Tag: Food

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I promised a little while ago that I would be writing about my recent travels, and since I’ve already done a piece on London and Paris last summer, I thought some readers might like a Saturday night sojourn to Rome.  This trip did not begin in the most auspicious of ways. While it was a […]

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May Merriment: Three Slices of Happiness

 

On the way to more serious content, I ran across three very different but equally, quietly, joyful YouTube videos. Enjoy three great slices of Americana:

  •  A woman making cheeseburger pie, with camera work by her husband of many years.
  • A woman and her heavy Chevy.
  • The ice cream man and the truly diverse community he serves.

The cooking video is one of a series, shot in a couple’s kitchen. To be completely accurate, it is clearly the woman’s kitchen, and her husband is there in support and in appreciation of her cooking. How could you not like Mae Mae’s Happy Table? You will surely gain five pounds just watching, but the video is worth the weight.

The Food Supply Chain is NOT “Breaking”

 

It was disappointing to read the ad in The New York Times & Washington Post today from Tyson Food’s CEO that “the food supply chain is breaking.” The media of course ran with that (and not much else), consistent with its own obvious strategy to spread fear. Tyson and a few other companies have had serious issues with Wuhan Virus victims, and some plants – some 30 in total, if what I read is correct, have had to close temporarily. Other plants have had partial shutdowns. But as a food industry veteran of 23 years, let me assure you – our food supply chain, while stressed, is NOT breaking.

Oh, sure, some are more stressed than others, some pretty severely, especially if ingredients or products from China are in your supply chain. If you are part of the “foodservice” supply chain, you’re really stressed.

I Want to Go to a Restaurant

 

I want to go to a restaurant.
I want to wait to be seated.
I want the hostess to ask me if this table is alright.
I want to take a long, deep sip from the water glass, a water glass that is full of ice and has droplets of water running down the side like glacial meltwater.
I want to examine the appetizer list like I’m choosing a college major.
I want to know what the soup of the day is.
I want the server to tell me about the specials. I want them to ask me what sides I want with my meal.
I want to hear the muted clang of the silverware as it rolls out of the napkin, then revel in anticipation as I tuck the napkin into my lap.
I want to savor each bite of my food, knowing that someone was paid good money to make it come out just right.
I want the server to offer me dessert. I want to decline their offer because I am just too full.
I want to sip a cup of coffee as the taste of the meal I just ate lingers in my mouth.
I want to tip my server for providing me this wonderful experience.
I want to smile politely to the hostess as I leave and thank them for an excellent meal.
I want to go back to a restaurant, and I want to go back soon.

Member Post

 

On another topic we strayed into speculation about how liberals may not have forseen or orchestrated the virus but are now having wishful thinking of an expanded Bernie influence, to make the virus carry that load of unexplained socialist “inevitability” we would normally see past and resist. Well is time of the essence? Today Rush […]

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Today I turned to the sunny side. Get a mask, or make one, we are told. So my mind went down two paths at once: looking up good DIY sewing tutorials on making your own mask (I can do basic machine sewing) and making lemon basil marmalade. Naturally. Quick research on DIY masks suggests that, […]

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Panicky Grocery Shoppers Rediscover Canned Foods – That’s Good!

 

Rich Zeoli is a popular morning radio talk show host in Philadelphia. On Saturday morning, he tweeted out a photo of nearly empty canned soup shelves at his southern New Jersey grocery store. It was something I thought I’d never see again – depleted soup shelves.

Amidst the fears that were spread this week about Coronavirus (COVID-19), including governments shutting down schools, public parks, and demands for the closure of “non-essential” businesses – even state-owned liquor stores here in Pennsylvania — Americans flooded neighborhood retail food shops to stockpile whatever would fit in their grocery carts. The dusty, sometimes-forgotten “center store,” where the shelf-stable “processed” foods have sometimes languished was rediscovered.

And it’s about time.

Green Vegetables and a Groaning Table

 

Mulling over food color themes from Red, White, and Blue Labor Day U.S.A. and Colorful Cooking, a family food memory came front of mind. The tale has long been told of an important family dinner. It was one of those occasions when the prospective new family member meets the prospective parents-in-law. One of my aunts had come to my maternal grandparents’ home, and was seated at the family table when it happened.

All heads were bowed as my grandfather completed the prayer of thanksgiving and blessing over the meal. Suddenly my aunt heard a loud gasp from her mother-in-law-to-be. My aunt thought “Oh no, I’ve just met her and she’s having a heart attack!” Then she heard my grandmother exclaim in dismay: “There’s no green vegetable!

Mind you, there were surely at least two breads: a nut or cranberry bread and dinner rolls, but “there’s no green vegetable!

Quote of the Day: Vegetarian Philosophy

 

“But here’s my question. Why do the companies that sell ‘not meat’ — Frankenfoods made from plant cells and/or vegetable cocktails — spend millions of dollars to make it look exactly like meat? Wouldn’t that be a contradiction in vegetarian philosophy? ‘I’ve decided to chew leaves the rest of my life, but I want all the leaves to look like hot dogs.'” – Joe Bob Briggs

I am a vegan this week – and next. Voluntarily, although I hate it. Why? Because I believe God expects it from me. I am an Orthodox Christian. As @skipsul can explain, Orthodox are in the middle of the two-week Dormition Fast, observing the death of Mary, mother of Jesus. It is one of four fast periods for the devout Orthodox observer, where we forgo meat and dairy (and usually fish).

Group Writing: Sometimes, You Should Eat All the Butter

 

Ripe mangoes in combination with grilled sun-dried salted fish is one of the most popular Khmer dishes served when the weather is heating up. That is because we consider mangoes and fish as cool food. According to Khmer traditional medicine, an offshoot of Indian ayurvedic, food is divided into two groups, warm and cool. Warm or cool in terms of the food’s internal characteristics, not its physical temperature. When we eat warm food, it has a heating effect on our bodies, while cool food adds a cooling effect. So, when the temperature is heating up, we eat cool food to cool us down. 

 

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The first time I took the train to Paris, the city was a pale, miserable gray, 32 degrees and raining. I had lost my gloves two days before. It took me an hour, pulling a suitcase with a month’s worth of clothes and Christmas presents for my direct return to Boston via CDG, to reach […]

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While I read When I Whistle by Shusaku Endo this week, I thought I would go in a slightly different direction from reviewing the book. (I also just sat my last, three hour paper of the term and feel rather…interesting). When I Whistle is about memories, about growing into adulthood, and learning how to live […]

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We host potluck get-togethers on our deck several times each year. These are intended as community building exercises, designed to promote interactions between and with people of divergent ages and viewpoints. I make it plain that all opinions on all subjects are encouraged, with decorum. That means, mostly, no personal attacks and if women and […]

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Of Peonies and Mongolian Beef

 

When my wife and I were first dating, she asked me, “What are you passionate about?” Since I didn’t know Jesus at the time, and I was smart enough not to say football, I answered as all men should if we are truthful about it.

“Food,” I said.

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This is a tale of unexpected gifts of grub, indeed tasty treats, while in the field on military duty. Each is an unexpected relief from planned, forecast, resourced Army chow. None of these, well almost none, were going to win any awards, but they were gifts of sweet relief from the grind of standard Army […]

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Group Writing: How to Prepare Kampot Noodles

 

Did you know that noodles originated in Cambodia? Well, according to the Khmer legend of Dhmen Jay, noodles were introduced to China around the start of the Common Era. If you’ve read my previous post on noodles, you’d know that num banh chok is a fermented rice noodles. Making num banh chok is very laborious, as you can probably tell from that post.

I’m not certain of the age and provenance of num banh chok, but my aunt’s third-grade teacher’s family claimed to have been making Khmer noodles for more than a thousand years. And there are many villages all over Cambodia that have claimed the same. There are a few areas in Kampong Thom and Kratié provinces that have been making num banh chok for more than two millennia.

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This post was inspired by a @midge comment on a penetrating and erudite @fredcole Food Storage Container post.  – and brought to you by  RICOCHET™ Home of Center-Right Domestic Discussion.  The comment in question, “Robbing others of what little joy they do get out of doing housework is a time-tested strategy for getting to do all the housework yourself,” reminded me […]

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