Tag: FGA

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. 3 Conservative Solutions for Baltimore

 
Child offers Baltimore police officer a bottle of water. (Image Credit: Bishop Cromartie)

With the depressing news out of Baltimore, conservatives are again decrying the social consequences of the welfare state, fatherless neighborhoods, and multigenerational poverty. We have repeatedly warned that misery and unrest would be the result of LBJ’s War on Poverty and related policies sold to the American people as “compassion.” There is no joy seeing these predictions come true.

As with Detroit and other failed liberal utopias, the press is desperate to blame the Baltimore riots on conservatives, even though the city has had only Democratic mayors since 1967 (when Nancy Pelosi’s brother was elected). Observers also blame systematic racism, even though just one white mayor has served since 1987 (expected presidential candidate Martin O’Malley) and the city has an African-American city council president, police chief, and top prosecutor. Even half of the police force is black. Despite the spin, fiscal and social liberalism is what failed Baltimore.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Obamacare’s Medicaid Expansion Gives Priority to Ex-Cons

 

States continue to debate whether they should expand their Medicaid programs under Obamacare. While the siren song of “free money” from Washington, D.C. lures governors from both parties, states often cut the budgets of programs helping the truly needy to prioritize a massive influx of able-bodied patients. Even worse, one third of those patients have criminal histories:

Lawmakers in expansion states have decided to put their most needy citizens on the chopping block so they can move able-bodied, working-age adults; almost all of whom (82 percent) have no children to support, nearly half of whom (45 percent) do not work, many of whom (35 percent) with a record of run-ins with the criminal justice system to the front of the line. So what happens to those on the ObamaCare chopping block? States that previously expanded Medicaid had to eliminate coverage for life-saving organ transplants, overload waitlists for services, cap enrollment and raise patient costs, all because promises were broken and costs exceeded projections.