Tag: Food

Green Vegetables and a Groaning Table

 

Mulling over food color themes from Red, White, and Blue Labor Day U.S.A. and Colorful Cooking, a family food memory came front of mind. The tale has long been told of an important family dinner. It was one of those occasions when the prospective new family member meets the prospective parents-in-law. One of my aunts had come to my maternal grandparents’ home, and was seated at the family table when it happened.

All heads were bowed as my grandfather completed the prayer of thanksgiving and blessing over the meal. Suddenly my aunt heard a loud gasp from her mother-in-law-to-be. My aunt thought “Oh no, I’ve just met her and she’s having a heart attack!” Then she heard my grandmother exclaim in dismay: “There’s no green vegetable!

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Quote of the Day: Vegetarian Philosophy

 

“But here’s my question. Why do the companies that sell ‘not meat’ — Frankenfoods made from plant cells and/or vegetable cocktails — spend millions of dollars to make it look exactly like meat? Wouldn’t that be a contradiction in vegetarian philosophy? ‘I’ve decided to chew leaves the rest of my life, but I want all the leaves to look like hot dogs.'” – Joe Bob Briggs

I am a vegan this week – and next. Voluntarily, although I hate it. Why? Because I believe God expects it from me. I am an Orthodox Christian. As @skipsul can explain, Orthodox are in the middle of the two-week Dormition Fast, observing the death of Mary, mother of Jesus. It is one of four fast periods for the devout Orthodox observer, where we forgo meat and dairy (and usually fish).

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Group Writing: Sometimes, You Should Eat All the Butter

 

Ripe mangoes in combination with grilled sun-dried salted fish is one of the most popular Khmer dishes served when the weather is heating up. That is because we consider mangoes and fish as cool food. According to Khmer traditional medicine, an offshoot of Indian ayurvedic, food is divided into two groups, warm and cool. Warm or cool in terms of the food’s internal characteristics, not its physical temperature. When we eat warm food, it has a heating effect on our bodies, while cool food adds a cooling effect. So, when the temperature is heating up, we eat cool food to cool us down. 

 

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Member Post

 

The first time I took the train to Paris, the city was a pale, miserable gray, 32 degrees and raining. I had lost my gloves two days before. It took me an hour, pulling a suitcase with a month’s worth of clothes and Christmas presents for my direct return to Boston via CDG, to reach […]

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Member Post

 

While I read When I Whistle by Shusaku Endo this week, I thought I would go in a slightly different direction from reviewing the book. (I also just sat my last, three hour paper of the term and feel rather…interesting). When I Whistle is about memories, about growing into adulthood, and learning how to live […]

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Member Post

 

We host potluck get-togethers on our deck several times each year. These are intended as community building exercises, designed to promote interactions between and with people of divergent ages and viewpoints. I make it plain that all opinions on all subjects are encouraged, with decorum. That means, mostly, no personal attacks and if women and […]

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Of Peonies and Mongolian Beef

 

When my wife and I were first dating, she asked me, “What are you passionate about?” Since I didn’t know Jesus at the time, and I was smart enough not to say football, I answered as all men should if we are truthful about it.

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Member Post

 

This is a tale of unexpected gifts of grub, indeed tasty treats, while in the field on military duty. Each is an unexpected relief from planned, forecast, resourced Army chow. None of these, well almost none, were going to win any awards, but they were gifts of sweet relief from the grind of standard Army […]

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Group Writing: How to Prepare Kampot Noodles

 

Did you know that noodles originated in Cambodia? Well, according to the Khmer legend of Dhmen Jay, noodles were introduced to China around the start of the Common Era. If you’ve read my previous post on noodles, you’d know that num banh chok is a fermented rice noodles. Making num banh chok is very laborious, as you can probably tell from that post.

I’m not certain of the age and provenance of num banh chok, but my aunt’s third-grade teacher’s family claimed to have been making Khmer noodles for more than a thousand years. And there are many villages all over Cambodia that have claimed the same. There are a few areas in Kampong Thom and Kratié provinces that have been making num banh chok for more than two millennia.

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Turkey in the Slaw and Other Leftovers

 

What do you do with your Thanksgiving leftovers? I imagine some of you get quite creative.

It’s possible desperation, not creativity, inspired the day’s menu presented below, but for your delectation, I thought I’d share it:

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Member Post

 

This post was inspired by a @midge comment on a penetrating and erudite @fredcole Food Storage Container post.  – and brought to you by RICOCHET™ Home of Center-Right Domestic Discussion.  The comment in question, “Robbing others of what little joy they do get out of doing housework is a time-tested strategy for getting to do all the housework yourself,” reminded me of […]

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There’s No Accounting for Taste

 

Why do people put Clamato® in their Budweiser®?
It makes the beer taste better and it’s cheaper than motor oil.

Several years ago, a cartoonist devoted several strips to the rather odd project of attacking Clamato® juice. In a fairly heated discussion on Comics I Don’t Understand (My Ricochet at the time), I pointed out that making fun of food choices can be a sneaky way to denigrate racial and ethnic groups. One of the cartoons even shows the inventor of Clamato® as Hispanic and saying (in Spanish) “…This is repugnant. We’re going to be rich.”

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A Deadly Cake

 
By Hyzuko from Wikimedia Commons

Do you like desserts? In Cambodia, desserts are eaten in large quantities as snacks at any time of the day, whether it’s 8 AM or 10 PM. We don’t serve desserts as a course after each meal. Instead, we eat fresh fruit after a meal, unless it’s a big celebration or a wedding. Cambodian desserts range from cakes to puddings, dumplings to custards. The Khmer word for dessert is bangaem, meaning sweet. However, Cambodian desserts are not quite as sweet as western desserts. Khmer cuisine, as a whole, is not as sweet as those of our surrounding neighbors.

Today, I’m introducing you to one simple Cambodian cake, which is made from three simple ingredients you can easily find in your local supermarket. This cake is very old, one of the oldest Cambodian desserts. And it goes by many names, one of which is the famous or infamous, depending on how you look at it: The cake that kills the husband. We’ll get to that name in a bit.

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Deep-Dish Gluten-Free Pizza Florentine Alfredo

 

Description

For those who want to live forever and achieve heaven on earth, God created all the ingredients for Pizza Florentine Alfredo. Now, to make your life complete, I shall teach you how to combine them to create a masterpiece you will never forget. As with any pizza, it has a crust, sauce, cheese, and toppings. This particular recipe will provide ingredients and instructions for gluten-free crusts, because the author of the recipe cannot eat any other kind. The primary toppings of this pizza are fresh baby spinach leaves, slivered or sliced almonds, and bacon because that’s what God intended those ingredients for is to be combined on a pizza.

This recipe is made in a 14” non-stick deep-dish pizza pan. If your pan is smaller, you might consider cutting the recipe. If your pan is larger, how do you fit it into your kitchen cabinets?

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Beware of Angry Foodies

 

A day spent in the kitchen is a day well spent. I will never be as great a cook as my Mom was, but I do love to cook, and I manage to do a pretty good job. Even though I have a couple of bookcases full of recipe books, I still like to look at recipes on the internet to see if there is something new, or to get ideas for adding to old recipes. A couple of nights ago a recipe for a carrot, zucchini, and apple cake showed up in my Facebook time line, so I clicked on it.

After reading the recipe, I decided to look at the comments on the post (I should never do that). One gal said, “Just because it has veggies in it doesn’t mean it is good for you. Don’t make this.” And, another gal shrieked, “Flour and sugar will kill you!” (Emphasis added) Wow. I’ll bet the neighborhood potlucks with Debbie Downer and Morticia are a real hoot.

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The World’s First Noodles

 

Noodles originated in Cambodia, or so says the legend of Dhmen Jay, a young man who lived at the start of the Common Era in Nokor Phnom (the first unified Khmer kingdom). Dhmen Jay was born to a couple of no particular power or wealth. As a young boy, he was tricked by a millionaire neighbor and promised to get even. Shortly after, Dhmen Jay easily outsmarted the millionaire, who then proceeded to hoist him on the king. Soon, he was tricking and ridiculing bureaucrats left and right, winning contests of wit and outsmarted the entire court. He even mocked and outsmarted a bunch of wily Chinese emissaries sent by the Chinese emperor.

As his exploits continued to grow, he caused disarray and chaos at the court. So he was banned to the provinces, where he tricked the locals and the executioners, who were supposed to end his exploits. The Chinese came back thinking he had died. Dhmen Jay eventually saved Cambodia from China by answering their riddles.

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Bacon, Disordered Guilt, and Penance Signaling

 

I’ve written earlier about how we’ve been fed a crap sandwich about saturated fat being bad for our heart health. Take one classic and common example, using nearly everyone’s favorite indulgence: bacon.

Bacon, science tell us, is bad. Very, very bad. It’ll clog your arteries. It will kill you. Yet, our hearts break into song when we savor that sizzling and delicious bacon. Are you sure Adam didn’t take his humanity-damning bite from a bacon strip? Apples are good, dontcha know, so says science.

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These Wonderful Scourges of Modern Life

 

I like contrails. Taking walks on clear summer days, when the heavens are deep blue, I love to tip my head back and watch aircraft passing overhead, leaving their long, white traces against the blue expanse. Someone, a pilot, explained to me that it was exhaust, up there so high that it freezes. The exhaust looks like clean, billowing cotton collecting behind the plane. I wonder how many miles of trail I’m seeing, wondering whether my distance from the plane is deceiving my eyes, that a space I could frame with my fingers is actually far longer than it looks from the ground.

I love planes. I like how sometimes you hear their hum before you see them. Their sound is not logical. Then you crane your neck and finally, you spot the tiny machine far off in the sky. It may be toward evening, the sun glinting off the metal. I think about how that craft is full of orderly rows of people, way up there, seats bolted to the floor, who are at this instant talking, reading, watching movies. The plane’s metal belly separates their feet from great heights beneath them and the wooded landscape below where a pair of eyes might be watching their progress.

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Behold the Genius of Vegan Tuna: Whole Foods Trends of 2018

 

Dear eater, are your mushrooms dysfunctional? Do they just lie there on your plate, limply, underperforming? Then we have great news for you! Functional mushrooms are just one of Whole Food’s food trends for 2018. Yes, now your mushrooms can function again!

Well, not your mushrooms. Not the dull, familiar mushrooms you’re used to eating. They’re just edible, not functional – these days, merely functioning as food simply isn’t functioning hard enough. No, we mean mushrooms with names like “reishi, chaga, cordyceps, and lion’s mane”. Which are not a kind of massage, disease, surgical implement, or feline fringe, respectively, though we understand the confusion. Whole Foods explains,

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Looking Back – Economical Cooking

 

Sometime back in April, I asked for tips on how to be a more economical cook. Someone asked if I could do a look-back post and tell you guys how it went.

Our first year practicing a budget was a huge success! We were able to replace a 16-year-old car with a 2017 Honda Civic, financing less than half of the cost. We have also put aside another couple thousand for our kids. We hope to have the car paid off sometime in June or July, which will put us at Dave Ramsey’s Baby Step Six-ish once again.

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