Tag: Faith

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I was a senior in high school when I first read The Exorcist. Frankly, I found the assignment odd, wedged in, as it was, between Crime and Punishment and King Lear. Although I hadn’t yet seen the movie, scuttlebutt had it that the film was just another tired horror tale filled with the ever greater gore that was, even […]

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The last two Sundays, I have attended mass here in Birmingham. The first Sunday, I went to check out the Lebanese church, since I knew some of my relatives would give me a hard time if I didn’t. The church was beautiful! While it’s not my first time going to a Maronite mass, the combination of […]

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Kim Davis Is No Martyr

 

Kim-Davis-mugshotTed Cruz made his feelings clear about defiant county clerk Kim Davis: “Today, for the first time ever, the government arrested a Christian woman for living according to her faith.” Mike Huckabee said, “having Kim Davis in federal custody removes all doubt of the criminalization of Christianity in our country.”

Mat Staver, who is representing Davis in court, compared her to several Christian martyrs. “Kim joins a long list of people who were imprisoned for their conscience,” Staver said. “People who today we admire, like Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Jan Hus, John Bunyan, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and more — each had their own cause, but they all share the same resolve not to violate their conscience.”

Balderdash.

Kim Davis and Faith in the Workplace

 

Kim DavisKim Davis, the court clerk in Kentucky who refused to issue marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples is going to jail for contempt of court. Her reasons for refusing to do so are because, in her own words, “To issue a marriage license which conflicts with God’s definition of marriage, with my name affixed to the certificate, would violate my conscience.”

So quit your job, Kim. Problem solved.

I worked for ten years as a commercial/advertising photographer, and there were jobs I turned down on moral and religious grounds. I took a hit in the wallet for doing so, but I walked away with a clear conscience and good feeling knowing that there were just some things I would not do for money. Come to think of it, I’ve had moral qualms of one kind or another at just about every job I’ve had because I’m surrounded by people who don’t share my convictions. It’s not that I was asked to do anything illegal, but in every job, there are corners that can be cut and rules that can be bent. There were/are some lines I will not cross.

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I woke up in the middle of the night (with this idea) after falling asleep watching the following:  So forgive me if it seems a bit strange.  But at the time it seem like a life changing thought to myself.  So I feel I need to share. “If Faith were the same as Light”, What […]

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Knowledge and Faith Can Be the Same Thing

 

F-K VennIt is commonly assumed that an item of knowledge and an article article of faith can never be the same thing. This assumption is mistaken. In this post, I will explain only one point: trust in authority can be a source of knowledge. That’s what faith is: trust. It’s still the first definition of “faith” in the dictionary. Also see the Latin fides and the Greek pistis.

So don’t believe the hype that categorically separates faith from knowledge. This separation ranges from the view William James attributes to a schoolboy (“Faith is when you believe something that you know ain’t true”) to Kant’s more sophisticated idea that “I had to deny knowledge in order to make room for faith” (in beliefs that might well be true).

We should also reject the hype that says that an argument from authority is necessarily fallacious. The best logic textbook in print will tell you otherwise. It will even tell you that there is such a thing as a valid argument appealing to an infallible authority! (“Valid” is a technical term in logic; be sure to look it up first if you’re inclined to complain that there are no infallible authorities.)

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This began as a reply to Mustangman1967’s topic on Seattle, but rather than abuse the recent “5000-word limit” I decided a new topic a better option. So despite our disdain for Seattle’s new “Indigenous Peoples’ Day”, there are plenty on the Progressive side applauding this. In fact, that’s what the Council can count on: that […]

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In my family fly fishing isn’t a hobby, and it isn’t a sport. In my family fly fishing is a religion. I, however, am the family heretic. It’s not just that I find fly fishing dull (which it is). I’ve just never figured out how to do it. Plus, it seems silly to me, what […]

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1.) I wonder if we couldn’t draw an  analogy (slight) with what is going on in the Islamic world and what happened in the Jesus People Movement of the late 1960s early 1970s. I was there (at the Jesus M0vement) and somewhat involved so bear with me…I feel a riff coming on: Preview Open

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How Will People of Faith Live Now?

 

We knew when the incoherent Supreme Court decision on gay marriage came down last year that judges would ignore the law and impose gender-neutral marriage on the nation, as is now happening in several states. Our country will reap the whirlwind. So, my friends of faith, how are we now going to live?  

I’ve been thinking a lot about this. We’re going to be walking a tightrope, but we must stick to our beliefs and build communities that are as impervious as possible to the whirlwind of terrible things that are coming: polygamy, polyamory, children bought and sold, recruitment to homosexuality, pressure to ignore gender differences, a changed understanding of fidelity and so on. In other words, we will have to build a religious view of marriage that is entirely different than the secular view and the communities that revolve around it. A religious view of marriage has existed in the past, but it was not wholly different than the secular one. Now it will have to be. We are going to have to resist state efforts to crush even this. Our whole lives are going to have to change.  

A Good Man is Hard to Find: HBO’s “True Detective” (Spoilers) — Louis Beckett

 

After eight chapters of suspense in HBO’s True Detective — the quest to track down “The Yellow King” that spanned an uncharted bayou of evil — the show’s greatest surprise had nothing to do with crime-solving. It came when Rust (Matthew McConaughey), a devout nihilist throughout the series, admitted to Marty (Woody Harrelson) that, amid so much darkness, “the light’s winning.”

Despite the shocking displays of unspeakable horrors committed by the show’s killer, viewers were most shocked by that moment of grace capping the finale. NPR’s critic called it “hooey.” Two separate New Yorker reviewers skewered the ending, suggesting that the show’s popularity (demand for the finale crashed HBO GO) had just been a spell of delusion by the audience. A friend, similarly appalled by the conclusion, wrote to me during the credits: “Give me a break.”