Tag: Eureka Podcast

The Eureka Podcast: Drought and Despair in California

 

In the newest installment of the Eureka podcast, Hoover Institution fellows Carson Bruno and Bill Whalen are joined by Stanford political science professor Bruce Cain (Director of the university’s Center for the American West) to discuss the ramifications of the California drought, how government may have compounded the problem, and whether or not residents of the Golden State have to settle for a future of rock gardens and being fined for overwatering their lawns. Listen in below:

The Eureka Podcast: California’s Tax Problem

 

I’m back in California this week, being reminded all over again about this state’s many natural virtues and many manmade vices. Amongst the latter group is tax policy in the Golden State, which is — how do I put this tactfully — crazy. Beating-your-head-against-a-padded-wall crazy.

In this installment of the Eureka podcast from the Hoover Institution, I talk with Hoover fellows Carson Bruno and Bill Whalen about how the extreme progressivity of California’s tax code fuels its recurring budget crises, whether Californians are really the tax-loving lefties they’re made out to be in the popular consciousness, and whether meaningful tax reform in the Golden State is a real possibility. Listen in below:

The Eureka Podcast: California’s Affordable Housing Crisis

 

Real estate in California is expensive. That much I’m guessing you knew already. What you may not know is how much of this trend is driven by factors other than lots of people wanting to live by the beach. In this installment of the Eureka podcast from the Hoover Institution, I talk to Hoover research fellows Carson Bruno and Bill Whalen about how much of that premium results from conscious decisions by California policymakers rather than market forces. It’s an eye-opening discussion about how the policy preferences of gentry liberals can put the squeeze to the middle and lower classes. If you live in California — or any other state that’s becoming more restrictive when it comes to development — you’ll want to listen to this cautionary tale about the ultimate costs.