Tag: ethics

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Love Thy Neighbor

 

It is when we have the most cause to hate and reject our neighbors that we most need to remember the command to love them. Yes, my fellow Christians, it is a command and not merely an invitation. Though no challenge could be so difficult to fulfill, it is the foundation rather than the pinnacle of Christian love. It is a challenge not reserved only for the holiest saints but rather put to every one of us. Our Lord and Creator doesn’t even stop there. “Love thy neighbor as thy self.”

A philosophy professor and friend once caught me off guard by claiming that the Golden Rule is nothing special. Any person raised in a good home knows not to mistreat others as oneself doesn’t want to be abused.

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The early afternoons of September 2019 found me racing off from my online work to arrive breathless at a small outbuilding where I was being trained in my new job working with kids who had autism. The bell affixed to the front door jangled as I entered, glanced at the large digital clock high up […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Revoke the Pulitzer Prize for the 1619 Project: Too Little, Too Late?

 

I felt vindicated for my early attacks on the 1619 Project when I learned that the National Association of Scholars signed a letter that directed the Pulitzer Prize Board to revoke its award of the Prize to The 1619 Project. But my appreciation of the news was short-lived.

The NAS acted nobly in criticizing the 1619 Project. As they said in their letter to the Board:

We call on the Pulitzer Prize Board to rescind the 2020 Prize for Commentary awarded to Nikole Hannah-Jones for her lead essay in ‘The 1619 Project.’ That essay was entitled, ‘Our democracy’s founding ideals were false when they were written.’ But it turns out the article itself was false when written, making a large claim that protecting the institution of slavery was a primary motive for the American Revolution, a claim for which there is simply no evidence.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. On Empathy

 

If I were a drinking man, I’d play a drinking game: Open a dating app, the comments section of a Washington Post article, a feminist blog, or any other place where people of a left-wing persuasion congregate, and take a shot every time someone writes a paean to empathy.

Whatever your neighbor’s teenage daughter may say, empathy is not a virtue. Empathy is a useful and morally neutral psychological phenomenon, one which might underlie certain virtues, but one which is not itself sufficient as the basis for any coherent ethical system.* The world would not ipso facto become a better place if “everyone had more empathy.” On the contrary, it might degenerate into some version of what we see now: quivering masses of emotional gelatin demanding therapeutic self-affirmation in the form of safe spaces and coloring books; a people paralyzed in unending anguish merely because somewhere, someone is suffering. As a moral principle, empathy is self-defeating. Too often, appealing to the “capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within their frame of reference” is akin to saying, “Every action or belief is legitimate from the point of view of the person who experiences it, and therefore every action or belief is legitimate.” Empathy easily descends into excuse-making. (Take the canonical example of an abused girlfriend: Is she really better off for “showing empathy” to her abuser?) Once empathy is removed from the psychological realm and introduced to the ethical one, it negates the very purpose of ethics, which is to establish a series of principles by which actions can be judged.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Fredo Says Stop

 

We tend to think that when people oppose evil, they oppose it for noble or altruistic purposes. We think they oppose evil because the first principle of ethics is to do good and avoid evil. As rational beings who have a Jeffersonian view of men, we believe that people are basically good and that those who oppose evil are basically good. Usually, that’s true. Sometimes, however, it isn’t.

All it takes to dispossess one of the view that people who oppose political violence are good is about 20 minutes of CNN, apparently. On Tuesday, Fredo, Lemon, and company decided, much to the horror of ardent leftists, that all that violence in Portland, Chicago, Seattle, and of all places, Kenosha, Wisconsin, might need to be called out. CNN needed to go on record opposing the violence.

Join Jim and Greg as they enjoy watching former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper blame his ethics problems on “dark money” Republicans after an independent commission found him guilty of improperly accepting gifts while in office. But will it really damage his bid for U.S. Senate? They also shake their heads as Washington Gov. Jay Inslee pretends not to know a group of radicals is claiming several square blocks in Seattle as ” an “autonomous state” that is separate from the United States. And as the cancel culture claims the TV shows “COPS” and “Live: PD,” they fire back at the unhinged push against the Nickelodeon cartoon “Paw Patrol.”

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Youth and Politics

 

“All people are good at making distinctions about the things they are acquainted with, and each is a good judge of those things. Therefore, good judgment goes along with the way each one is educated, and the one who has been educated about everything has it in an unqualified way. For this reason, it is not appropriate for a young person to be a student of politics, since the young are inexperienced in the actions of life, while these are the things about which politics speaks and from which it reasons. Also, since the young are apt to follow their impulses, they would hear such discourses without purpose or benefit, since their end is not knowing but action. And it makes no difference whether one is young in age or immature in character, for the deficiency doesn’t come from the time, but from living in accord with feeling and following every impulse. For knowledge comes to such people without profit, as it does to those who lack self-restraint; but to those who keep their desires in proportion and act in that way, knowing about these things would be of great benefit.”

This quote comes from one of the first three chapters in Book One of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, with which Aristotle intends to set as a prelude to his discourse regarding how it ought to be received as well as what the task is that “we have set before ourselves.”

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Our friends at the Freedom from Religion Foundation, that paragon of easygoing menschitude, have filed a complaint against Judge Tammy Kemp, who presided over the recent trial of Amber Guyger. At the trial’s close, Kemp started a conversation with Guyger, then handed her a copy of the bible. Courtroom cameras captured Kemp reading aloud from […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Why Andrew Weissmann Is So Despised

 

The list is long for all the people who have been criticized and condemned by the Right for their participation in the Trump-Russia fiasco. Many on the list pretend to be public servants but, unfortunately, they are political hacks who have shown they are willing to do just about anything to get rid of Donald Trump. But from my perspective, one man has been mentioned only in passing, and he deserves to be in the glaring spotlight of justice. His many years of unethical behavior and manipulation need to be not just called out; there must be a way to hold him to account.

His name is Andrew Weissmann.

On paper, his credentials are impressive. But his actions over the years have manipulated the legal system, misled jurists, intimidated innocent people, and led the Special Counsel team in an unprecedented effort to remove a president. I’d like to give you some background on Weissmann, and also learn from all of you if there is any way to hold him to account after all this time.

Member Post

 

This isn’t part of the wonderful Ricochet ‘Quote of the Day Series’. I already took my turn this month – but I found the following and it’s worth repeating: “That one won’t crack, though. Mendel decided with approval; one of your flabby oak trees, Smiley was. Think you could blow him over with one puff; […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see the Libertarian candidate drop out of the Montana U.S. Senate race and endorse GOP nominee Matt Rosendale against Democratic Sen. Jon Tester. They also roll their eyes as “former Republican” Max Boot urges Americans to vote for Democrats in every single race as the the only way to send a message to President Trump and rescue the Republican Party. And they greatly enjoy Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren asserting she had no idea she was the subject of an ethics complaint for how she conducted fundraising off the Kavanaugh hearings.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Honesty Is the Best Business Practice

 

Some people choose to make a quick buck the shady way, and some choose to build a reputation and a loyal customer base. I’ve had two good experiences in the past week, and have an appointment with another trusted business tomorrow. Perhaps they will strike a chord with your experiences, good or bad.

Last week, I drove 30 minutes to my dentist, who has been my dentist since 2006. I have no intention of changing dentists, regardless of dental plan, so long as I live within an hour’s drive. This is because bad dentists leverage their expertise to sell unnecessary procedures. Honest dentists tell, and show you, what you must have done to avoid emergencies, then offer additional services you might want if you can afford them.

Jim Geraghty is back! Today, he and Greg Corombos of Radio America agree that it was time for VA Secretary David Shulkin to leave after months of ethical woes – but also a year of some progress at one of government’s biggest and most important bureaucracies. They also take on the identical script recorded by dozens of anchors at Sinclair stations, noting that the commitment to reporting facts is good but making every station say exactly the same thing looks really bad. And they slam Hillary Clinton for adding the Supreme Court decisions on Citizens United and the Voting Rights Act to her endless excuses for losing in 2016.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud White House Chief of Staff John Kelly for blasting four cabinet secretaries on ethics matters ranging from travel to office decor. They also shake their heads a day in advance of the special congressional election in Pennsylvania, as the Republican appears to be running a very weak campaign and the Democrat believes life begins at conception but opposes late-term abortions. And they get a kick out of Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren refusing to take a DNA test to resolve the controversy over her claims of Cherokee ancestry.

Member Post

 

Most people know the Golden Rule from Jesus/Yeshua: “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets” (Matthew 7:12, ESV). Another remark from him is closely associated with the Golden Rule: “The second [greatest commandment] is this: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself’ […]

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Member Post

 

You walk a familiar route. Again, there is litter on the ground. You pick it up and dispose of it when you can. There is always litter these days. And it’s getting worse. Every week there is more. You had hoped your example would inspire others, though that might not have been your full purpose. […]

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