Tag: Fatherhood

Whoa, whoa, whoa … Stacy spent how much on her daughter’s haircut? And Teri’s fixing to fight back against the chaos dividing our country, but how? Are Dads the answer? Also, the ladies have some Netflix suggestions, but beware, Stacy’s are a little bit risque!

We’re Losing Our Boys

 

The latest tragedies, raw and painful, seem to be reflecting a similar thread: young men. Look at the age of the recent shooter at a Walmart in Texas (21 years old,) the killer in Dayton (24), the age of the boy being accused of the murder of the young co-ed at Ole Miss. Look at the ages of the boys on a murderous rampage across Canada, the Florida school shooting, the recent California shooting at the Garlic Festival, the Synagogue in Pittsburgh. They are all young men consumed with hate and vengeance, and armed to do as much damage as possible. They leave “manifestos,” they shout, “I’m angry!”, they cease to think and feel, or see their fellow human beings as part of their world.

The struggle to find blame is next. Social media, politics, violent video games, rampant porn and the new virile push of social engineering are playing a role. Young men begin as young boys, innocent, but are being influenced by all of these things, and their core personalities, their sense of self, is being corrupted, at younger and younger ages. I am not sympathizing with the killers, these acts are beyond despicable, but the patterns are showing these similarities.

The radical group Antifa, whose network now stretches across the continent to Europe, is composed of young men mostly, very angry, courting physical confrontation, and at the very least, intimidation and control.  Young women have become more fearful and maybe rightly so.  I have to think that the removal of boundaries, lack of consequences for actions, monitoring what is being taught in schools, what is accessible on the Internet, the decline of the family and faith, are now all bearing rotten fruit.  The family and the Church have always been the armor before sending young people into the world to live their dream and find their purpose, and to sustain them going forward.

June Group Writing – Dads are Hot

 

Dads get little respect today. The foolish father is a stock element in sitcoms, the government treats fathers like the disposable element in families, even as dangerous. Your male buddies, especially the unmarried ones, razz you: you are no longer a free man, they say, you are tied down for the next twenty years, they say.

Yet, dads are vital. Boys need men around to grow into men. There is a difference between a man who knows how to use his strength to protect others and one that knows how to use it only to get what they want. It is the difference between a wolf and a guard dog. The example set by an engaged, caring father is the best way for a boy to learn what it is.

Every Other Sunday

 

Have you ever loved something but hated it at the same time? I do. It’s a song by Zac Brown Band called Highway 20 Ride.

Music has a way of transporting a person to a point in time like few other mediums. Many songs do this to me, but Highway 20 Ride is noteworthy, and if you’ve ever been affected by divorce, it might be for you as well.

Celebrating the Man Who Showed Me What It Means to Be a Man

 

My dad died Thursday. That’s a sentence I’ve been thinking through over the last couple weeks, but I’ve never wanted to say.

Just under a month ago when they took him to the hospital with stroke-like symptoms, that was bad enough. It got worse when we found out that it was a brain tumor. We thought we could fight it at first. Yeah, it would be hard, but we could do it. But as time progressed and complications amassed, it came to the point where treatment options fell off the table one by one, and all we were left with was palliative care. But even through that, dad was still himself. Sure, the tumor caused him to lose the use of the left side of his body, but he didn’t lose his personality.

After he had been airlifted from West Palm Beach to Halifax1, his first request was for a bucket of KFC. And even on his last full night, he got my sister to pick up an appetizer platter from Boston Pizza2. He was still telling jokes to us and laughing at every one we told him. He was thanking the doctors and nursing staff at every chance he could get, even to the point of sending my mom to pick up pizza for the nurses. And he took every available opportunity to lean in for a kiss (or six) from my mom.

Member Post

 

“A Quiet Place” is a post-apocalyptic horror/thriller movie about a family trying to survive from monsters that hunt by sound. The characters do not talk very much, but their actions speak volumes about family. It is one of those rare movies that has a nuclear family and shows the value of family and sacrifice. Major […]

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Member Post

 

Mike Jefferson had me on his sports podcast to discuss the NFL protests, the blight of inner-city education, the “genocide” of black youth shooting each other and the lie the Left purports regarding police brutality. Open-minded folks like Mike J. sharing a right-of-center perspective with his audience is a good start in bringing people together, as […]

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Kevin and Sam Sorbo on “Let There Be Light”

 

Kevin Sorbo (“God’s Not Dead,” “Hercules: The Legendary Journeys”, and “Andromeda”) and his wife Sam (Actor, Director, and Producer) discuss the most anticipated Christian film of the year, the critically acclaimed “Let There Be Light”. We talk about the state of faith in American culture, mainstream culture, Fatherhood and much more.

Member Post

 

I’ll admit, I don’t watch TV that much, and it’s been six years since the last episode of Friday Night Lights.  I have friends who never tuned in to FNL because they hate football.  But as any fan will tell you, It’s not about football!  The game is a premise and a metaphor; the show […]

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Take Me Out of the Ballgame

 
675px-Adam_LaRoche_on_April_27,_2015

By Keith Allison on Flickr – Originally posted to Flickr as “Adam LaRoche“, CC BY-SA 2.0.

In addition to being a politics geek, I’m a sports nut. I love most professional sports, and I’m fortunate to have a freelance gig working on NFL radio broadcasts each fall. I love sports news and talk, so I’ve been the kind of guy who gets home, turns on ESPN, and watches Pardon the Interruption, followed by an hour or an hour-and-a-half of SportsCenter before getting onto political news.

Member Post

 

Book Review Without taking adult risks, rewards are trivial By MARK LARDAS “Heavy Lifting: Grow Up, Get a Job, Start a Family, and Other Manly Advice,” by Jim Geraghty and Cam Edwards, Regnery Publishing, 2015, 256 pages, $27.99 (Hardcover) Is being a dad cool? “Heavy Lifting: Grow Up, Get a Job, Start a Family, and […]

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Darwin Was Wrong…

 

shutterstock_133811405…and Lamarck was right.

Well, maybe. Of the two major theories of human evolution developed in the 19th century, Darwin believed in natural selection — that human traits are passed along through DNA and not through environmental factors — and Lamarck believed that parents can transmit environmentally acquired traits.

Darwin won the sweepstakes, but Lamarck may not have been entirely wrong. From ArsTechnica:

Member Post

 

Now here’s something. Too bad it’s an advertisement for a disgusting cereal, because this ad is pretty peculiar. Sure, it’s a little contrived, preachy, and not just a little bit silly. But when’s the last time you saw a dad on tv who wasn’t a fool or a shlub?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GYxH2-WeZY  Preview Open

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The Paternal Instinct

 

I’d like to ask the dads here: when did you first think it might be great, or kinda cool, or even possible for you to become a dad someday?

I have a 20-something son and have known my daughter’s 20-something boyfriend for years now, and both are wonderful guys.  My daughter and her female friends make no bones about fussing delightedly over babies brought to work or babysitting for their nieces and nephews. It’s probably very normal that these guys keep their arms safely locked behind their backs when a baby is in the room, and conveniently have important meetings to get to when there is babysitting to be done.