Tag: Food

Member Post

 

To the average person, my life probably seems mundane and repetitious. Most days are filled with similar activities and events, and at first glance, they may seem ordinary, even boring. But somehow, at this time in my life, I have found myself singularly engaged in most hours that fill my day, in a way that […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

What Do Electric Vehicles and Eating Insects Have in Common?

 

Channeling his inner Marie Antoinette and demonstrating an example of the Biden Administration’s unparalleled tone-deafness a few weeks ago, US Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg has simple advice for combatting higher gasoline prices: Buy an electric car.

At least he hasn’t advised us to eat more insects yet. But it may be only a matter of time. The same interests and climate cultists pushing EVs also encourage you to eat bugs. Behind all this is a punitive and bizarre economic and cultural agenda. More sustainable for the planet, they claim, as they move us towards a “net zero emissions economy” by 2050. If not sooner. More about that later.

Member Post

 

Part I can be found here. Books and movies have forever influenced culture. But some have had an outsized influence on public policy and laws. Rachel Carson’s 1962 “Silent Spring” influenced the John F. Kennedy Administration and future regulators to curb or eventually ban the use of chemical insecticides like DDT. The movie “One Flew […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

A Science-Fiction Cookout

 

Food: it is a central part of our lives. It is surprising how relatively little fantasy and science fiction centers upon food. F&SF explores the human condition, extrapolating the present into alternate realities. Why not explore food?

“Eat, Drink, and Be Wary: Satisfying Stories with a Delicious Twist,” edited by Lisa Magnum, takes on that challenge. It is a collection of nineteen fantasy and science fiction stories, with food as a theme.

The nineteen contributors go many different directions with their stories. This book contains hard science fiction, classic fantasy, and just about everything in between, including a variety of genres. There is an old-fashioned murder mystery, a noir adventure, classic horror, post-apocalyptic tales, and urban fantasy. Some stories are laugh-out-loud funny. Others are tragic. A few would serve for an episode of Twilight Zone or Game of Thrones.

Spicy, Salty, Sweet, and Tart

 

Our maid had only a few tools in her back patio kitchen: a machete, a stout clay charcoal stove, a coconut grater, a mortar and pestle, and a large red and white platter. Perhaps you’d also find a blackened wok, a couple of cheap aluminum pots, and a cone-shaped straw basket (with lid) for steaming sticky rice. But when she got to work with her basic complement of cooking equipment, our mouths watered.

My siblings and I had decided long ago, even back in the village before our move to a town near the Mekong,  that we didn’t like American food. Oh, the occasional hamburger and hand-cut french fries would do for birthdays. But Thai food–not limp, stringy stir-fried bean sprouts–but real Northeastern Thai food that you could crunch and savor, like green papaya salad, won our full approval.

Member Post

 

NYC’s new mayor is a vegan, and he thinks you should be a vegan, too. Because food is like heroin, or something.  “Food is addictive. You take someone on heroin, put them in one room, and someone hooked on cheese, put ’em in another room, and you take it away, I challenge you to tell […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Quote of the Day: Nine Meals

 

“There are only nine meals between mankind and anarchy.” – Alfred Henry Lewis 

We have never had food riots in the United States or Canada. There was no need. Both nations have produced surpluses of food throughout their history and have been net food exporters. Certainly in the last 120 years, no one had worried about starving.

Member Post

 

There are only nine meals between mankind and anarchy – Alfred Henry Lewis  We have never had food riots in the United States or Canada. There was no need. Both nations have produced surpluses of food throughout their history and have been net food exporters. Certainly in the last 120 years no one had worried […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Is Food Waste Really Your Problem?

 

If you’re of a certain age, especially growing up in Heartland, USA, you heard these words from a parent at the dinner table while growing up: “Clean your plate. There are starving kids in China.”

That wasn’t wrong. Millions died from starvation during Chairman Mao’s Communist cultural revolution in China during the 1960s and early ’70s. It’s a sordid tale. The “Great Leap Forward,” Mao called it. To the grave, perhaps.

A Constitutional Right to … Food?

 

One of the more interesting ballot questions last Tuesday was Question 3 in Maine. The 43-word constitutional amendment, overwhelmingly approved by voters, reads as follows:

“All individuals have a natural, inherent and unalienable right to food, including the right to save and exchange seeds and the right to grow, raise, harvest, produce and consume food of their own choosing for their own nourishment, sustenance, bodily health and well-being, as long as an individual does not commit trespassing, theft, poaching or other abuses of private property rights, public lants, or natural resources in the harvesting, production or acquisition of food.”

On Relishing Pickles

 

I have always loved pickles.  Dill, sweet, bread & butter – I like the pickled cucumber.  Strangely enough, I do not like unpickled cucumber at all.  This also goes for relish, the hot dog’s eternal companion alongside mustard.  (As far as hot dogs are concerned, I am NeverKetchup.  Chicagoans have more tolerance for conservatives than ketchup on a hot dog)  Relish was spreadable pickles, so naturally it would be awesome.  Since I have been attempting to eat healthy, I have been adding more and more pickles to my diet, including on sandwiches with various flavors of mustard.

Then one day I was (0f all things) playing a video game which had a cooking minigame.  One of the recipes was relish, made with corn and tomatoes without a cucumber in sight.  This was apparently a good topping for a hamburger.  Now I would never get my cooking tips from a video game, but I was intrigued.  What were these relishes without pickles – was this a UK thing?  This led me down a rabbit hole of articles.   Relish covers a huge range of toppings, including onion relish and something called chow chow, which I previously thought was a dog.  Chow chow is apparently a sweet onion/cabbage/pepper relish like a sweet sauerkraut, popular in certain regions of the US.  Sauerkraut is another condiment I love, especially with brats or Polish sausages or pierogi.

Your Food Is Not Racist

 

You there. Yes, you, standing between your pantry and refrigerator. It is time for a “conversation” about race. We’ll start with your food. Open your pantry. Look on the shelf. That one. There.

See that five-pound bag of white granulated sugar? Do you know the racist history of sugar plantations and cultivation in our hemisphere, from Haiti to the southern slaves who were forced to cultivate it?

QQ For You and Me: Bubble Tea, Diplomat

 

You may know it as bubble tea, tapioca tea, pearl milk tea, or boba tea. You may not know it at all. But, like popcorn chicken and scallion pancakes, bubble tea is a Taiwanese invention that’s grown to be beloved worldwide. And it’s not just a culinary triumph for the tiny democracy; it’s also become a symbol of important, and strengthening, international ties in the modern age. 

Member Post

 

I’ll bet you thought I was going to respond to my title with, “When it’s over!” But, no, that won’t be for a while, and since I am having a good day (except for five hours receiving an infusion today—glitches in their delivery system), I thought I’d share my reflections on those things that have […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Join Jim and Greg as they see some glimmers of good news for Putin critic Alexei Navalny but wonder how firm the Biden administration really plans to be when it comes to Russia. They also shudder as prices for fuel, food, and other goods, are clearly on the rise. And they call out Rep. Maxine Waters for suggesting anything less than a guilty verdict for murder in the Derek Chauvin case should result in more confrontation in the streets.

Member Post

 

Ramadan is starting. I wouldn’t exactly say I’m still sleeping off the last one. But still. At least it’s something to do. Nothing goes with Ramadan like “thinking about food”! Except maybe thinking about commerce. Alert readers will recall it was during some Ramadan – these things do blur together – that I learned, from […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Hot Cross Buns (updated with photo)

 

Wildflower Bread hot cross bunsHot cross buns have been associated with the Easter season for centuries. The tradition started in Britain and spread with the empire. That helps explain why the tradition would not be recognized by a desert southwest coffeehouse keeper, as these buns were not part of the old Spanish  culture. As Ree Drummond, the Pioneer Woman, wrote:

English folklore said that Hot Cross Buns baked on Good Friday would never spoil throughout the following year. Some bakers believed that holding on to one Hot Cross Bun and hanging it in the kitchen meant that all yeast products in the coming year would rise successfully. Some sailors took Hot Cross Buns on their voyages to ensure their ships wouldn’t sink. And friends who gift one another with Hot Cross Buns every year are said to remain friends for life.

I noted several years ago that Panera Bread stopped offering hot cross buns, while an Arizona chain, Wildflower Bread, continues to offer holiday orders of hot cross buns. This year, I thought I would try my hand at baking a batch.