Tag: Flannery O’Connor

As we celebrate National Catholic Schools Week, “The Learning Curve” co-host Cara Candal talks with Dr. Jennifer Frey, an associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of South Carolina and fellow of the Institute for Human Ecology at the Catholic University of America. Dr. Frey shares why Catholic education is so vitally important in the lives of families, schoolchildren, and communities, with its commitment to nurturing an appreciation for “the true, the good, and the beautiful” among students from all faith backgrounds. She offers thoughts on the steps educators must follow to confirm a strong faith-based role in students’ lives. They next discuss the life of Southern fiction writer Flannery O’Connor, among the most important Catholic authors of the 20th century, and how her powerful writing about grace can impart timeless truths to high schoolers. Dr. Frey describes O’Connor’s mix of humor, tragedy, and satire, some of the troubling elements of our age that she depicted, and how her life, faith, and fiction can guide readers toward moral courage in the face of adversity. Dr. Frey concludes the interview with a reading from one of Flannery O’Connor’s works.

Related: A Vision of Hope – Catholic Schooling in Massachusetts

Loving Pain as Given: A Review of Heroes, a Dark Twist on the Grateful Acre

 

For B, and other youth whose grateful acres host, if not prairies, at least patchy meadows. And for Gary McVey.

It’s been a year since Will Arbery’s play, Heroes of the Fourth Turning, took the conservative Catholic blogosphere – or rather, that part able to see the play or a private script – by storm. Now the script is available to the public. I ordered my copy here. If you can afford to, read it. Theaters remain closed, but the theater of imagination richly rewards reading a play. Reading reveals motifs easy to miss when a play just happens to you in performance and you can’t revisit it. This review addresses unspoken pressures, like the prosperity gospel (which may not influence orthodox Christians’ theology, but can influence their social expectations), behind what conservatives speculate is Heroes’ demonic finale, the “We” who may, or may not be, Legion.

ACF #32: Mud

 

Ready Player One is a worldwide hit and the lead actor, teenager Tye Sheridan, is headed for fame. So your trusty podcast brings you the story on his best performance, in Jeff Nichols’s Mud, alongside Matthew McConaughey, Reese Witherspoon, the late Sam Shepard, and Michael Shannon. The movie came out in 2012 and was nominated for the most important art film award, the Palme D’or at Cannes. It’s a coming-of-age story set in Nichols’s native Arkansas, on the Mississippi, and it owes a lot to both Mark Twain’s Huck Finn and Flannery O’Connor’s violence and religion storytelling. It’s all-American in the best way, not least because it showcases the full humanity of the drama of rural communities that seem to have run out of future.

Member Post

 

Hats off to Bobby Finger of Jezebel’s Pictorial for the witty headline “A Good Flannery O’Connor Stamp Will Soon Be Easy to Find.” If the U.S. Postal Service had affixed Flannery’s face to a 49-cent Forever stamp, I would purchase a Costco-Sam’s Club quantity and be set for the remainder of my time on Earth. […]

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A Good Man is Hard to Find: HBO’s “True Detective” (Spoilers) — Louis Beckett

 

After eight chapters of suspense in HBO’s True Detective — the quest to track down “The Yellow King” that spanned an uncharted bayou of evil — the show’s greatest surprise had nothing to do with crime-solving. It came when Rust (Matthew McConaughey), a devout nihilist throughout the series, admitted to Marty (Woody Harrelson) that, amid so much darkness, “the light’s winning.”

Despite the shocking displays of unspeakable horrors committed by the show’s killer, viewers were most shocked by that moment of grace capping the finale. NPR’s critic called it “hooey.” Two separate New Yorker reviewers skewered the ending, suggesting that the show’s popularity (demand for the finale crashed HBO GO) had just been a spell of delusion by the audience. A friend, similarly appalled by the conclusion, wrote to me during the credits: “Give me a break.”