydro-Fracking-FieldTechnology is great — we all know that. It has given us longer and far more comfortable lives, and enormous increases in wealth of all kinds. Nevertheless, we often make arguments about geopolitics as if we were in a technological stasis field. This is a mistake, because, of course, technological changes lead to unintended consequences that can change everything.

I am speaking specifically not about incremental technological changes (like better cars or air conditioning), but about disruptive changes — the kinds of things that lead to changes that the inventors never imagined.

One of my recent hobby horses is fracking. People think that it is about cheap energy, which it is. And they think it is an environmental nightmare, which is not so. Fracking in the U.S. has brought down (and will hold down) energy prices. But the geopolitical implications are staggering — and broadly unrecognized.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Strategika Podcast: Kori Schake on the Mixed Blessings of Energy Abundance

 

Schake current hi-resThe energy boom has been great for the United States. But in other parts of the world? Not so much. In this final installment of the Strategika series on the international implications of new energy development, I talk with the Hoover Institution’s Kori Schake about the fallout for nations that have traditionally relied on energy resources to prop up their governments. Are places like Venezuela and Russia heading for dramatic upheavals thanks to changes in global markets? Should growing American energy production cause us to rethink our role in the Middle East? Are natural resources just as much a curse as a blessing? You can hear the answers below or by subscribing to the Strategika podcast through iTunes or your favorite podcast player.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Strategika Podcast: Williamson Murray on the Strategic Implications of America’s Energy Boom

 

WickIn the new series of Strategika podcasts from the Hoover Institution, we’re looking at what the revolution in American energy production means for the US’s economic and strategic future. In this first installment, I talk with Williamson Murray, the Ambassador Anthony D. Marshall Chair of Strategic Studies at The Marine Corps University, about what the implications are for our relationships with Russia, Iran, and other countries in the Middle East. Listen in below or subscribe to Strategika through iTunes or your favorite podcast service.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. The Critical Minority That Makes Us Great

 

shutterstock_94254988After a career in very large business ranging from big industrial work to Silicon Valley madness, I settled down in my second half of life — it used to be called “retirement” — to work with small businesses. After 10 years of advising, coaching, and salvaging many entrepreneurs I’ve come to two conclusions: 1) Starting and keeping a small business healthy is a crucible of pain and challenge to which few are suited; and 2) The large institutions of government, labor, and finance are antithetical to small business existence.

Despite these dire observations, the resilience of America has always been led by the critical few who move outside the established framework and go somewhere new. We once celebrated pioneers —not the famous ones, but the unnamed ones who slogged the Oregon Trail, farmed the plains, or dealt with the Dust Bowl. We saw an untamed, wide-open frontier called the Internet change our everyday lives, driven by thousands of individuals with the drive to try something new.

America provided the freedom to try. It allowed you to fail or prosper.

Member Post

 

Thanks to fracking… The gas and oil boom of the upper plains states is expanding. (They are even prospecting for oil here in my own NH). Even with a government and intelligentsia actively opposed to gas and oil, the can-do spirit of the private businesses of America are overcoming the technological and regulatory hurdles to power […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Too funny to not share, this is a great pro-fracking commercial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfNzW9YY8QE   Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.