Tag: Exodus

This week on “The Learning Curve,” guest co-host Jason Bedrick and co-host Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. Leon Kass, MD, the Addie Clark Harding Professor Emeritus in the Committee on Social Thought and the College at the University of Chicago. Dr. Kass describes the important pieces of wisdom and humanity people today can still learn from reading the Book of Genesis, the topic of his 2003 work, The Beginning of Wisdom. They next discuss his newest book, Founding God’s Nation: Reading Exodus, and general lessons about the Israelites that leaders, teachers, and students could use in addressing the challenges of modern life. They explore the influence of the Book of Exodus and the themes of liberation from captivity on the Civil Rights Movement, and several of its major leaders, including the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and what teachers and students today should learn from Exodus about deliverance from life’s hardships. Dr. Kass shares why he became interested in the Great Books, and their crucial role in helping 21st-century students receive a complete liberal arts education and lead fulfilling lives. They discuss Western education’s increasing focus on vocationally oriented and often technocratic skills at the expense of humanistic education, and why we should be concerned about it, especially in our hyper-technological era. The interview concludes with a reading from Dr. Kass’s newest book on Exodus.

Stories of the Week: Co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson discuss New York Times story on the plight of America’s nine million students in rural school districts that are underfunded, disconnected, and face myriad challenges. Pioneer Institute and other organizations submitted an amicus brief in the U.S. Supreme Court case, Carson v. Makin, to expand access to private and religious schools for families in Maine.

Member Post

 

Watching the Democratic debate last night and reading the reactions from today have actually been entertaining endeavors, more so than previous debates. Perhaps my distaste for Mike Bloomberg fueled the enjoyment. I don’t like any of the remaining Democratic candidates (I liked Andrew Yang at least a little), but Bloomberg strikes an exceptionally foul chord, […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Sharing the Sacred

 

I’m flying out very early tomorrow morning (my husband calls it the middle of the night!) to fly to the @iwe family for Passover. I want to wish all my Jewish friends a very special celebration for this time commemorating freedom, connection, and holiness. I also want to wish my Christian friends a very blessed Easter celebration.

Although our holidays are different, we all share a love of G-d, a spiritual connection and the joy of living in a country that allows us to worship as we choose. May we all appreciate that which we share together, as well as those things we honor that are uniquely part of our traditions. Blessings all!

Member Post

 

The Torah describes a developing and evolving world from the beginning of Genesis until the era of the Exodus from Egypt, all connected to the types and meanings of human relationships. The text seems to be telling us that a certain kind of human marriage and family were prerequisites for the Exodus, the events at […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

A Question About the Book of Exodus

 

PlaguesI’m listening to the Book of Exodus and I have a question. Okay, so God pops off these plagues. Then Pharaoh is ready to cry uncle a couple of times, but God hardens Pharaoh’s heart. The part I don’t get is: Why?  

It seems really counterproductive to the overall plan.

Can anybody shed some light on this for me?