Tag: felons

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer new poll numbers showing Americans overwhelming reject the idea of felons voting from behind bars, an idea promoted by Sen. Bernie Sanders.  They also shudder at reports – apparently from Michael Cohen – that Cohen helped Liberty University President Jerry Falwell, Jr. squash the possible release of highly embarrassing photos, and that eventually triggered Falwell’s endorsement of Trump in early 2016.  And Jim unleashes a terrific rant in response to the pro-choice CNN guest who says a pregnant woman does not have a human being inside of her.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are finally back together.  Today they relish Bernie Sanders doubling down on his push for incarcerated felons to have the right to vote, with Jim explaining how the issue could really damage Bernie if he becomes the nominee.  They also roll their eyes as Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan seriously mulls a primary challenge to President Trump while still lagging badly behind juggernauts like John Kasich and William Weld.  And Jim surprisingly agrees with the woke USA Today columnist who is slamming the likely No. 2 overall pick in this week’s NFL Draft for shying away from his conservative politics on social media – although Jim’s motivation for agreeing remains a tad suspicious

Member Post

 

Like three other states—Iowa, Kentucky and Virginia—felons could not regain their right to vote without going through an appeals process. It wasn’t that they could never vote again; rather, they had additional steps to go through to be enfranchised. Florida has dropped that requirement by approving a constitutional amendment. I think this is a mistake. […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Wisdom from America’s #2 spoiled brat, David Hogg: “In Florida, the number of African-Americans who can’t vote because of a previous conviction is 21%. In Kentucky, it is 26%. In Alabama, it is 15-16%. These are people of color who have been historically discriminated against and still are to this day.” Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.