Tag: European Union

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The Norwegian/French produced political thriller series Occupied which had been featured on Netflix and that just posted the show’s third season of episodes has been completely yanked from the streaming service. Netflix has provided no official explanation for removing the series as of this writing. Update: This morning, (Thursday, January 9th) Netflix restored the series […]

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I don’t know the answer to the question and so I am asking it with the hope that there is someone here who knows the law governing the European Union. Boris Johnson has been “ordered” by a rump majority in Parliament to request an extension of Brexit in just over two weeks. He is to […]

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Will Brexit actually happen? Do young Brits want it to? William F. Buckley Fellow (and Scotland native) Madeleine Kearns rejoins the Young Americans to answer these questions (after a fascinating digression about her experience with study drugs). Also, stay tuned to the very end to experience several firsts for this podcast.

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Boy, you can hear the crying and gnashing of teeth in the NY Times article, “In Italy Election, Anti-E.U. Views Pay Off for Far Right and Populist”: Italians registered their dismay with the European political establishment on Sunday, handing a majority of votes in a national election to hard-right and populist forces that ran a […]

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Victor Davis Hanson argues that the best way to upend insular elites is to relocate political institutions out of cosmopolitan settings.

On this AEI Events Podcast, AEI scholars Stan Veuger and Desmond Lachman host a panel of policy experts to discuss European economic challenges in the age of Trump. Guests Mahmood Pradhan and Alessandtro Leipold of the International Monetary Fund, along with Athanasios Orphanides from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, detail the European economic outlook and the policies needed to reground European economic recovery. They also examine the prospects for greater European integration in light of Angela Merkel’s waning political star.

Even after considerable progress, Economic disparities between the north and south remain, the European Central Bank will soon start normalizing monetary policy, Brexit negotiations are ongoing, and political uncertainty now characterizes Germany and Italy. How can we place recovery on sounder footing?

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. EU Juncker Trashes the Consent of the Governed Again

 

Unelected Juncker Orders Austria’s Kurz to Form ‘Pro-Europe’ Government

The unelected president of the European Union’s (EU) executive arm has urged the democratically elected Austrian premier to form a “pro-European” government. European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker made the comments in a letter to Sebastian Kurz, whose Christian Democrat Austrian People’s Party (OVP) topped the polls with 31.7 per cent of the vote. The right-wing Freedom Party (FPO) came in second place on 27.4 per cent, above the Social Democrats (SPO) on 26.8 per cent. Whilst the SPO is pro-EU, the FPO is Eurosceptic, promising to hold a referendum on withdrawing Austria from future EU bailouts and opposing EU migration policy.

Richard Epstein reacts to the first round of balloting in the French presidential election and explains the implications for the broader state of politics in Europe.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Book Review: What Next

 

“What Next” by Daniel HannanOn June 23rd, 2016, the people of the United Kingdom, against the advice of most politicians, big business, organised labour, corporate media, academia, and their self-styled “betters”, narrowly voted to re-assert their sovereignty and reclaim the independence of their proud nation, slowly being dissolved in an “ever closer union” with the anti-democratic, protectionist, corrupt, bankrupt, and increasingly authoritarian European Union (EU). The day of the referendum, bookmakers gave odds which implied less than a 20% chance of a Leave vote, and yet the morning after the common sense and perception of right and wrong of the British people, which had caused them to prevail in the face of wars, economic and social crises, and a changing international environment re-asserted itself, and caused them to say, “No more, thank you. We prefer our thousand year tradition of self-rule to being dictated to by unelected foreign oligarchic technocrats.”

The author, Conservative Member of the European Parliament for South East England since 1999, has been one of the most vociferous and eloquent partisans of Britain’s reclaiming its independence and campaigners for a Leave vote in the referendum; the vote was a personal triumph for him. In the introduction, he writes, “After forty-three years, we have pushed the door ajar. A rectangle of light dazzles us and, as our eyes adjust, we see a summer meadow. Swallows swoop against the blue sky. We hear the gurgling of a little brook. Now to stride into the sunlight.” What next, indeed?

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An absolutely fascinating look at how Brexit won, with clear corollaries to how Trump won as well. Instead of spending a fortune on an expensive agency (with 15% going to them out of ‘controlled expenditure’) and putting up posters to be ‘part of the national conversation’ weeks or months before the vote, we decided to […]

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Listening to the most recent Newshour program from the BBC World Service, I was bombarded by shellshocked reporters and Eurocrats tearing their hair and beating their breasts about what to do about – you guessed it – the Trumpian Menace. Given the newsreaders’ and reporters’ open sympathies with the EU, one would think “BBC” stands […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Do NATO and the EU Have a Future?

 

I was recently asked to contribute to a series on the website of the Hoover Institution Working Group on Military History. The topic was “The Unraveling of the EU and NATO,” and the precis I provided took the following form:

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the European Union are in disarray. The former has fulfilled its mission. Were it not for Russia’s seizure of the Crimea and invasion of Ukraine and the refugee crisis in Europe spawned by the sectarian Muslim conflict raging in Iraq and Syria, it would be an empty shell without any obvious function. The latter has overreached. A great success as a customs union, it is a disaster as a currency union; and the attempt to turn it into a federation—oligarchic in governance and equipped with an intrusive administrative apparatus—will end in tears.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Europe Gets Apple Right

 

iPhone_6_PLUS_preview_MG_1875On August 30, the European Commission issued a blockbuster ruling that required Ireland to recoup, with interest, the €13 billion in tax benefits that it has granted Apple since 1991. The tax breaks, the commission held, violated the European Union’s “state aid rules” that no company should be given preferential treatment under the law.

The decision elicited a strong reaction from Apple CEO Tim Cook who denounced it as “total political crap.” He was not alone in this belief. Holman Jenkins, Jr., writing in The Wall Street Journal, for example, said the decision was motivated by the European Commission’s desire to impose “tax harmonization” on all EU members as a way of “defending Europe’s stagnant social model,” which could not generate any Amazons, Googles, or Facebooks on its own. The United States Treasury echoed the same theme in a white paper that anticipated the EC’s ruling. And now Ireland, backed by Apple and Treasury, has decided to appeal the EC decision to the European Courts. Who is right, and why?

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Brexit Should Be a Good Sign for American Conservatives (But It Won’t Be)

 
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Chris Ioannou / Shutterstock.com

In the wake of the Brexit vote, it is natural to consider what the populist victory — unexpected by elite officials and opinionmakers — might mean for elections elsewhere. Does polling underestimate Donald Trump’s true level of support? Is Trump a US equivalent of Boris Johnson? Will nationalist movements on the European continent be able to make headway too?

Certainly there are similarities, lessons, and areas of overlap. However, I believe those areas of overlap are insufficient in a critical way. The vote for UK sovereignty hinged on two separate questions: 1) Does the European Union make decisions that are good for the UK? and 2) Should the EU make decisions for the UK? Most of us at Ricochet might consider those questions indistinguishable, but the distinction is important. Some UK voters didn’t mind belonging to the EU as long as the UK continued to benefit. Others objected on principle to ceding decisions to Brussels. These are both forms of populism, but are founded on different sets of values. For years, the UK Independence Party argued against tighter integration on the basis of constitutional nationalism, and could garner only limited support. The success of the Leave movement is that its leaders formed an electoral coalition of both the pragmatic nationalists and the constitutional nationalists.

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What will be the implications of Britain’s leaving the EU for nationalist parties in France and Germany. France has the ‘National Front,’ (and the much smaller Euroskeptic parties ‘Movement for France,’ and ‘France Arise’) and Germany has the Euroskeptic ‘Alternative for Germany’ and the fascist ‘National Democratic Party.’ Afaik, they all are more or less […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A Cautious Yes on Brexit

 

brexit2_3553702a-large_trans++qVzuuqpFlyLIwiB6NTmJwfSVWeZ_vEN7c6bHu2jJnT8Thursday’s vote on Brexit will perhaps be the most consequential decision that Europe has faced in several generations. The most recent polls suggest that the outcome is very close, with a small but uncertain majority in favor of staying. Last week’s polls taken after the senseless assassination of Labor MP Jo Cox, a strong supporter of Great Britain retaining its place in the European Union, point to a surge in favor of exiting for reasons that are hard to unpack. The issue is one on which I have previously equivocated. Now, after much unhappy reflection, I think that on balance a vote to leave the EU is the right choice—in part because the established leadership of both the Conservative and Labour parties is urging the opposite course.

A decision to leave or remain has vast ramifications for many aspects of British life: economics, energy, the environment, immigration, a system of weights and measures, and much more. Making a vote is a black and white yes/no decision in a world filled with grays, given that there are major advantages both ways. Staying in the EU assures England access to continental markets, which is why many, but by no means all, large firms and banks support remaining. But at the same time, staying in the EU subjects England to vast amounts of regulation from the powerful Brussels bureaucracy, which extends its tentacles with each new decree into every nook and cranny of British and European life, as Diana Furchtgott-Roth notes. Today, more law in Great Britain comes from Brussels than London.

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In the autumn of 2008, with the election of Barack Obama imminent, I began writing political satire in verse. Today, I have posted the fiftieth of those satires. I am pleasantly surprised that my inspiration has lasted for so many years and so many pieces. But more than that, I am moved that this fiftieth piece […]

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Donald Trump has called NATO obsolete. He is not all wrong. NATO was formed in 1949 for the nations of the West to form a united front against the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union is long gone. Donald Trump makes the point that the United States continues to fund NATO, from one-fifth to one-quarter of […]

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