Tag: Fantasy

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My name is Gordon, “Jack” Gordon, and I’m a private detective. To be more precise, my name is Alexander Dunbar Douglas Henryson Jardine Keith Kerr Stewart Gordon. I am descended from many Scottish noble families. I am also descended from all of the most famous of the Scottish makars, including the two men involved in […]

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Part 1 2 3 4 5 Part Six Dusty started undoing all of the magic spells that still lingered around the conference room. He quickly pulled Walpole and Percival aside for a few words, and then led us back to the door that joined our hotel. I retrieved my baggage from my room, and then […]

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For previous installments: 1 2 3 Part Four “Gentlemen, please step through the doorway,” the tall man stepped aside to allow us through. Preview Open

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At 7:50 AM, there was a knock on my door. I opened the door to see something I hadn’t expected. There stood Bryce in a very nice, normal suit with an overcoat and modern hat. For many years he had been affecting longer hair and a long beard as well as the robes of a […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Group Writing: The Mystery of the Missing Mermaid, Part Two

 

I hopped down from my barstool and took a few steps towards them, evaluating the situation. It looked like the five of them were ready to start throwing spells, which could be detrimental to Larry’s business, other clientele, and furnishings.

“Hey,” I yelled to get their attention as I navigated through the tables to get to them. That redirected their attention. All five started throwing curses and jinxes my way. I merely put out my hand to “catch” them and kept walking towards them.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Group Writing: The Mystery of the Missing Mermaid, Part One

 

I adjusted my collar and put my hand on my hat before walking out from the alcove that was the entrance to my building. The magical fires from the torches lit the street, paying no mind to the wind and the rain. I didn’t pay the weather much heed, either. It was a dark and stormy night that had lasted more than five hundred years. I didn’t have to think about adjusting my collar or securing my hat. It is just something we all learn to do as we grow up. We protect ourselves from the wind and the rain. Most folks cast a simple spell to deal with the weather, of course, but I can’t do that. They call me “Jack the Magicless,” and I’m a detective.

Those little things we do naturally and without thought are very important in our lives. There have been times when I was thinking about a case when I fixed supper, ate it, cleaned the dishes, and then realized I had no real memory of what I had eaten. These actions become all part of a routine, and we don’t pay them any more attention than we pay to the weather. What’s it like outside? It’s a dark and stormy night. What will it be like outside tomorrow? It will be a dark and stormy night. What will it be like outside next week? It will be a dark and stormy night. What will it be like outside next year? It will be a dark and stormy night. We don’t have to think about these things once we get used to them. They become part of the background of life. But every once in a while, something brings them to the foreground.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. QOTD: “…Brave Knights and Heroic Courage”

 

You’re actually getting two quotes for the price of one today, because I think they just complement each other so well:

“Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children the dragons can be killed.” -G. K. Chesterton

In a Ricochet semi-crossover, Jack brings on un-Young American Craig Hanks, host of the Legendarium Podcast, who makes the case that sci-fi and fantasy literature is not just for kids.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Notes on the Cosmere

 

Way back when I put up a post reviewing this novella. Get to reuse the image.
Brandon Sanderson has been writing fantasy series that are distantly connected with one another. Each series is set on its own world, with its own system of magic, that works according to its own rules. And yet each world is connected in a totality named the Cosmere. The underlying novels and series stand on their own, but you see the occasional character show up in more than one world. There are hints at a meta plot spanning the different books. In this post, I’m speculating about that meta plot.

I’ll endeavor to avoid spoilers for the individual books in question. Oh, and I’ll be confining my sources to the fiction. I could go scouring the internet for things he’s let slip in his podcast or hints from his creative writing courses. Too much bother.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday. Preview Open

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Winter’s Tale by Mark Helprin

 

If I were marooned on a desert island and could only have one book, it would be Winter’s Tale by Mark Helprin. I first read this book in a Boeing 747, in 1984, on my way to Britain for a three-week vacation with my then-husband. I remember reading a passage, I don’t remember which, that made me cry it was so beautiful.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday. Preview Open

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday. Preview Open

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. The Legendarium Podcast Has Come to Ricochet

 

At the beginning of this year, I got an offer I couldn’t refuse. Craig Hanks, who listens to the Remnant with Jonah Goldberg (on which I make furtive appearances) heard that I was reading The Silmarillion by J.R.R. and Christopher Tolkien. Craig happens to host his own podcast, The Legendarium Podcast, on which he and others discuss the great works of sci-fi and fantasy literature. He invited me onto his show to discuss The Silmarillion. You can listen to the episode here

Something strange happened when I distilled my thoughts about The Silmarillion in a post I published on Ricochet: All of Ricochet’s various nerds came out of the woodwork and had a field day discussing this somewhat more obscure “prequel” to J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. A similar thing happened when I produced another post, about God Emperor of Dune by Frank Herbert, after appearing on one episode of the Legendarium (and later another) to discuss it. 

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. ‘Noir Fatale’ a Collection of Short Stories Linked by Theme

 

Cherchez la femme — look for the woman. The phrase defines one sub-genre of noir mystery fiction.

Noir Fatale: The Dark Side of Science Fiction and Fantasy, edited by Larry Correia and Kacey Ezell, explore that sub-genre in science fiction and fantasy.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Resolved: LOTR More Realistic Than GOT

 

This post contains some spoiler from the finale of Game of Thrones and assumes some knowledge on the part of the reader of Games of Thrones and Lord of the Rings

Dany and Drogon

When talking about fantasy series it is a hard thing to talk about which was more realistic. There are a lot of ways to take the “realism” of a fantasy series, having admitted that let us look at the ways that Games of Thrones (GOT) is often said to be more realistic than Lord of the Rings (LOTR) and see which is actually more realistic.

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The Song of the Sirin, by Nicholas Kotar, is the first book in a fantasy series that incorporates Russian faery tales into a mythic world that itself resembles a medieval northwest Russia. Kotar weaves in themes of faith, loyalty, and duty, as they clash with their antitheses in a realm’s sudden existential war against an […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Book Review: All the Plagues of Hell

 

There are few better pure storytellers than Eric Flint and David Freer. Individually they’re entertaining. Together, the result is splendid. “All the Plagues of Hell,” by Eric Flint and David Freer is the latest novel in the Heirs of Alexandria fantasy series. Set in the middle of the 15th century, it’s alternate history. In this world magic works.

This book centers on Count Kazimierz Mindaug, a long-standing series villain. A Lithuanian nobleman, he fled Lithuania after a failed attempt to kill its leader, Duke Jagiellon (possessed by the demon Chernobog). Mindaug took shelter in Hungary serving the evil King Emeric of Hungary and Countess Elizabeth Barthody. Both were killed earlier in the series. Mindaug escaped, but their destruction left Mindaug with no protector against Chernobog, vengefully pursuing Mindaug.