Tag: Film

Member Post

 

1984 is a specific year. In 1984, Tetris was first released, Ghostbusters hit theaters, and Virgin Atlantic made their first flight, however, most of us don’t think of those events when we think about that year. Thanks to George Orwell, 1984 has become synonymous with government overreach, complete control of the populace, and the thought […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

The curtain was lowered on the tragic, rotten tomato known as 2020, and as it fell, was peppered with whole boxes of uneaten popcorn and hundreds of Milk Duds from angry moviegoers wishing they could get their money back. But at least Gumby Mark was moderately satisfied having won his first fight. And as he […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

As we spend the holiday weekend channel surfing, or scrolling through our streaming services looking for a two-hour escape from news of the crumbling Republic we will no doubt come across Roadhouse. Whether or not we admit it, most of us will stop and watch at least a few scenes. Hoyacon knew it, chose it, and […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

What if Frodo was not the lead protagonist of The Lord of the Rings? What might the story be like if told through only one character’s perspective?  The same fictional world. The same setting of time, over-arching threats, characters great and small, etc. How might the events change if you guided Frodo’s decisions? Then start […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Last week, J D Fitzpatrick, gave us an opportunity to watch some of the best duels ever filmed. The voting became a duel itself as Songwriter slowly wore down Philo over several days. On Friday they clashed swords up the castle stairs, finally collapsing in a bloody draw, causing JD Fitzpatrick to step in to […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Ricochet Movie Fight Club: Question 20

 


Two-time champion, Brian Watt, learned exactly how hard it is to win three in a row. Teaching that lesson (with a little help from a blind Audrey Hepburn) was J D Fitzpatrick, who earned the right to ask: What movie has the best duel? All movies should be pre-CGI. For this question, a duel is defined as a single moment of combat between two characters, with a clear resolution. Duels can be short or long, but they should display unity of time, place, and action, meaning that the contest is restricted to a particular moment in the film, not drawn out over its course.
The Rules:

  • Post your answer as a comment. Make it clear that this is your official answer, one per member.
  • Defend your answer in the comments and fight it out with other Ricochet member answers for the rest of the week.
  • Whoever gets the most likes on their official answer comment (and only that comment) by Friday night wins the fight.
  • The winner gets the honor of posting the next question on Saturday.
  • In the case of a tie, the member who posted the question will decide the winner.

Notes:

  • Only movies will qualify (no TV shows) however films that air on television (BBC films, a stand-alone mini-series) will qualify.
  • Your answer can be as off-the-wall or controversial as you’d like. It will be up to you to defend it and win people to your side.
  • Fight it out.

Movie Fight Club Questions by Week:

Member Post

 

Last week, Brian Watt asked a simple question that created a complex discussion on what makes a bad movie bad. As a result we learned a lot about one another, including getting a good look at Samuel and his dog. But Brian was the only one standing at the end of that 300 comment battle […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

More than a couple tries were taken to get where I wanted to be with this group writing post. It began as an exploration of the filmography of Cab Calloway (yes, I have been watching too many Al Jolson movies), then became a review of/pitch for watching a Russian indie film, and finally manifested as […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Reels? We Don’t Need No Reels–August Group Writing Project

 

A reel of film is one of the most universally recognized symbols on Earth. It means glamour and show business. Hollywood. But as with a lot of stock images and phrases, obsolescence sets in. Since the turn of the century, digital “film” cameras are really just vastly improved video cameras, and theater projectors are now digital devices that show a movie off a hard drive. Other than museums and specialty events, after roughly 125 years of motion pictures, we don’t use reels of film anymore and haven’t much in almost a generation.

In the film industry since the earliest silent days, the metaphorical expression a “reel” simply means ten minutes. If someone refers to “the fifth reel” of a picture, they mean roughly 40 to 50 minutes in. But the only reels you’d ever be likely to see, the ones in a projection booth, are 20 minutes long and have been since shortly after WWII. As noted, a lot of film technical language is obsolete.

Ricochet Movie Fight Club: Question 18

 

Last week Brian Watt came out of his corner raging for a Page One knockout. Philo’s Page Three uppercut sent him reeling and Brian ended up clinging to the ropes, eying the clock but still upright when the final bell sounded. His jaw may be a little sore today, but not too sore to ask: What is the worst movie (not a made-for-TV movie) ever made?

From Brian:

It should be a movie shown in a movie theater produced or distributed by a major studio (MGM, Universal, United Artists, 20th Century Fox, Columbia, RKO, Warner Brothers, Disney, etc.); a movie that others may have raved about which prompted you to see it; that was so bad, you may have walked out or griped about it and felt cheated for wasting your money on it; so bad that you may have even heckled it or made catcalls at the screen in the theater while watching it; and so bad that you may actually think less of others’ taste in movies – whether critics, celebrities, or friends — who actually hold this awful film in high regard.

Member Post

 

Last week Arahant asked about the best love story. Songwriter was quick to snatch up The Princess Bride which had no trouble knocking out heavyweights like Casablanca, Dr. Zhivago, and even The Passion of the Christ. Two things happened as a result 1) we learned to never underestimate the might of The Princess Bride, and […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

It took a mere 219 comments to convince us that Arahant was right (he usually is) and that Casablanca was the most entertaining movie set in WWII. Today he gets to revel in his victory and also ask this week’s question: What is the best movie love story? The Rules: Post your answer as a comment. Make […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Week 13 saw a Gary McVey, and Repmodad slug it out twelve rounds, then pull off their gloves and wrestle into the stands. Repmodad finally knocked him out in the parking lot, winning the right to ask: What is the quintessential American movie?  You can go a lot of ways with this one. Happy Independence […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Last week Charlotte edged out Richard O’Shea for the win. It may have been Covid-19’s fault, officials are looking into it. This week Charlotte asks: Name the best animated feature-length movie of all time. Ideally “best” would encompass story, character development, and technical brilliance (ie, it should be beautiful to look at). Go!The Rules: Post your […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Pursuant to Ricochet Movie Fight Club rules section 37B, which states the undersigned shall forfeit all rights privileges and licenses herein and herein contained et cetera et cetera… huhh fax mentis incendium gloria culpum et cetera et cetera… huhh memo bis punitor delicatum, LC the runner up of last week’s Movie Fight Club question asks: […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Tex929rr, winner of last week’s Movie Fight Club question has a fun one this week, he asks: What is your favorite little known movie? Hopefully we’ll lead each other to some hidden gems to try out this weekend (we could all use the distraction). Of course, the most popular answer will win the fight. The […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

First, Be Good

 

I hate to admit this, but MacGyver is not good. I’m not referring to the unwatchable reboot currently withering away on CBS. No, I mean the original Richard Dean Anderson vehicle of awesomeness which aired from 1985-1992.

Dat dat dat dat dat dat daaaaa, dat dat daaaaa. The theme song gets you pumped, right? It makes we want to go rifling through the kitchen junk drawer, grab the broken can openers and fashion a defibrillator, just in case we need one. Or take the mercury out of those unused curly cue light bulbs (still in the four-year-old box, because they suck) and make…something with mercury, and batteries!

MacGyver was more than a hero, he was a superhero. In the days before Captain America, comic book superheroes were lame. Heroes were more grounded in reality: “The A-Team” (a bunch of guys with guns and explosives), “Knight Rider” (a guy with a tricked out car), “Walker, Texas Ranger” (a cop with a good roundhouse). But MacGyver was more than all that; he became a verb. Younger folk might not understand, but I’ll bet every GenXer knows what it means to “MacGyver the crap out of (something).” Amen?

The Art of Unplanned

 

Last year’s Gosnell and the recently released Unplanned present a thorny problem for Conservatives who choose to write about film. The morals that drive these films are undoubtedly in line with the cultural right since both are anti-abortion. That is their sole raison d’etre. It is the reason the films were made and the reason viewers bought their tickets.

So their status as art is dubious from the get-go. The question of whether or not film, and photography generally, is an art is still seriously debated in certain circles. But leaving aside that very complicated discussion, which seems to have no purchase on the popular imagination, these two films represent a perfect litmus test for whether or not a film enthusiast of the Conservative persuasion has integrity as both a person of virtue and critic of the moving picture.

Because neither film is a great exemplar of cinema. They are essentially serviceable films made in the Lifetime or TV movie mode. Neither is interesting in their own right as a film. Neither will be watched for their own sake. They will not be enduring classics, eventually relegated to that shadowy forgotten land where The Cross and the Switchblade and The Thief in the Night series rest undisturbed. Because if artistic outcomes mean anything they must mean that something is valued for its own sake. A great film is sought out for the same reason that a great dessert is, simply because it is delicious.