Tag: Food

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Is this to be the last true Labor Day? This year’s elections, formally ending on November 3, will answer the question. The United States is a nation with a deep, rich tradition of honoring honest labor and of workers and workers organizations standing up for their interests and their human dignity. It is not true […]

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Farm subsidies are perhaps the ultimate, but secret, third rail of American politics. While entitlements are discussed out in the open, farm subsidies are rarely talked about – even though they are the most expensive subsidy Washington doles out. Read More View Post

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. “Trump Speed” Week in Review

 

American voters face a choice, not an echo, and need to act accordingly in this election season. As the Democratic National Convention rolls out in some form this week, measure Democrat supporters’ claims against President Trump’s accomplishments. Start with just last week. The Trump administration moved with purpose all week, taking both domestic and international actions that matter. Consider this daily summary of the past week’s events [emphasis, bracketed comments, and links added]. Bear in mind, President Trump had his brother Robert on his heart all week, as Robert was in hospital “having a tough time.” Sadly, the week ended with President Trump saying farewell in person to his beloved younger brother, but that did not stop the president announcing a defense agreement with Poland, to the consternation of Russia and their Democrat true friends. Robert Trump died on August 15, 2020:

It is with heavy heart I share that my wonderful brother, Robert, peacefully passed away tonight. He was not just my brother, he was my best friend. He will be greatly missed, but we will meet again. His memory will live on in my heart forever. Robert, I love you. Rest in peace.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Home Cooking and Concert, 1st Week of July

 

As America heads into a long holiday weekend, however distorted by the great political fight for permanent tyranny or another season of liberty, it is fitting and proper that we should again reflect on our many blessings, including our national heritage. Our basic governing document has only been truly changed, legitimately amended, 27 times in 233 years, with 10 all at once at the very beginning, part of the agreement under which the base document of the Constitution was ratified.

We all profit by Saint Paul’s admonition to the early church at Philippi:

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“What am I, chopped liver?” is an expression of uncertain origin. It seems to arise from a traditional European Jewish side dish. That suggests discounting or overlooking someone, as one might overlook or reach last for a side dish, after the entree. Chopped liver is certainly less prestigious than goose liver foie gras, although likely […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Reuben Bratwurst (or Why my Mouf is ’Appy)

 

A few years back, a little fast food place opened here north of Detroit, Michigan. It was called Loaded Links. Basically, it was a high-end hot-dog and circus food place. They had all sorts of options on the menu. For instance, there was the Millionaire’s Dog, which had a Wagyu steak dog with fois gras and truffle sauce. They also had menu items with names like Windy City Dog or New York-Style, etc. I went through trying all of the variations. My wife had been getting the Reuben Dog with a few small alterations. I believe it normally came with an all-beef hot dog, and she would substitute a Polish sausage, instead. She would also get it without pastrami. Now, I thought pastrami was kind of an odd innovation. Corned beef, yes. Pastrami? Eh. So, I didn’t try the Reuben Dog until we had been there at least ten times. And I was very pleasantly surprised. It was without a doubt the best thing on their menu. A week later, I was jonesing for that Reuben Dog. We headed over there, and…they were closed. They had a note saying that they were moving and would be at a new location in the spring. And then CoViD-19 appeared. Loaded Links has not yet reappeared if it will. And I’ve been jonesing for another Reuben Dog.

Oh, I have had Reubens since then. Given my conditions, they have to be naked, no bread. Likewise, Loaded Links had an option to serve the hot dogs in a gluten-free corn tortilla, which is how I had been eating them there. But those naked Reubens weren’t quite the same.

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In the midst of strife and negativity, it is important to seek out beauty and praiseworthy things. I look forward every week now to what Xuefei Yang and Mae Mae will offer up to the world. This week does not disappoint. Xuefei Yang plays a tradition Chinese piece, the Lantern Song. Read More View Post

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@markcamp‘s excellent post on accidental recipes last week got me thinking about the best unexpected food combinations. I’m sure quarantine, and limited access to grocery stores and food items has made us all a little more creative in our pairings. Certainly, because I cook mostly East Asian and Middle Eastern food at home and at […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. La Dolce Vita: A December Sojourn in Rome

 

I promised a little while ago that I would be writing about my recent travels, and since I’ve already done a piece on London and Paris last summer, I thought some readers might like a Saturday night sojourn to Rome. 

This trip did not begin in the most auspicious of ways. While it was a 6 am flight out of Gatwick, I needed to board a train there from my university city by 1 am in order to leave my luggage in storage, collect my boarding pass, and get through security. And if 1 am train rides, when I hadn’t actually slept, weren’t enough fun, I also got to contend with an incoherent, screaming vagrant boarding at one of the stops jumping straight into my empty carriage. Living in a city for two years teaches you to not blink an eye at things that would shock you in a small town. Screaming Scottish man with a beer belly in a fishnet dress and pumps, carrying a Stella Artois; well, it is Friday. 

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. May Merriment: Three Slices of Happiness

 

On the way to more serious content, I ran across three very different but equally, quietly, joyful YouTube videos. Enjoy three great slices of Americana:

  •  A woman making cheeseburger pie, with camera work by her husband of many years.
  • A woman and her heavy Chevy.
  • The ice cream man and the truly diverse community he serves.

The cooking video is one of a series, shot in a couple’s kitchen. To be completely accurate, it is clearly the woman’s kitchen, and her husband is there in support and in appreciation of her cooking. How could you not like Mae Mae’s Happy Table? You will surely gain five pounds just watching, but the video is worth the weight.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Food Supply Chain is NOT “Breaking”

 

It was disappointing to read the ad in The New York Times & Washington Post today from Tyson Food’s CEO that “the food supply chain is breaking.” The media of course ran with that (and not much else), consistent with its own obvious strategy to spread fear. Tyson and a few other companies have had serious issues with Wuhan Virus victims, and some plants – some 30 in total, if what I read is correct, have had to close temporarily. Other plants have had partial shutdowns. But as a food industry veteran of 23 years, let me assure you – our food supply chain, while stressed, is NOT breaking.

Oh, sure, some are more stressed than others, some pretty severely, especially if ingredients or products from China are in your supply chain. If you are part of the “foodservice” supply chain, you’re really stressed.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. I Want to Go to a Restaurant

 

I want to go to a restaurant.
I want to wait to be seated.
I want the hostess to ask me if this table is alright.
I want to take a long, deep sip from the water glass, a water glass that is full of ice and has droplets of water running down the side like glacial meltwater.
I want to examine the appetizer list like I’m choosing a college major.
I want to know what the soup of the day is.
I want the server to tell me about the specials. I want them to ask me what sides I want with my meal.
I want to hear the muted clang of the silverware as it rolls out of the napkin, then revel in anticipation as I tuck the napkin into my lap.
I want to savor each bite of my food, knowing that someone was paid good money to make it come out just right.
I want the server to offer me dessert. I want to decline their offer because I am just too full.
I want to sip a cup of coffee as the taste of the meal I just ate lingers in my mouth.
I want to tip my server for providing me this wonderful experience.
I want to smile politely to the hostess as I leave and thank them for an excellent meal.
I want to go back to a restaurant, and I want to go back soon.

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On another topic we strayed into speculation about how liberals may not have forseen or orchestrated the virus but are now having wishful thinking of an expanded Bernie influence, to make the virus carry that load of unexplained socialist “inevitability” we would normally see past and resist. Well is time of the essence? Today Rush […]

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Today I turned to the sunny side. Get a mask, or make one, we are told. So my mind went down two paths at once: looking up good DIY sewing tutorials on making your own mask (I can do basic machine sewing) and making lemon basil marmalade. Naturally. Quick research on DIY masks suggests that, […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Panicky Grocery Shoppers Rediscover Canned Foods – That’s Good!

 

Rich Zeoli is a popular morning radio talk show host in Philadelphia. On Saturday morning, he tweeted out a photo of nearly empty canned soup shelves at his southern New Jersey grocery store. It was something I thought I’d never see again – depleted soup shelves.

Amidst the fears that were spread this week about Coronavirus (COVID-19), including governments shutting down schools, public parks, and demands for the closure of “non-essential” businesses – even state-owned liquor stores here in Pennsylvania — Americans flooded neighborhood retail food shops to stockpile whatever would fit in their grocery carts. The dusty, sometimes-forgotten “center store,” where the shelf-stable “processed” foods have sometimes languished was rediscovered.

Post of the Week Created with Sketch. French Court Scrambles the Debate Over What Is “GMO” in Foods

 
GMO plant in a laboratory. Photo credit: shutterstock.com

Science has long been embroiled in food safety and labeling debates. Most recently, you’ve probably read or heard about the decades-long debate on whether to mandate labeling or disclosure that “genetically modified organisms” (GMOs) were used to grow or process certain food products.

Think of the “Arctic Apple” (which doesn’t brown when cut, thanks to a little genetic modification, or the “AquAdvantage Salmon,” which merges genes from two separate salmon varieties (Chinook & Atlantic) for a fish that grows faster and bigger (and they’re all female, supposedly). Neither of these products, despite being in development for the better part of two decades is just now, slowly, making their way into retail markets (but not Whole Foods, I assure you).

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Green Vegetables and a Groaning Table

 

Mulling over food color themes from Red, White, and Blue Labor Day U.S.A. and Colorful Cooking, a family food memory came front of mind. The tale has long been told of an important family dinner. It was one of those occasions when the prospective new family member meets the prospective parents-in-law. One of my aunts had come to my maternal grandparents’ home, and was seated at the family table when it happened.

All heads were bowed as my grandfather completed the prayer of thanksgiving and blessing over the meal. Suddenly my aunt heard a loud gasp from her mother-in-law-to-be. My aunt thought “Oh no, I’ve just met her and she’s having a heart attack!” Then she heard my grandmother exclaim in dismay: “There’s no green vegetable!

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Vegetarian Philosophy

 

“But here’s my question. Why do the companies that sell ‘not meat’ — Frankenfoods made from plant cells and/or vegetable cocktails — spend millions of dollars to make it look exactly like meat? Wouldn’t that be a contradiction in vegetarian philosophy? ‘I’ve decided to chew leaves the rest of my life, but I want all the leaves to look like hot dogs.'” – Joe Bob Briggs

I am a vegan this week – and next. Voluntarily, although I hate it. Why? Because I believe God expects it from me. I am an Orthodox Christian. As @skipsul can explain, Orthodox are in the middle of the two-week Dormition Fast, observing the death of Mary, mother of Jesus. It is one of four fast periods for the devout Orthodox observer, where we forgo meat and dairy (and usually fish).