Tag: FEMA

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I’m not going anywhere special. Is anyone? I just wanted to do something normal. The color is called “Racing Rose”. I have enough time on my hands to think that the two words don’t go together. The Florida Surgeon General came across cell phones today telling people who are 65+ or have health issues to […]

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Surviving Hurricane Michael – Part One

 

Sunday, October 7th – As a property manager in the Florida Panhandle, I awaken to text from customer, “Can you empty frig of perishables due to the tropical storm?” “Yes – no problem” I answer, then ask myself what tropical storm? I pull up weather.com and see something has just formed in the Caribbean, heading for the Gulf of Mexico. I alert my husband. “Oh? Ok.” And it’s off to visit in-laws in Panama City Beach.

Monday, October 8th, Columbus Day – Tropical storm likely to form into a CAT 1 – head out to prep properties for possible CAT 1 hurricane. I procrastinate going shopping, am out of my usual food, etc. Decide to head to Walmart Santa Rosa Beach early 9:00 AM. Store is packed, employees said water is almost gone, sheriff’s department stocking up. I decide to top off gas – head home and unload groceries – head out to Scenic Highway 30A to prepare properties for storm. Finish late afternoon – pass gas station with long lines and cop directing traffic. Encounter many tourists in golf carts, kids in bathing suits, large groups riding bikes, grills firing up, a jolly mood this holiday weekend, no one concerned, party atmosphere, roads clogged. One woman asks where should I gas up — she hasn’t a drop, her large SUV with Texas tags sits in the driveway. I said go now and fill up – may be evacuations tomorrow. She’s shocked as she walks her dog. Start to see yellow bags covering gas pumps. I go home and start filling plastic bags with ice.

The latest FEMA “strategic plan” mentions “risking natural hazard risk” but not a peep about global warming, rising sea levels or devastating weather. Alice Hill, a Hoover Institution research fellow focusing on building resilience to catastrophic events, discusses the Trump Administration’s reluctance to utter the phrase “climate change” and where scientific debate stands in 2018.

Americans watched with forlorn fascination as devastating hurricanes laid waste to stretches of Florida and Texas. Hoover research fellow Alice Hill explains how the nation can better prepare for future natural disasters. The key word is “resilience.”

The Schoolbuses of Katrina

 

While we are still chattering about Hurricane Harvey and keeping an eye on Hurricane Irma, I saw a couple of comments that are worth a follow-up post of its own.

You all remember how we watched the flooding in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, and how we all saw the fleet of schoolbuses that were inundated instead of serving to evacuate the City. Evidently, those pictures were very memorable, but not nearly as memorable as the actual narrative of events. There is plenty to fault the City of New Orleans for, and especially there fault to be laid at the feet of Mayor Nagin and Governor Blanco, but I do not fault them for the schoolbuses.

Evacuating a big city is a huge problem. Especially so for New Orleans, since there are not many highway evacuation routes available. The likelihood is that an evacuation would cause lots of traffic crash deaths and lead to a politician becoming a laughingstock if the hurricane does not turn out to be so damaging as the weather forecasters had made it out to be. Everyone over 50 on the coast remembers occasions when they were told to evacuate, decided not to, and then experienced a bad storm that had not warranted evacuation.

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I shouldn’t catch news updates before going to bed. The other night Tucker Carlson of Fox News had a guest on that talked about EMP’s and explained what would happen if one were launched over the US. In a nutshell, it’s back to the 1800’s for six months to a year while we try to […]

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Susan Quinn’s recent post on Cyber Threats http://ricochet.com/cyber-warfare-the-russians-are-coming/ prompted me to share the following check list. While many on Ricochet are well prepared, we have many new members and I wanted to share the information I posted on my blog when we had unprecedented local flooding a couple years back: Preview Open

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Had This Been an Actual Emergency…

 

NATIONAL-EAS-TEST-HDDuring WWII, Allied bomber crews used the broadcast signals of German radio stations as a giant set of navigation beacons. After the war, the Truman Administration was afraid that the Soviets would use US radio and television stations in the same way and created the CONELRAD (Control of Electromagnetic Radiation) System. Only radio stations on 640 and 1240 AM would remain on the air, alternating in five-minute increments.

With the onset of the ICBM threat, CONELRAD was replaced by the Emergency Broadcast System. The original purpose of the EBS was to find a way for the president to address all of the United States within ten minutes. It eventually morphed into a regional alert system as well for natural disasters.

One of my first duties in television was cutting my station’s EBS audio. I was also in charge of making sure the authentication codes were up to date. In case of a national emergency declared by the president, you put the system on the air only after you matched the code word that was received in a sealed envelope.