Tag: February 2018 QOTD

QOTD: On Friends

 

“The friend who can be silent with us in a moment of despair or confusion, who can stay with us in an hour of grief and bereavement, who can tolerate not knowing . . . not healing . . . not curing . . . that is a friend who cares” — Fr. Henri Nouwen

Truth be told, 2017 was not particularly kind to Chez She, its denizens, our family, and our friends. And so far, the opening salvos of 2018 do not indicate a trend in any sort of encouraging direction. I have had many better years, and few worse (my barometer for “worse” has a pretty low baseline to start with, trust me on that).

Member Post

 

There are so many quotes about joy, and its place of importance in our society. Take joy in the small things, never let your heart be without joy, etc. The importance of joy has been expressly stated throughout religious texts and history. “Joy is the infallible sign of the presence of God.” ― Pierre Teilhard de Chardin […]

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Quote of the Day: Stress

 

I have been under an increasing amount of stress and pressure at work for the past six months. I’ve never dealt with stress very well and this time has been no different. It’s not helped by the wonky blood sugar issues I’ve been experiencing or the latest round of flu that I feel coming on thanks to co-workers who couldn’t be bothered to stay away from the office when sick.

I’ve learned over the past week, however, that I need to realign my perspective of my ever-growing to-do list and the constant interruptions I get while working in the office. I need to change how I react to it. I’m normally very good at my reactions to bad stuff, but work-related stress is something I’ve never tackled before.

Quote of the Day: The Lord’s Prayer

 

“Give us this day our daily seal.” — Hans Egede’s translation of the Lord’s Prayer for Greenland aboriginal people.

Translating the Bible is difficult. Frankly, translating any work can be difficult. Different languages put more freight on certain words than others. It can be difficult to capture all of the metaphorical meanings of a given word or phrase when rendering it into another language. This becomes truer as the languages are further apart, coming from different language families. Moreso, when the language one is translating into, has no word for the word in the original language.

Member Post

 

The Quote of the Day is the easiest way to start a fun conversation on Ricochet. You don’t have to be intelligent, pithy, or eloquent yourself. You can bask in the wisdom of another, someone who went through the hard knocks of acquiring that wisdom, pithiness, and eloquence. Or, you can even quote your favorite […]

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